CMV Weight Issues

Topic 25169 | Page 2

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Splitter's Comment
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Btw, a snot almost flew out my nose when I read Old School's post. rofl-2.gifrofl-3.gif

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Don't knock it... I've used that solution more than once. If it's pallet to pallet front to back it's not going to work but things like totes that don't touch from front to back... Your in there...confused.gif

I wish I could do that. I'd get a critical event in heartbeat. And don't think I didn't consider doing it that on my 34,040 load but Prime has their trucks wired like inspector gadget. I have the keypad for the alarm, the lane departure warning system, the tire air pressure monitoring system, the radar & brake assist, the anti-roll... hmmm God only knows what else is in here that I'm not aware of.

RealDiehl's Comment
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Update: if you bet the under you won. Do not see me for payouts. I'm outta here...

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
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FYI posting what hole you're in only helps you with Prime people. Not every trailer holes are the same. Our newest trailers are at the 40' mark with them all the way forward.

Susan D. 's Comment
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Quite honestly, I've never understood the strange hole counting thing.

You obviously need to get about 1000 pounds off your tandems. Is sliding them back not an option?

And as old school said.. speed up and hit the brakes hard.. do this a few times and then get a reweigh. It works and I do this on scrap loads from time to time. I don't recommend with breakables.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Splitter's Comment
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FYI posting what hole you're in only helps you with Prime people. Not every trailer holes are the same. Our newest trailers are at the 40' mark with them all the way forward.

We have a few from '15 that are completely different from our standard trailers. I'd pay good money to see his reaction when he runs into those. If I remember correctly, they start with 153... But yeah, we "Primates" speak [grunt] our own language. Lol

Oh, I know that about those trailers cause I thought I was losing my marbles when I got one going to Cali & it was locked in the 9th hole when all Cali loads can only be in the 6th hole or less. I did notice the spacing between the holes was closer than normal but the sticker on the side was from our standard trailers. Guess who had to change the sticker?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Quite honestly, I've never understood the strange hole counting thing.

You obviously need to get about 1000 pounds off your tandems. Is sliding them back not an option?

And as old school said.. speed up and hit the brakes hard.. do this a few times and then get a reweigh. It works and I do this on scrap loads from time to time. I don't recommend with breakables.

Hmmm, I wonder if your pulling our collective leg with that comment about strange hole counting thing but for us it helps us figure out how much weight we're moving per hole. They say that on dry van each hole equals 250 lbs & on reefer it can be from 300-500 lbs per hole. We have gauges on our trailers that help too.

The furthest back we can slide our tandems is the 12th hole, where he was positioned, in order to be legal in most states except CA & state routes in IN.

I once had to do Old School's maneuver with a trailer full of eggs to keep from taking out a 4 wheeler that cut me off then slam on his brakes. The entire rest of that trip, I expected to find an omelet when they opened those doors. Thankfully they had crazy protection all around their precious cargo. I was shocked that i didn't get a critical event on that one.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PlanB's Comment
member avatar

I guess I can understand it may seem strange seeing a bunch of Primeates talk about what hole they're putting it in. (Did that sound dirty?)

Prime puts these reference stickers on the driver's side of our trailers right above the trailer tandems.

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The trailer can't tell us "No!" so this is how we tell if we are in a legal hole or not. (Still sounds dirty)

I've had a few Tyson loads that were very tail heavy. I had to sick it in a far rear hole after checking to be sure I was legal. (Don't want any trouble with the law!)

Check the reference sticker and don't be afraid to stick it behind the 12th hole. (Or to get dirty!)

Quite honestly, I've never understood the strange hole counting thing.

You obviously need to get about 1000 pounds off your tandems. Is sliding them back not an option?

And as old school said.. speed up and hit the brakes hard.. do this a few times and then get a reweigh. It works and I do this on scrap loads from time to time. I don't recommend with breakables.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Rob T.'s Comment
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Primeates talk about what hole they're putting it in. (Did that sound dirty?)

Always gotta have a plan B....

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

You obviously need to get about 1000 pounds off your tandems. Is sliding them back not an option?

Sorry for the lack of all necessary information, Susan and Big Scott. I hope Splitter's explanations cleared things up for everyone.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

And thanks, Plan B for the ambiguously dirty explanation. I'm sure we'll all feel a little more awkward now talking about tandem positioning.

embarrassed.gifembarrassed.gif

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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