Jim Palmer Wilson Logistics Training Montana

Topic 25126 | Page 4

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Noworrez's Comment
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As Matthew said above, ask questions, ask for more practice, ask for what you need.

While my 1st trainer stopped everyday to practice backing, the 2nd did not, we practiced one evening with a 40,000lb load 90 once and offset once. Everything seemed like a time crunch so I didn't get to back at any shippers or receivers, thus I did not feel confident in my skills so what did I do? I asked if I could get some more practice back at the yard and they made it happen. Did multiple 90's and offsets.

Off to DMV testing site. No 10 speed so tested in an automatic. I was a bit bummed about this but the more I thought about it, so what? Everything is going to automatics. If in the future I need it, I'll already have my CDL so all I'd need to do is the driving portion to remove the restriction.

I got the lucky draw for pretrip...the entire truck and trailer! 😂. The tester didn't want me going over every wheel and brake assembly. After doing the front one, she asked me the difference between front and rear tires, answer minimum 4/32 2/32 respectively.

Damn, I was going to make this short. Anyway, I nailed the pre-trip, nailed the in cab inspection and nailed the in cab brake test.

On to the backing: deep breath, you've visualized this for weeks now Kelly, you've got this!

Before starting I made sure the trailer was in the box, climbed in the cab and sighted a reference point for the 90 and offset. Pulled forward to the designated cone and backed in past the second set of cones, done.

90 degree, pulled out watching the track of my trailer and noticed black tire marks from all the ones that came before me. I simply followed my track back in, did one small pull up prior to going in the box to adjust more to a 45 and put it right in. Sighting my reference point, used one of my get out and looks to make sure I was where I needed to be, went to go back and sound the horn and she stopped me, saying you're good.

The offset, now that morning I practiced different from what I had been practicing, so I trusted the instructors as the practice pad was set up exactly like the testing pad. Hindsight, I should have done it my way. However, I took my time, used one of my pull ups to get more straight, began backing and was a nats ass from the edge of the cone, literally! I used my second pull up to adjust over and backed it right in to my reference point, sounded the horn and I was done. No points!

Now having done that, I wouldn't recommend what I did and use your G.O.A.L but with my reference point I felt 100% confident I was where I needed to be.

Off we went on the drive, so to keep this short, nailed that as well. No idea if I received any points, she didn't say but I passed all her tests and was done!!

Woot woot, have my CDL, officially hired, received my ID badge/key card and fuel card, now I wait for a trainer.

Cheers, Kelly

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Noworrez's Comment
member avatar

3 other students testing failed. One from the week before our class botched his 90. One of the other two used a couple pull ups to get his 90 in the box and when he did another pull up to adjust knocked over a cone I believe. And the other passed all his backing but when pulling out of the DMV testing center didn't pull out far enough and ran over the curb, automatic fail. She did take him through the rest of the course but informed him he failed when he got back to the testing site.

The real bummer about this is there are no other appointments this week and next week they are closed for training. Two so far have gone back out with their trainer's and won't be testing until the week of 5/6, ouch!

Best advice I can offer on backing from my very limited experience is: TAKE YOUR TIME. You are not under a clock, go slow, don't over think it, do what you've been practicing, make the minor adjustments necessary to walk it in the box. My first trainer constantly said, if you have the space, use it! Pull forward as far as necessary to get your set up where you need it.

Well, that's it for now.

Cheers, Kelly

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

WOW! Congratulations Driver!

dancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gif

Sounds like I might be in Missoula in a few days. Might get to meet if you're still there.

Noworrez's Comment
member avatar

Hey Dave, thanks! I'm heading out tomorrow morning, 4/27 with Jim Pickrell who apparently I am told gets his students through C and B seats very quickly so I'm guessing we'll be going non stop.

Cheers, Kelly

Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

Heard good things about Jim. Good luck and keep the shiny side up.

Hey Dave, thanks! I'm heading out tomorrow morning, 4/27 with Jim Pickrell who apparently I am told gets his students through C and B seats very quickly so I'm guessing we'll be going non stop.

Cheers, Kelly

Matthew W.'s Comment
member avatar

Congrats driver! You're absolutely right with backing. Take youe time and g.o.a.l. as many times as you need to. The worst thing you can do is add silly preventable backing mistales to your dac score.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Gad's Comment
member avatar

Any updates? How is the D seat training going?

It's going good need more practice in traffic and retaining all the information
Army 's Comment
member avatar

Hello,

I also have a question, that I couldn't find on the website does JP have flatbed driving opportunities?

Thanks

Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

No flatbed. Just regional dry van (western 11), north western heavy haul and advanced fleet (Prime reefer).

Hello,

I also have a question, that I couldn't find on the website does JP have flatbed driving opportunities?

Thanks

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Hello,

I also have a question, that I couldn't find on the website does JP have flatbed driving opportunities?

Thanks

So if you want to pull a skateboard, go to Prime and get Turtle to train you.smile.gif

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