Jim Palmer Wilson Logistics Training Montana

Topic 25126 | Page 1

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Noworrez's Comment
member avatar

Alright people's, I'll try to do this and hopefully provide some helpful information..no promises as this isn't really my thing.

Day 1 04/01/2019 Van picked us up at 6:50 dropped us at driver lounge to go back and pick up 2 more people. Sat there until 7:29 when they took roll call. Will be doing paperwork, physical and apparently a lot of busy stuff today. 5 people in our class. Did the tour and met everyone that was here and now waiting 1/2 hour before drug test. Being highly organized, it's funny to sit back and observe where things could be tweaked to capitalize on the time available. However, perhaps it's practice for learning patience.

Several people from California that got here by bus that left Friday to arrive Sunday...ouch! Can't find fault with my 1 hour 20 min flight. Greyhound would have been 11+ hours and I have a bunch of airline miles so after being reimbursed the greyhound cost I should make some $$ on the deal to offset dinner costs, sweet!

Was suppose to have a roommate but no one showed up, even left the light on for them but finally turned it off at 1:20am since it was causing some lousy sleep.

Half hour turned into an hour. 8:28 off to drug test. 😄

The rest of the day was spent going over paperwork and agility test at the truck...in/out cab, in/out trailer, raising/lowering trailer gear and coupling uncoupling. We we're done at about 4pm

Cheers

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Flying definitely sounds better than what those other students endured on the bus! I look forward to following along on your journey if you feel so inclined to share it. Remember although many people don't comment there are a ton of people reading. Good luck!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Noworrez's Comment
member avatar

Day 2 04/02/2019 Van pickup at 7am, filled out CDL permit transfer paperwork then off to the DMV. Between paperwork and testing, took about 2 hours. Passed all 3 tests with 100%. What I recommend is using the DMV Driver genie app set to the state you are testing in, as well, go to cristcdl.com and take those tests, take the test on here and I also searched CDL permit practice test (insert state you are testing in). What I found is between all these, you will find different questions or similar ones but worded differently. I figured if I took several tests from different sources, there are only so many questions and ways to ask them.

Testing is progressive, so once you get 80% correct or 79% it is either pass or fail. The key is to answer the for sure questions, skip the unsure ones, then if/when they come back round, you answer the kind of sure questions. If that makes sense.

So far out of 4 other students, 2 passed all, 1 failed general test and the other failed combo. They will retake the failed portions tomorrow and if they don't pass, find your own ride home time.

It is stressful leading up to the test wondering if you'll pass, but if you've studied, then study some more, no worries, it was fairly easy.

Back to the yard, lunch, pre-trip video then spent the rest of afternoon driving on the simulator and shoring up paperwork.

Tomorrow should be live in truck around town bobtailing.

Cheers.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Avvatar's Comment
member avatar

You know, i'm really looking forward to the simulator. it just sounds like a good/horrible time. Best of luck in your training.

Noworrez's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Rob T

Avvatar, the Sim is a weird sensation but fun. The instructor liked throwing stuff at us like an overpass to low..watch your signs, or if not checking your mirrors enough you'd start slowing down, air pressure drops you lose your brakes...why he asks? He'd make you sweat a bit then tell you to look in your mirrors and see you trailer is on 🔥. Rain, fog, ice and a blowout on the steer tires, he is a bit of a jokester but it makes for good learning and some good laughs.

Cheers

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Noworrez's Comment
member avatar

Ok, so here are the seat classes

*4-seat classes *Permit holder will complete a total of 40k *Start to completion takes approx 3-3.5 weeks.

D-seat: At the end of week 1 we head out with a trainer for 10k miles minimum of 75 hrs drive time. Once complete we come back to Missoula for evaluation, interview and actual CDL road test/pre-trip. NO PAY during this phase but they will advance you $200 a week then deduct $25 per week once hired. Something to consider if $$ is tight. Personally I didn't want to start in the hole so opted out of the advance because I had saved $.

C-seat: You've acquired your CDL everything good to this point receive job offer. Pay is .12/mile for ALL team dispatched miles or $600 per week guarantee. Now you must complete 20k miles. IF you are Palmer permit holder, you are credited 10k from d seat plus the 10k you'll do for c-seat = 20k OR you come in as a CDL holder and go out for 20k essentially skipping D-seat

B-seat: B-2 and B-1 pay now goes to .14/mile or $700 minimum. This where it can get confusing. B- seat must complete 20k I don't recall the exact break down but B-2 will be 17 to 18k then back to Missoula. B-1 you will complete a solo week of 2k to 3k consisting of properly operating the vehicle, pre/post inspections, not hitting anything, no moving or dot violations and providing on time service. When completed, back to Missoula for evaluation reports and interviews to determine upgrade.

A-seat: you will attend onboarding in Missoula (unpaid Tuesday-Thursday so plan ahead) successfully pass upgrade skills test is agility, backing and driving. If you've made it this far, should be no problem.

Now you are fully qualified, receive truck and become a solo driver. .44/mile + .05 fuel incentive (material says .40+fuel but think that was raised) for OTR. Regional is .45cpm no fuel incentive running Western 10, very little to no running New Mexico.

Side note: So you want to lease? Sorry but no can do for minimum of 90 days after achieving A-seat.

Welp, think that's about it. Any ?? Ask and I'll do my best to answer.

Cheers!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Noworrez, thanks for the detailed entries. They're going to be really helpful to people who read them in the future.

Here's a side note from those of us experienced enough to see through the lure of leasing... PUHLEEEZ, DON'T DO IT!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Noworrez's Comment
member avatar

Here's a side note from those of us experienced enough to see through the lure of leasing... PUHLEEEZ, DON'T DO IT!

Yes sir Old School! That message has been shouted loud and clear. Great advice people, listen to experience. Cheers.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

Hey there! Current Jim Palmer driver here. Been solo for 5 months now so any questions you might have, ask away.

Yes, the waiting around is to test your patience. Marc and Darwin will test your patience, nerves and willpower. Especially Marc. He'll purposefully try to get ya going. It's all to see how well you manage the stress. Even more so after you come back to test. LOL

Oh, by the way, Noodle Express is what's for lunch today. HA HA! Thursday is Costco's pizza. Friday might be Freddy's or MOD pizza.

smile.gif

Noworrez's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Dave, that's some great stuff. Noticed that with Marc for sure. Haven't had much interaction with Darwin as he's doing onboarding. They must have drawn straws! 😂. That will change today since Marc is on vacation. Believe it will be Carina (spelling)? And Casey today.

Are you running regional or otr?

Cheers

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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