Are Logbook Notations Required When Changing Duty Status?

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Parrothead66's Comment
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I was told today that if you log on duty and don’t have any remarks that it’s a DOT violation. From what I was taught and read, I thought you only had to log location eg city, state when you do a change of status but nothing required as far as a remark about what activity you are doing. Can someone clarify this?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Aka- annotations.

I’ve always used them for things like PTI, fueling, deliveries, yard move, post-trip, etc. It’s easy on my QC; there are drop-downs with many options. Got into that habit long ago.

Other than showing an on-duty period for PTI of no less than 15 minutes per day, not really sure if it’s a citable violation. ???

Change of status location is automatically tagged by the ELD and telemetry systems on most trucks if so equipped. Go into your daily bar graph and touch the intersecting bars where a change of status occurred and the name of the locale will display.

I’ll ask around and check FMCSA website for guidance. To be safe I’d er on the side of caution and use the remarks to annotate the type of work being performed. Eliminates any questions an officer might have during an inspection.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

On e-logs you must absolutely show what it was that you were doing during every onduty period. Any on duty time with no remarks IS a DOT violation. On ours we have a pull down menu list of remarks like pre or post trips, fueling, scaling, etc or we can type in a custom remark as well.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

On e-logs you must absolutely show what it was that you were doing during every onduty period. Any on duty time with no remarks IS a DOT violation. On ours we have a pull down menu list of remarks like pre or post trips, fueling, scaling, etc or we can type in a custom remark as well.

On e-logs you must absolutely show what it was that you were doing during every onduty period. Any on duty time with no remarks IS a DOT violation. On ours we have a pull down menu list of remarks like pre or post trips, fueling, scaling, etc or we can type in a custom remark as well.

Thanks Susan. There yah have it...a trainer knows best.

Like I said, I’ve always noted what I am doing...using a similar drop down as Susan described. Never gave it a second thought.

Haven’t found anything on FMCSA website supporting this requirement though. Not the easiest thing to navigate...way-TMI.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Our logs compliance person constantly writes up drivers/repeat offenders for this.

Also, you must approve your e-logs every day. It's the equivalent of signing your old paper logs when that log page is complete. You are certifying that your legs are complete and correct.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Hahaha logs not legs.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I always make a notation when I'm changing duty status with the exception of when I'm starting on the drive line - that one is obvious. When I first switch to on duty after my ten hour break at a customer's location I may put something like this: "pre-trip inspection, and picking up pre-loaded trailer."

Now, let's say my load has three stops. When I arrive at the first stop I will switch to on duty and put this for my note: "arrive at stop." If I switch to off duty or sleeper berth I will just put "break" for the note. If I've switched to off duty or sleeper berth while at a customer I will put myself on duty just before leaving and make an entry like this: "signing bills and depart stop." I will continue this same method until I reach the consignee and then when I switch to on duty I will put, "arrive at consignee."

You also need to keep your trailer and load details current for each load. Your ELD should have a place where you can enter the trailer number, the license plate number and state that it's registered in. You also need to show the current bill of lading number and the shipper's name.

I put the bold emphasis on that one piece of advice because I've found a lot of new drivers don't realize this needs to be done. It's a very common citation when a thorough officer looks into your logs.

The notes are definitely a requirement for your logs. G-Town is correct about the entries for location...

Change of status location is automatically tagged by the ELD and telemetry systems on most trucks if so equipped.

Those entries are automatically processed by the truck's electronic system.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Absolutely Old School.. I tend to forget about that one since our load tab auto-populates that info for us. We only get a grim reminder if the system glitches and fails to auto-populates and we have to go back and manually enter the trailer/load info

Old School's Comment
member avatar
our load tab auto-populates that info for us.

That's cool. I've thought it would be easy for it to be set up that way, but I always have to enter mine manually. I guess we're not as advanced technologically as I think we should be.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I wish my load tab would auto-populate. On days I’ve got multiple drop and hook stops, it’s possible to have 4 entries in there for a single day...

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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