Flatbed Securement Question

Topic 24825 | Page 1

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∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

I just got a load of steal beams going to a job site. There are 5 of us going to the same site.

When I got to my pre loaded /secured trailer, I knew instantly that I wanted to toss a few more straps on it. So I pulled the trailer into our terminal staging area, and went to work. I wound up rearranging all but the very front strap, and 2 of the middle bundle straps.

The load is just shy of 42,000 lbs, and there were 8 straps already on it. I added 5 more. The WLL of my straps, I figured @ 5,400 lbs, even though some are rated at 5,500.

My question is, what would you other flatbedders have done differently ? There are 3 stacks on top of the long beams, that are odd shaped bundles.

0243274001552096178.jpg0480730001552096230.jpg0266582001552096317.jpg

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

I would personally put a choke strap on each of the odd shaped bundles. I've seen that metal banding come loose or break more times than not. Other than that, my straps would look a lot like yours. I'm an over-secure guy for sure lol

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

That's a pretty good looking load, there are 3 things I'd do a tad different:

1- I'd add another belly strap on the rear of the bottom beam. Not a big deal, but I'm just OCD like that when it comes to beams.

0101220001552099433.jpg

2- I'd have the strap closer to the dunnage, directly over it if possible. Again, just a personal habit of mine to limit any chance of the dunnage shifting.

0344745001552099586.jpg

3- I would definitely not have the ratchet over the tire like this. Hit the right pothole or lose an airbag and that ratchet will chew up the tire. Some of our trailers have stop-bolts in place to prevent ratchets from being placed over a tire for that reason. We have portable ratchets for these situations.

0244397001552100035.jpg

So yeah the first 2 things are just subtle differences in method. The 3rd thing could be serious though.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar
3- I would definitely not have the ratchet over the tire like this. Hit the right pothole or lose an airbag and that ratchet will chew up the tire. Some of our trailers have stop-bolts in place to prevent ratchets from being placed over a tire for that reason. We have portable ratchets for these situations.

Thanks Tuttle. I overlooked that one. I can easily move that one forward. A different set of eyes always helps.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I like all the suggestions.

It's a good question Danielsahn. Steel loads can be both tricky and dangerous. Do you guys have any 4" hand ratchets that you can use when necessary? I always keep three on board for those times where I really need a strap directly over a tire. Some of our trailers are more accommodating for this, and some are like Turtle described with stops that won't allow you to get a winch in place over a tire.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Danielsahn, here's a tip that's not specific to this particular load. When calculating my WLL of my straps I typically use 5,000 pounds per 4" strap. This makes the math easier and quicker in my head, and it assures me that I'm exceeding what is legally and/or technically required. If I end up throwing eight straps, I've got an extra 3,200 pounds WLL in place for securing the load.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, vi have 4, 4" hand ratchets. I was able to move the the strap forward, taking it out of the danger zone.

Danielsahn, here's a tip that's not specific to this particular load. When calculating my WLL of my straps I typically use 5,000 pounds per 4" strap. This makes the math easier and quicker in my head, and it assures me that I'm exceeding what is legally and/or technically required. If I end up throwing eight straps, I've got an extra 3,200 pounds WLL in place for securing the load.

I used 5,400 because 4 of my straps were rated at 5,400. But I usually just calculate by an even 5,000 that way I have 400 or 500 "extra" lbs of buffer.

I would personally put a choke strap on each of the odd shaped bundles. I've seen that metal banding come loose or break more times than not. Other than that, my straps would look a lot like yours. I'm an over-secure guy for sure lol

Please explain "choke strap.". Is it what I call a "belly wrap?" The strap going over, back under, then over again?

And yes, you can never have too much securement! 😊

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
Please explain "choke strap.". Is it what I call a "belly wrap?" The strap going over, back under, then over again?

Yes that's what Chris means, and its a great suggestion. Doing so literally chokes the bundle together so it stays intact if a metal band breaks.

In my opinion, steel loads like this are some of the trickiest to play with. The steel flexes more than you would think, dunnage will creep out, and beams will shift. Be extra vigilant on your en route securement checks.

Christian F.'s Comment
member avatar

I know I am putting in my opinion late, but I agree I would do some belly wrap the load, I usually would put a strap before and after dunage, and also I always figure 5000 lbs per strap for ease. Again no such thing as over secure

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

It's never too late 😁

I try to strap as close to the dunnage as possible too, if my strap placement allows for my ocd tendency to obtain perfect symmetry. Lol. Especially if my load is bendy.

I know I am putting in my opinion late, but I agree I would do some belly wrap the load, I usually would put a strap before and after dunage, and also I always figure 5000 lbs per strap for ease. Again no such thing as over secure

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