CMV Weight Issues

Topic 25169 | Page 5

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Rob T.'s Comment
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I honestly thought this hole-counting thing was universal. US Xpress was the same (or at least that's the way my former trainer taught me). He was not a Trucking Truth member though.

I was taught by the trainer I have at my current company to count holes. With what we haul he told me 7th hole will almost always be legal. Keep in mind our loads are balanced pretty well whether it's our store deliveries or backhauls. I use that as a starting point to get to the nearest scale if needed.

Chuck S.'s Comment
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Most ... not all... scales will give you 300 lbs... I was1000 lbs over on my tandems and the scale officer took 300lbs off and wrote the ticket for 700 still cost me 182.00 bucks...

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How far is your destination? Scales are usually closed late at night and on weekends.smile.gif

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I have literally ran some loads that were overweight to save time, when they weren't going far. rofl-3.gif

Took my chances and even got the bypass on some open scales!

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For the love of God Jamie! I once made a shipper rework my load cause it was 34,040! I'm not risking my DAC or my wallet for nobody! Even if you guaranteed me all the scales would be closed, I still wouldn't risk my clean record for no one.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Most ... not all... scales will give you 300 lbs..

Where did you come up with this non-fact, Chuck.? I’d like the reference so I can look it up somewhere. Lunch counter myth.

Amish country's Comment
member avatar

Pull a tank, never count holes again! It can get tricky sometimes since it loads however it wants. I've backed on a hill and hit the brakes to shift some product back before. If were over we just take the citation and the company pays it. No other choice really. Learn the backroads and avoid weight stations all together.

On a side note. Today I was loaded on a scale and my BOL registered my gross at 78,900. When I was heading out it didnt feel right and my drive pressures where higher then normal so I went over the scale on the way out (this quarry is used by 2 different customers and each has a scale at the entrance). This showed my weight as 82,420. The loading scale wasnt reading correctly at a section and nobody had noticed.

If it doesnt feel right check it. If your still not sure, check it again.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

In reference to hole counting I am reposting this from a thread that was active over a year ago...

One final point on counting holes...the below graphic is applied to the driver's side, at approximately the 41' mark of every Walmart reefer and dry van in their fleet. Truth!

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The reason this works for Walmart trailers? Standardized trailer specifications.

Remember this is the maximum the tandems can be set to the rear of the trailer. Obviously the most restrictive state is California. The weight of the Walmart grocery loads I typically run in the NorthEast could not be legally scaled in Cali.

If you read all of the content on this notice, it applies to equipment with standard 6” hole spacing for a 17’ 6” rail. For trailers with a micro-spacing on 4” centers, they have a different notice with equiment specific information.

Regardless...knowing KingPin laws and guidance for states you are driving through is absolutely required.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Diver Driver's Comment
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TYSON: Trucker You're Staying Over Night

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