CDL Road Test Tomorrow, Not Sure About The Trailer Registration

Topic 24240 | Page 2

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Old School's Comment
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How are you ever going to pull a load for this company if you can't even find a trailer your confident in for the test? All this talk of rust and spliced wires is really getting overly particular. Do the lights work? Are the brakes working? Nobody cares if the tandems are rusted, or the wires are spliced. I've spliced wires on trailers lots of times - that's how I got the lights working so it would be legal.

You can make this job way too hard on yourself. You don't want to start out overly stressing on non essential things. You'll stress yourself excessively and burn out in a matter of months.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Wow...quite the rust bucket. Take a good look at the tire nearest your camera lens...looks a bit “chunked”, flat spotted. Look at the tread depth on that spot.

Vincent S.'s Comment
member avatar

How are you ever going to pull a load for this company if you can't even find a trailer your confident in for the test? All this talk of rust and spliced wires is really getting overly particular. Do the lights work? Are the brakes working? Nobody cares if the tandems are rusted, or the wires are spliced. I've spliced wires on trailers lots of times - that's how I got the lights working so it would be legal.

You can make this job way too hard on yourself. You don't want to start out overly stressing on non essential things. You'll stress yourself excessively and burn out in a matter of months.

The lights and brakes work great. There is definitely a visible crack in the upper half of the shock, though. You're probably right and I am just stressing out about it for no reason. I really don't want to screw this up tomorrow, since they are doing me a huge favor by letting me use their truck and CDL driver on the clock. To be totally honest I don't plan on staying with this company for long after I get the CDL. All of their equipment is poorly maintained like these trailers...however it is their laid back attitude that is allowing me to get my CDL using their equipment, without making any type of commitment to drive for them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Vincent S.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow...quite the rust bucket. Take a good look at the tire nearest your camera lens...looks a bit “chunked”, flat spotted. Look at the tread depth on that spot.

That's not the actual trailer, just an similar one I found a photo of online. The actual trailer is a lot more rusty than the one in the photo lol. The tires are good on it, though.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Oh thank god!!! i really started to appreciate our trailers...they are like mercedes compared to that lol

it seems dishonest to use them and leave. and you dont have a 160 hour certificate so who will hire you?

Vincent S.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh thank god!!! i really started to appreciate our trailers...they are like mercedes compared to that lol

it seems dishonest to use them and leave. and you dont have a 160 hour certificate so who will hire you?

Their trailer is more rusty than that one lol. Even the brake canisters are badly rusted...but they do work and the tires are in good condition.

I won't be leaving right away. In fact I may stay, it just depends on how much overtime I get out of the deal. I'll end up staying for at least 4-5 months to see how it shakes out. They'll definitely get their investment out of me, since they won't have to bring in an additional driver this season and they can use me as needed on top of my current responsibilities(I'm a production foreman)...They're going to be saving thousands in just a few months by using me as a fill in driver and not bringing on another driver full time.

Another factor in whether or not I stay is what type of other jobs I'll be able to get without a 160 hour certificate, since I learned everything on my own. I know most of the big freight companies won't hire me, but surely I can find a decent local driving job here in a big city like Houston, TX. I prefer something where I can be home at least a couple nights per week anyways. If companies will be willing to consider my local driving at this job as experience, I may end up staying another year to be able to say I have a years experience.

Vincent S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the feedback everyone. I think I'll take 2019 rust bucket. There's only a small chance they will notice the cracked shock, where they're definitely going to notice a potentially expired registration.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Its the insurance companies not the trucking. without the 160 hrs you will be hard to insure. most of the mega carriers are self insured. and i know a guy who did the same as you and when he hit something, the company gave another drivers information to the other company and then told that experience driver to "step up and help the company. take the hit on your record for the company cause we couldn't insure this new guy".

be careful. i would imagine most companies will want at least 6 mos. the the 160 probably wont matter. As for local experience counting.... local only counts for local.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Isn't it missing a wheel on each side? Or is it just me?

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I thought the same thing, but he says this isn't the trailer, but simply a pic of a similar one, since I've never seen a trailer with a shock under it.. we don't have that kind where I work.

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