Backing Problem With AutoShift Trans

Topic 25412 | Page 2

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Susan D. 's Comment
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We go to some really screwed up places.. how about backing uphill and its slanted to the side too. Yup, I've had to shut off my truck and restart it to get it to move and any uphill backing I get these "clutch overheating " warnings. It's a pita for sure. My old Volvo autoshift never did this crap. Never had problems in my cascadia manual. Last night I happened to park directly in front of my cascadia ('16) truck. All I could think about was how much I miss it. If I didn't hate switching trucks so much, I'd have told them I was moving back into it lol.

Steve's Comment
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Don't know if I have a lot to add, but when I drove linehaul and had to "slip seat", there was a big difference from truck to truck, even though they were the same make/model/year. One tip to try is keeping the RPMs up with your throttle, and using your left foot on the brake to control your speed. This may not be a "manufacturer's recommended" technique, and may lead to the clutch overheating message Susan mentioned, but it could help in some situations.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Hobo's Comment
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Steve, I've had to resort to that a couple of times on 90 backs. I don't like doing it though, the brakes on this truck are almost as touchy as the accelerator.

RealDiehl's Comment
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I upgraded after orientation a couple of days ago and the tractor I was assigned has a push button autoshift trans. Today I had to back 4 times, this truck will not creep, when I let my foot off the brake it doesn't move and when I hit the accelerator it lurches big time. There doesn't seem to be any in between with this truck.

Is this normal or do I just not have the right touch with it yet?

Ah, Hobo, I feel your pain. I have a 2018 International and it does the same thing. My first truck, a 2016 Peterbilt, also had that problem. It's pretty alarming when trying to back into tight spots and it suddenly lurches backward. Have your wheels spun too? That will also happen, especially when you're not backing straight. Just take it nice and easy. Who cares if other drivers are looking at you like you don't know what you're doing when you back up a few feet then roll forward a few feet as you ease up on the accelerator. It's a big pain in the butt, I know! Just try to be patient with it.

Rob T.'s Comment
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I dealt with something similar last week. I slip seat and drive a mix of Freightliners, KW, international and Volvo. The volvos are by far my favorite because I've not dealt with that. The 2016 kenworths we have are a huge pain backing because of their lack of creep mode and clutch overheating. When I get back to the yard after i scan my badge I'm automatically assigned a pad # to put my trailer. I was given one I've not had much problems with in the past, pretty tight on the sides but has diagonal parking in front of it. The KW would lurch all over and it really sucked. It seriously took 15 minutes to finally get it backed in. I had to keep stopping as well due to clutch overheating warning. One of the yard dogs was nearby and offered to put it in their since he knows how the KW we have are but I declined the offer as I may have to back into a tight spot at a backhaul and it did me some good to deal with it at our yard. Atleast if I'd hit something in our yard it would've been our own equipment and less hassle to deal with.

Matthew W.'s Comment
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There is a feature on the newer autoshift trucks called hsa(Hill start assist). What this does is when you press the breaks firmly and then release it holds the breaks for an extra second before releasing them so if you are on a hill it gives you time to move from break to fuel pedal without the truck rolling backwards on you. This might be what is causing you guy's lurching issues. If so, just wait a tiny bit after releasing the break petal before giving fuel and begining your backing maneuver. Or, there is a button on your dash to disable the feature temporarily. It looks like a truck going up hill with a circle around it and line through it. Hope this helps you guys, I'm in a 2017 10 speed pete so dont have to deal with autos yet.

RealDiehl's Comment
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I think ya jinxed me Hobo! This was my backing situation today. The door is too high so my rear tandems had to sit on these ramps. I tried a couple times to propel myself up on them with a little momentum and couldn't get the wheels up there far enough. On my final attempt I had a little too much momentum and nearly gave myself whiplash slamming into the door. Even without the wonky reverse of an International it may have been a challenge.

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Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Noob_Driver's Comment
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My trainer has a 2018 kenworth t680 and i have the same problems. Ive finally figured out the feathering issue on it for the most part, i do sometimes roll a bit here and there then and it does sometimes fly on me especially on 90s when the trailer has a bigger kink. I can do 45s all day with no problems. The bigger issue is the fuel pedal sticks. Not like sticks down and doesn't release but it clicks. It seems like in wet or humid conditions the pedal wont go down without a good amount of resistance from it. Then once you give more pressure it clicks and you give more pressure then you wanted so you shoot back. I had a 90 at miller yesterday in Milwaukee in the rain uphill that took about 20 minutes fighting that damn pedal. Anyone else have that issue with the pedal?

Don's Comment
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I have found no leeching or any other issues when backing in the Mack Pinnacle's with auto trans. For myself, it is about the throttle control and brake use "single foot two-step".

RealDiehl's Comment
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I have found no leeching or any other issues when backing in the Mack Pinnacle's with auto trans. For myself, it is about the throttle control and brake use "single foot two-step".

Sounds great. Unfortunately with certain year/model trucks it's impossible to control. You try to feather it and press ever so gradually down on the accelerator. For a couple seconds it is: nothing...nothing...nothing, and then VROOM!

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