Schneider Vs Us Xpress

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Sergio M.'s Comment
member avatar

As a newbie how is walmart any different than “dollar”accounts? Why are there potentially more issues and more chance for accidents? sam

Jared...I agree wholeheartedly with Old School and Bob.

You’ll make just as much running Walmart, learn a ton, and NOT expose yourself to unnecessary risks and stress.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

As a newbie how is walmart any different than “dollar”accounts? Why are there potentially more issues and more chance for accidents? sam

double-quotes-start.png

Jared...I agree wholeheartedly with Old School and Bob.

You’ll make just as much running Walmart, learn a ton, and NOT expose yourself to unnecessary risks and stress.

double-quotes-end.png

The short answer...

Walmart Stores and Sam’s Club have docks, away from the parking lots, and usually accessible without commingling with the shoppers. About half of the stores I deliver to are easy, a quarter are tricky but not too difficult, the remaining 25% are more difficult.

Most Dollar stores do not have a dock, are found in strip malls and are extremely difficult to maneuver around and back to the unloading door.

I was OTR for 3 mos before accepting a Walmart Dedicated assignment. Although challenging, it’s no where near as risky running a Dollar Store Account.

You are new...

Good idea to invest your time in these links:

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Sergio, welcome to our forum!

Dollar accounts are tricky for a number of reasons. First off they are typically small freestanding stores with only one driveway to enter or exit. Many of them have no room for you to turn a rig around in the parking area. This means you'll be backing in off of a busy two way street. For a new driver that is a recipe for disaster. You'll have to block both lanes while maneuvering in and people get very impatient. I've seen this so many times. People come flying up not paying attention and then try to squeeze between the truck and a power pole, or some other obstacle, on the driver's blind side. At the same time other people are exiting the store and most of them could care less that you are trying to get in. They will stop your already slow progress by making crazy movements around the sides of your truck.

Then once you've managed to get in, the store is either understaffed or real busy so they don't have anybody to help you. Now you are hand unloading boxes that are stacked higher than you. Typically these loads are stacked to the ceiling, and you have multiple stops so you can't get the boxes mixed up. Once you've unloaded one store, it is quite possible your stacks will come tumbling down and you'll have a devil of a time keeping it all organized with each store and all the paperwork. I didn't even mention how you might injure yourself while hand unloading 80,000 pounds (two truck loads)of freight each week.

Physical injuries, and preventable accidents are common on these accounts.

I thought Schneider was a reputable company to work for?

They are a great company, and to be honest, we've seen a few people start on these "dollar store" accounts who did well with them. But... they were the exception.

Most new drivers cannot start on these accounts and do it successfully. There are several companies doing these accounts because they are lucrative. They require a lot from the driver, and many experienced drivers prefer to drive on the interstates and make their money that way. They want no-touch freight with drop and hook deliveries. Therefore there's strong demand for drivers on these accounts. Unfortunately the companies have had to take their chances with new drivers. We don't recommend it, but we understand the necessity - that's business, it always involves risk.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Think Family Dollar or Dollar General stores.. that's where these dollar account drivers have to back into and UNLOAD. Just brutal. In my opinion, I can make a heck of a lot more by cruising down the interstate and not touching any freight. I'm way too lazy to work one of those accounts.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Seabee-J's Comment
member avatar

Dollar accounts are a b*tch to do in straight job , definitely would never entertain the idea in a 53 , hell even a pup . Plus lugging all that frieght day in and out . I've talked to a few and most go back OTR after awhile . If they were such great gigs they wouldn't get offered to rooks . I'd listen to these vets if I was in your shoes .

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jared wrote:

Thanks guys I'll be going to schneider.i think it's the better fit for me.

Jared that’s a great choice.

I’ve been running NorthEast Regional Walmart Dedicated through Swift for almost 6 years now. Would not trade it for anything else.

Let me know when you need help with Walmart.

In the meantime you can read this thread to wet your appetite:

A Day in the Life of a Walmart Dedicated Driver

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

The trucking career is difficult to make a good start in. The training is minimal and the real learning comes while you're a rookie solo driver. That causes a lot of people to blame the company for their issues. It takes extraordinary effort to get through that first year's learning curve, and it's only those extraordinary people who usually survive it.

Honestly, I would put those questions and doubts about how these companies are to work for out of my mind. Each of them are great companies to work for. Focus on your commitment to developing yourself as a driver. I recommend you do an over the road job first. You'll ease yourself in to all the little tricks that will help you develop into a professional driver that way. Each of the three companies you've mentioned have plenty of other opportunities you could move into after you've gotten through that really tough first year.

1. Land your first job, determined to develop yourself into a safe productive over the road driver. Focus on your performance, not the company's.

2. Finish that rookie year as safely as you possibly can.

3. If your interest in certain other types of trucking jobs has developed, then request to be moved into those certain accounts.

Any safe and productive driver will certainly have his requests honored if they are needing drivers in the areas you might have developed an interest in. Swift probably has the most diverse set of opportunities available due to their size, but I'm not trying to sway your decision. Each of them will be great places to work.

This is quite possibly the very best response or post I’ve ever read on this site... every person “considering a career,” “preparing for school,” “in CDL school,” and “rookie solo drivers” should acknowledge that they read and understand these concepts.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The trucking career is difficult to make a good start in. The training is minimal and the real learning comes while you're a rookie solo driver. That causes a lot of people to blame the company for their issues. It takes extraordinary effort to get through that first year's learning curve, and it's only those extraordinary people who usually survive it.

Honestly, I would put those questions and doubts about how these companies are to work for out of my mind. Each of them are great companies to work for. Focus on your commitment to developing yourself as a driver. I recommend you do an over the road job first. You'll ease yourself in to all the little tricks that will help you develop into a professional driver that way. Each of the three companies you've mentioned have plenty of other opportunities you could move into after you've gotten through that really tough first year.

1. Land your first job, determined to develop yourself into a safe productive over the road driver. Focus on your performance, not the company's.

2. Finish that rookie year as safely as you possibly can.

3. If your interest in certain other types of trucking jobs has developed, then request to be moved into those certain accounts.

Any safe and productive driver will certainly have his requests honored if they are needing drivers in the areas you might have developed an interest in. Swift probably has the most diverse set of opportunities available due to their size, but I'm not trying to sway your decision. Each of them will be great places to work.

double-quotes-end.png

This is quite possibly the very best response or post I’ve ever read on this site... every person “considering a career,” “preparing for school,” “in CDL school,” and “rookie solo drivers” should acknowledge that they read and understand these concepts.

Old School’s hammer always strikes the nail squarely on the head. Great advice and observation Pete. I agree.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Me too! That was right on the money.smile.gif

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

0313352001547088194.jpg

I saw this store yesterday on my way to a Walmart supercenter in Albuquerque. This is a busy Street and I imagine it can be hell trying to get backed into this parking lot. Walmart definitely has easier stores, but we have about 3 that can be quite the headache especially during the day.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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