Maverick Vs. TMC

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Tyler K.'s Comment
member avatar

I am separating from the military after 8 years of service. I did not do any driving in the military as I was a mechanic, so I am coming into the game with no CDL. I have a wife and a daughter and we own a couple of houses, so taking 8+ weeks with no pay to get my CDL is not an option. Because of this, I am looking at companies that train you to get your CDL. I want to strictly drive flatbed for numerous reasons. Mainly to get my foot in the door and one day work up to specialized and oversized hauling. I have narrowed it down to TMC and Maverick.

Both companies appear to be well respected in the industry. Below are some differences between companies

TMC -Peterbilts -Specialized divisions for experienced drivers -No APUs installed in trucks -No minimum guarantee pay -Percentage pay 26%-34% (mileage is still an option) -Closest terminal Columbia, SC -Trucks governed at 62 -Rider age minimum 10 -1 year commitment -HQ in Des Moines, IA

MAVERICK -Freightliners -Also has glass and temp control divisions -APUs in the truck -Minimum weekly guarantee ($1,000 gross) -Closest terminal is Laurensburg, NC -Trucks governed at 65 -Rider age minimum 13 -2 year commitment -HQ in Little Rock, AR

Here's the simularitues: -Both run regional SW and Atlantic -Medical insurance is roughly the same for family plans -Both get you home most weekends -Most trucks are now automatics -Pay appears to be similar at the end of the week -Both allow me to use VA benefits for OJT

This is all from info I have gathered via Facebook groups, forums, and YouTube.

So I was wondering, what current and former drivers think about the company? Pros/cons? Why you stayed or left? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Tyler, it looks like you have a well thought out general plan and paid CDL company training is definitely the way to go.

I thought TMC trucks had APU’s ??? Maybe I’m mistaken, but in my opinion its a big advantage when you start driving.

Good luck and thank you for your service.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

I am separating from the military after 8 years of service. I did not do any driving in the military as I was a mechanic, so I am coming into the game with no CDL. I have a wife and a daughter and we own a couple of houses, so taking 8+ weeks with no pay to get my CDL is not an option. Because of this, I am looking at companies that train you to get your CDL. I want to strictly drive flatbed for numerous reasons. Mainly to get my foot in the door and one day work up to specialized and oversized hauling. I have narrowed it down to TMC and Maverick.

Both companies appear to be well respected in the industry. Below are some differences between companies

TMC -Peterbilts -Specialized divisions for experienced drivers -No APUs installed in trucks -No minimum guarantee pay -Percentage pay 26%-34% (mileage is still an option) -Closest terminal Columbia, SC -Trucks governed at 62 -Rider age minimum 10 -1 year commitment -HQ in Des Moines, IA

MAVERICK -Freightliners -Also has glass and temp control divisions -APUs in the truck -Minimum weekly guarantee ($1,000 gross) -Closest terminal is Laurensburg, NC -Trucks governed at 65 -Rider age minimum 13 -2 year commitment -HQ in Little Rock, AR

Here's the simularitues: -Both run regional SW and Atlantic -Medical insurance is roughly the same for family plans -Both get you home most weekends -Most trucks are now automatics -Pay appears to be similar at the end of the week -Both allow me to use VA benefits for OJT

This is all from info I have gathered via Facebook groups, forums, and YouTube.

So I was wondering, what current and former drivers think about the company? Pros/cons? Why you stayed or left? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Welcome Tyler, my suggestion is to use the search bar at the top of the page & type in each company's name with diary as the keyword. I know TT member solo works for TMC & from my understanding, their trucks don't have APU's. Maybe he can clarify.

Reading the diaries will give the best insight as to what to expect & how to be best prepared when you pull the trigger. From my limited experience reading on here? Both are solid companies. Good luck going forward & thank you for your service.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

With eight years complete, you should stay in for a dozen more and retire with the great benefits, especially medical.

Tyler K.'s Comment
member avatar

With eight years complete, you should stay in for a dozen more and retire with the great benefits, especially medical.

That has been a hot topic for my wife and I, but it has been taking a toll on our family. Believe it or not, I will have a more stable home life if I got out and did trucking. In the 8 years I've been in, I've been gone for 6 of those years. Been stationed at 6 different bases, 2 deployments, over 10 TDY's, and am deployed right now and just got picked up to do a year in Korea again. So it's time to hang up my hat.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Seabee-J's Comment
member avatar

Hello Tyler , Where in Korea ? I'm a reservist myself in the Navy ( Seabees ) and spent some time there and am heading back there this year . Anyway welcome aboard 👍!

Ken M. (TailGunner)'s Comment
member avatar

TMC only takes CDL students from select states in the midwest. But I think they sometimes make exceptions you'll have to contact them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Solo's Comment
member avatar

I wanted to correct you on the minimum pay as a %, unless I read the above incorrectly.

You will be paid at a minimum of 26% of the revenue generated to the truck, no less, for your first month.

Month 2 and beyond you could go up to 33%

To get 34%, you will have to put some years in w/ TMC to get enough snapshot points to get 34%.

You would not want to choose CPM over %, and I have the numbers to back that up, as I'm tracking every mile, every %, and every CPM, etc.

I'm in my 2nd month of Solo OTR w/ TMC, and you can read about my journey via the CDL School diaries for some additional info of what it's like get started out w/ them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Solo's Comment
member avatar

Tyler, it looks like you have a well thought out general plan and paid CDL company training is definitely the way to go.

I thought TMC trucks had APU’s ??? Maybe I’m mistaken, but in my opinion its a big advantage when you start driving.

Good luck and thank you for your service.

None of our trucks have APU's , and while they don't care if you idle, the lower MPG's will impact your snapshot and possibly cost you money.

Higher MPG's = higher points = (potenially) higher %pay

Some drivers run their trucks 24/7/365 and still get 32% pay.

I've been OTR w/ them for nearly 2 months now I guess, and have only idled my truck once...and while sitting here in Texas, I'm thinking tonight COULD be night #2.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Solo's Comment
member avatar

I have 0 regrets having decided to go w/ TMC, other than their no pet policy, and that will ultimately be the reason why I will depart after my year commitment is up, if not sooner. I will just have to find another flatbed company w/ a dog-friendly policy but will know TMC has set me up to be successful regardless of which company that may be.

The money you owe for the contract goes down every 3 months, so after 6 months, you only owe 2k (1k after 9 months), I'm not sure about Mavs.

I have talked to some Mav drivers that haul glass, and all appear to be happy w/ their day-to-day.

All-in-all, I'm sure either are fine choices, it will just come down to 1-2 things YOUR looking to get out of the industry and can either give you them or at least get you going in the right direction to help you obtain them.

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