Argh! Need Help! I Panic During Testing!

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Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

For a while I taught pre-trip in Swift's Academy. One student really impressed me with his pre-trip. He explained everything add if it was HIS:

My alternator is securely attached, no cracks or breaks. My alternator belt has less than 3/4” free play, ....

My tire rim is not dented, has no illegal weld repairs, and all my lug nuts are tight. ...

If you take possession of your truck, you should be proud to show off its good condition.

Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

For a while I taught pre-trip in Swift's Academy. One student really impressed me with his pre-trip. He explained everything add if it was HIS:

double-quotes-start.png

My alternator is securely attached, no cracks or breaks. My alternator belt has less than 3/4” free play, ....

My tire rim is not dented, has no illegal weld repairs, and all my lug nuts are tight. ...

double-quotes-end.png

If you take possession of your truck, you should be proud to show off its good condition.

Actually, I do say my for everything and that does help, it's just a psychological thing in my head, not with the driving and backing parts, I'm doing great at those with my trainer, it's just the verbal pretrip, I basically have them memorized but just freeze up speaking. They want us to say "mr examiner" several times(I know it's just a sign of respect) and I really think that's part of the problem, because it drills the fact that I'm being tested into my head. Like I said absolutely no problems with actions, just speaking

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

Repetition repetition repetition repetition.

Seriously, do it over and over again repeatedly. Find your pattern, start from the same place every time, like front to back, left to right, rinse, repeat.

I must have done the pre-trip a couple hundred times during orientation and PSD. No exaggeration. They even nicknamed me "pretrip". By the time I took the exam, I could do it in my sleep.

Admittedly, all of my PSD was spent in house at Sprimo so I had lots of time to practice.

You'll get it pal. Don't sweat it.

Thanks turtle I've been doing it hundreds of times, and I really do have it memorized, it's just the act of speaking and being verbally tested, I've always had a public speaking issue. I'll figure it out and I WILL succeed somehow, thank you very much for your help.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
JJlearner's Comment
member avatar

I have the same issue with pre-trip. The main reasons I decided not to continue w/ my corporate career are public speaking and group discussions. I like to be myself and alone. At the same time all our moderators and other experienced drivers are really helping us here with their advices and I think I will be able to do it.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Repetition repetition repetition repetition.

Seriously, do it over and over again repeatedly. Find your pattern, start from the same place every time, like front to back, left to right, rinse, repeat.

I must have done the pre-trip a couple hundred times during orientation and PSD. No exaggeration. They even nicknamed me "pretrip". By the time I took the exam, I could do it in my sleep.

Admittedly, all of my PSD was spent in house at Sprimo so I had lots of time to practice.

You'll get it pal. Don't sweat it.

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks turtle I've been doing it hundreds of times, and I really do have it memorized, it's just the act of speaking and being verbally tested, I've always had a public speaking issue. I'll figure it out and I WILL succeed somehow, thank you very much for your help.

Hey Michael, I had your issue but on the opposite side of testing. I aced the pretrip cause I followed the same sequence every single time. Muscle memory. I wrote the speeches over & over again until it just flowed.

Where I got knots in my stomach was on the backing & the road test. I failed each twice so I had my back up against the wall both times. I just had no other option but to pass or go home. I was 55 years old at the time & hadn't needed to prove myself since my teenage years. That was huge for me. Failing taught me humility & perseverance.

I guess the best advice I could give you is to keep repeating it with your trainer present. Over & over until you get past this.

I memorized the sequences by connecting the components. Sort of like this bone is connected to that bone. The speeches also follow a sequence so it's about doing it with an authority figure in your face every time until you mentally get past it.

This just came to me, when you do it alone, do you say the words out loud? If you do, do you listen to your words? What I mean is, are you saying them robotically or are you projecting your voice from a place of authority? Saying them for the world to hear rather than the person standing next to you. My examiner stood well enough back so I just followed my routine & said it for the world to hear. Good luck!

PS, I've stayed away from posting for personal reasons but your topic hit home for me & hoped I could be of help as many others were there for me when I was in your shoes.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Repetition repetition repetition repetition.

Seriously, do it over and over again repeatedly. Find your pattern, start from the same place every time, like front to back, left to right, rinse, repeat.

I must have done the pre-trip a couple hundred times during orientation and PSD. No exaggeration. They even nicknamed me "pretrip". By the time I took the exam, I could do it in my sleep.

Admittedly, all of my PSD was spent in house at Sprimo so I had lots of time to practice.

You'll get it pal. Don't sweat it.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks turtle I've been doing it hundreds of times, and I really do have it memorized, it's just the act of speaking and being verbally tested, I've always had a public speaking issue. I'll figure it out and I WILL succeed somehow, thank you very much for your help.

double-quotes-end.png

Hey Michael, I had your issue but on the opposite side of testing. I aced the pretrip cause I followed the same sequence every single time. Muscle memory. I wrote the speeches over & over again until it just flowed.

Where I got knots in my stomach was on the backing & the road test. I failed each twice so I had my back up against the wall both times. I just had no other option but to pass or go home. I was 55 years old at the time & hadn't needed to prove myself since my teenage years. That was huge for me. Failing taught me humility & perseverance.

I guess the best advice I could give you is to keep repeating it with your trainer present. Over & over until you get past this.

I memorized the sequences by connecting the components. Sort of like this bone is connected to that bone. The speeches also follow a sequence so it's about doing it with an authority figure in your face every time until you mentally get past it.

This just came to me, when you do it alone, do you say the words out loud? If you do, do you listen to your words? What I mean is, are you saying them robotically or are you projecting your voice from a place of authority? Saying them for the world to hear rather than the person standing next to you. My examiner stood well enough back so I just followed my routine & said it for the world to hear. Good luck!

PS, I've stayed away from posting for personal reasons but your topic hit home for me & hoped I could be of help as many others were there for me when I was in your shoes.

Hey there splitter, I'm also 55 years young. I've got the whole thing streamlined and memorized, when I go through it by myself or teamed up with another student testing eachother, I'm loud, confident, and efficient at delivery. I think when I do it with another student it's like we are teaching eachother so it doesnt bother me, but when im under the pressure of actually being tested by trainer I falter badly. Thinking I just need to get it through my thick head that im just doing it with another student, after all, the trainer and examiner are former students, right?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Splitter's Comment
member avatar

"Thinking I just need to get it through my thick head that im just doing it with another student, after all, the trainer and examiner are former students, right?"

I feel you! Yes, that's what it all boils down to. Do whatever it takes to get that confidence boost & ace this.

Sidenote: I was just reading your diary & saw that you flew rather than taking the "dirty dog". Good choice. If you haven't done so already, make your recruiter aware cause Prime will reimburse you for the price of the bus ticket when you finish TNT & upgrade to A-seat. Just follow up with your recruiter at that time also.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Britton's Comment
member avatar

Hey man, I honestly don't have any great advice but if you can find a way to channel the same determination you have been using for everything else into this you will find a way.

I think it's important to give yourself a break in the sense that it's ok to be nervous. Sure, they're examiners but they want to see you do well and pass. I know I would, if I'm testing someone I'd enjoy seeing students displaying their knowledge.

I would try to approach them much the same as anyone else when testing. I've talked to you several times, you are a very respectful person. My point is, act the same as you do with others, your demeanor is already polite.

My point is, try to humanize them. Just keep at it I know you'll find a way.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It's common for the coach of an underdog team who is getting ready to play against a much better team to remind his players that you're only playing against the man in the uniform, not the uniform itself. Don't be intimidated by the uniform or the history of the team or anything that doesn't affect the game itself. Focus on the man and the moment and nothing else.

Forget about the uniform or the title or the authority or any of that. You're just in front of a person, a person who is no different than you. They have dreams, fears, and insecurities just like you do. They're trying to make a living and provide for themselves and their loved ones just like you. They want to be successful in life and their job now is to help you be successful by making sure you're ready to safely inspect a truck, which you already know you are.

Remember that it's just a person who wants to help you succeed, and you know you will because you've worked hard and learned the materials well. So that person is going to be happy to pass you when they see what you've done. Be excited for the opportunity.

Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey man, I honestly don't have any great advice but if you can find a way to channel the same determination you have been using for everything else into this you will find a way.

I think it's important to give yourself a break in the sense that it's ok to be nervous. Sure, they're examiners but they want to see you do well and pass. I know I would, if I'm testing someone I'd enjoy seeing students displaying their knowledge.

I would try to approach them much the same as anyone else when testing. I've talked to you several times, you are a very respectful person. My point is, act the same as you do with others, your demeanor is already polite.

My point is, try to humanize them. Just keep at it I know you'll find a way.

That's great advise, and I really appreciate it coming from a fellow trainee, were kind of in this together, thank you!

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