Maverick Vs. TMC

Topic 25270 | Page 2

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Old School's Comment
member avatar
You would not want to choose CPM over %, and I have the numbers to back that up, as I'm tracking every mile, every %, and every CPM, etc.

Solo, you are brand new at this, and you started during a time when flat bed rates were pretty decent. You have one month of number crunching - that's not very credible evidence to base a decision on. Freight rates are extremely volatile at times, and there are market forces that move them up and down in very cyclical patterns. Be careful giving out advice like this. Even regions of the country vary considerably. After a couple of years of doing this, I'm fairly certain you'll find your numbers to indicate that there's very little difference in percentage pay and mileage pay. We had another TMC driver go through this same comparison and he found his pay would have been very similar no matter which way he went.

Ask yourself this question... Why would TMC offer you a choice of how you get paid, knowing full well that they are going to have to pay you a lot more if you choose the one they actively promote to their drivers? Percentage pay is actually designed to protect the company from the volatility of the rates. That's something you haven't had the pleasure of experiencing just yet.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Maverick technically runs epus , if that makes any difference to you.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Epus:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Tyler K.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Tyler , Where in Korea ? I'm a reservist myself in the Navy ( Seabees ) and spent some time there and am heading back there this year . Anyway welcome aboard 👍!

I spend a year and a half at Kunsan Air Base. It's about 3 hours south of Seoul on the west cost of the peninsula.

Tyler K.'s Comment
member avatar

I have 0 regrets having decided to go w/ TMC, other than their no pet policy, and that will ultimately be the reason why I will depart after my year commitment is up, if not sooner. I will just have to find another flatbed company w/ a dog-friendly policy but will know TMC has set me up to be successful regardless of which company that may be.

The money you owe for the contract goes down every 3 months, so after 6 months, you only owe 2k (1k after 9 months), I'm not sure about Mavs.

I have talked to some Mav drivers that haul glass, and all appear to be happy w/ their day-to-day.

All-in-all, I'm sure either are fine choices, it will just come down to 1-2 things YOUR looking to get out of the industry and can either give you them or at least get you going in the right direction to help you obtain them.

Thank you for the information. Without getting into too much detail, what's a reasonable expectation for a weekly gross income if I'm home on weekends? Are they pretty good with trying to get you home when requested?

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

To build a little on what Old School said, believe it or not (and no Tmc driver ever will), drivers at both companies make about the same. As an example, Solo was talking in another post about how his first month total averaged .54 cpm , not including bounce/deadhead. A maverick driver in his first month will make .54 cpm plus .02 cpm in bonus, including deadhead miles. We haul the same freight, from the same places, down the same lanes, to the same consignees, one of us with a black truck, one with a maroon.

The key to making money in regional flatbed is efficiency in loading/unloading, and being smart with your clock.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

TMC only takes CDL students from select states in the midwest. But I think they sometimes make exceptions you'll have to contact them.

They were recruiting at my school in the northeast.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
The key to making money in regional flatbed is efficiency in loading/unloading, and being smart with your clock.

That's it. Well said!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

I have 0 regrets having decided to go w/ TMC, other than their no pet policy, and that will ultimately be the reason why I will depart after my year commitment is up, if not sooner. I will just have to find another flatbed company w/ a dog-friendly policy but will know TMC has set me up to be successful regardless of which company that may be.

The money you owe for the contract goes down every 3 months, so after 6 months, you only owe 2k (1k after 9 months), I'm not sure about Mavs.

I have talked to some Mav drivers that haul glass, and all appear to be happy w/ their day-to-day.

All-in-all, I'm sure either are fine choices, it will just come down to 1-2 things YOUR looking to get out of the industry and can either give you them or at least get you going in the right direction to help you obtain them.

As an outside observer, why wouldn't you wait out the 2 year window that most specialized flatbed companies require to get hired on. If I were younger & just starting out in this field, that would be my goal. 130-150K a year for 80K miles is a great motivator.

I know you miss your baby but...

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry for late reply, but you can't really go wrong with either company. Do you want a black truck or a maroon truck? I was with maverick for over 2 years, and I would definitely recommend them. Of course I'm biased since I never worked for tmc but they're a reputable company as well. As far as pay, you'll do well with either company. Percentage can be great as long as the rates are decent but you have no control over that aspect. I like to know that I'll be paid as long as my wheels are turning. I was in the mid 60s cpm when I left and was very happy with the pay. Yes we had epus and fridges installed which was nice. I don't ever plan on going back to otr but maverick is the only place I'd consider if I had to go back out.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Epus:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Tyler K.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry for late reply, but you can't really go wrong with either company. Do you want a black truck or a maroon truck? I was with maverick for over 2 years, and I would definitely recommend them. Of course I'm biased since I never worked for tmc but they're a reputable company as well. As far as pay, you'll do well with either company. Percentage can be great as long as the rates are decent but you have no control over that aspect. I like to know that I'll be paid as long as my wheels are turning. I was in the mid 60s cpm when I left and was very happy with the pay. Yes we had epus and fridges installed which was nice. I don't ever plan on going back to otr but maverick is the only place I'd consider if I had to go back out.

What do you do now? My ultimate goal is to get into heavy or specialized hauling. There seem to be a lot of those companies in Western North Carolina. I want to do a few years flatbed first to get the experience, comfortable behind the wheel, and learn the trade.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Epus:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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