Wind & Carelessness

Topic 25206 | Page 3

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Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

The Primate was definitely slowing down. As far as empty, wasn't empty. Judging by the way I'd catch up going down hill and they'd get ahead going up they had 30k or so in the box.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
I could see my trailer tandems over the white line even though my truck was centered.

I had the same problem today my rear trailer wanted to run on the line. The container truck in front of me was doing the same thing I was almost able to read the name on the side.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Seabee-J's Comment
member avatar

This is a great thread, learned something new . I'd think that the wind would be a much greater factor for the van/reefers than the flatbedders and tankers due to the height and structure of the trailers , correct me if I'm wrong on this though . I remember about a year ago a guy got blown off the 301 bridge in MD right into the Chesapeake and was standing on his trailer for rescue . Wind is no joke .

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

There were some videos on CDLLife of trucks near Amarillo, TX yesterday getting blown around and two that overturned. Sustained winds were reported at 64 mph, gusting to 80 mph plus. No truck should be on the road with those conditions.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Phoenix's Comment
member avatar

There were some videos on CDLLife of trucks near Amarillo, TX yesterday getting blown around and two that overturned. Sustained winds were reported at 64 mph, gusting to 80 mph plus. No truck should be on the road with those conditions.

That's odd, cuz i spent my 10 in the petro in Amarillo. I must have slept hard lol. There were winds sure, but only like 17mph or so.

Anyway, i have a question for kenworth drivers, or anyone familiar with newer ones... I'm fighting 25-35mph winds, gusts to 45, but I'm loaded +44 thou. I don't understand why I'm having to fight so hard to stay off the shoulder with every gust and truck that blows by. I'm lucky if i do 55mph, more like 50-53. Is it because it's pretty much a cross wind, or is it this truck? The 17 Volvo i had last liked to lean with the wind, but i wouldn't fight to remain on the road. A lighter load and i wouldn't be so concerned, I'd just be going much, much slower, if not off the road all together.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

Like the name states I am a noob so I dont know much of anything. My trainers truck is a 2018 T680 and heading south down I39 through Wisonsin and Illinois i was being blown all over with 40k in the trailer. Now that was my first experience with winds and my trainer said its normal but at the end of the day my arms felt like i was werestling pythons all day. Coming out of every overpass was like a punch to the side. Ive never driven anything but this Kenworth so i cant tell ya anything else.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

There were some videos on CDLLife of trucks near Amarillo, TX yesterday getting blown around and two that overturned. Sustained winds were reported at 64 mph, gusting to 80 mph plus. No truck should be on the road with those conditions.

double-quotes-end.png

That's odd, cuz i spent my 10 in the petro in Amarillo. I must have slept hard lol. There were winds sure, but only like 17mph or so.

Anyway, i have a question for kenworth drivers, or anyone familiar with newer ones... I'm fighting 25-35mph winds, gusts to 45, but I'm loaded +44 thou. I don't understand why I'm having to fight so hard to stay off the shoulder with every gust and truck that blows by. I'm lucky if i do 55mph, more like 50-53. Is it because it's pretty much a cross wind, or is it this truck? The 17 Volvo i had last liked to lean with the wind, but i wouldn't fight to remain on the road. A lighter load and i wouldn't be so concerned, I'd just be going much, much slower, if not off the road all together.

Did you look at that site and the videos on it?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Phoenix's Comment
member avatar

Not yet, PackRat, but i will when i shut down tonight. I was thinking after i made that comment, that there were warnings of severe storms a bit south of me. Wasn't trying to say it didn't happen, just that i was in that area last night. Still amazes me how weather can be soooo different just a few miles away lol.

Thanks, Noob! I feel a little better not being the only one lol. I'm wondering if it's an air ride thing maybe? All i do know, is if i try to accelerate, the left side of my truck feels like it's lifting and each gust is pushing me strongly enough my left arm aches, and i am well used to winds of this velocity. confused.gif

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

There were some videos on CDLLife of trucks near Amarillo, TX yesterday getting blown around and two that overturned. Sustained winds were reported at 64 mph, gusting to 80 mph plus. No truck should be on the road with those conditions.

double-quotes-end.png

That's odd, cuz i spent my 10 in the petro in Amarillo. I must have slept hard lol. There were winds sure, but only like 17mph or so.

Anyway, i have a question for kenworth drivers, or anyone familiar with newer ones... I'm fighting 25-35mph winds, gusts to 45, but I'm loaded +44 thou. I don't understand why I'm having to fight so hard to stay off the shoulder with every gust and truck that blows by. I'm lucky if i do 55mph, more like 50-53. Is it because it's pretty much a cross wind, or is it this truck? The 17 Volvo i had last liked to lean with the wind, but i wouldn't fight to remain on the road. A lighter load and i wouldn't be so concerned, I'd just be going much, much slower, if not off the road all together.

It's not so much the Kenworth that's your problem... It's being fresh out of a Volvo. Them things are super heavy and tend to deal with the wind really well. My first truck was a Volvo also. The first gust of wind I took in a Freightliner after the Volvo... I stopped for a few minutes and changed my underwear.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Avvatar's Comment
member avatar

First time driving otr in Roehl training on Friday. We bobtailed around town and got used to the path. Then we hooked up an empty and headed back out. 20+ mph winds are no joke! I'm new and not used to things, but that's why I came up here (Wisconsin). It's allowing me to train in some conditions I might never have to experience. But if/when I do, I can remember training. Stay safe out there. No load is worth unsafe driving.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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