A Walk On The ‘Darkside’ - Working For A Small Company

Topic 25544 | Page 6

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PJ's Comment
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Pat I wish you the best. I know what you are going through. I worked for a small private fleet for 18 months. Overall it was a good experience. And I also understand your log system very well, enough said. Be safe

LDRSHIP's Comment
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It is going ok. The only part that is annoying is, every time a repair is needed listening to the Boss man complain. Then try to find the cheapest half fix he can. It is what it is though.

Slim's Comment
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LDRSHIP - Thanks for posting on this topic.

I have worked for two different small companies as a company driver. The first one was a good company. The second and current company I just started with a few weeks ago, so we'll see how things shake out.

With small companies it's important to do your homework- - Look up safety records - Interview the company - For example, I will speak with the safety director and the shop manager when visiting the company. It's also an opportunity for the company to get to know you.

As in most endeavors, the more information you can gather the better.

I'm currently driving for Quality Logistics LLC out of Englewood, Co They have been in business since 1959, are debt free, have good accounts and run late model Volvos.

Hope this helps.

It is going ok. The only part that is annoying is, every time a repair is needed listening to the Boss man complain. Then try to find the cheapest half fix he can. It is what it is though.

LDRSHIP's Comment
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The small company I am working for just jumped into the big truck game last August. They haven’t even got a year under their belt. It is ran by 2 people. The only “employees” are us drivers. I get to witness the trials and tribulations of an upstart trying to make it. A lot more raw then though small companies that have been in the game for more than a few years.

Army 's Comment
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LDRSHIP

I could scroll the pages on this but I don’t recall hearing, how is the pay versus your previous company?

LDRSHIP's Comment
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LDRSHIP

I could scroll the pages on this but I don’t recall hearing, how is the pay versus your previous company?

I get pd 55cpm loaded and $20/hr deadhead. But forget accessorial pays. Not unless the broker is willing to pay. Then any accessorial pays get split 50/50. But the key is if and how much the broker is willing to pay.

No Bennies such as insurance, 401k, etc..

At Wolding I made 42 cpm on all dispatched miles (practical miles). Plus I made 1 cpm every quarter for safety and 4.5 cpm mileage bonus every quarter. So figure 47.5 cpm. Plus access to 401k, health benefits and per diem.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Army 's Comment
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Thanks... are you using the VA for insurance?

LDRSHIP's Comment
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I do have health insurance thru the VA. But it only covers me. My wife is SOL right now.

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
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Wow, flashing back to my "paying my dues" first employment in this career. Bending space and time to accomplish unrealistic delivery schedules, 'creative writing' on the log books, an informal DVIR process and half-arsed repairs. Yep - BT-DT-GTT.

Just a reminder - if you use a mobile phone, GPS, or pass any license plate recognition equipped cameras or cop cars, there is a digital record of your Lat/Long/Time stamp. Should some blue-hair decide to drive under your trailer tandems and pass over the rainbow bridge, all of those electronics will get grabbed and used to convict you (worst case scenario) for Reckless Homicide.

LRDSHIP, I don't envy you for the position you find yourself in. Good luck to you.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Wow, flashing back to my "paying my dues" first employment in this career. Bending space and time to accomplish unrealistic delivery schedules, 'creative writing' on the log books, an informal DVIR process and half-arsed repairs. Yep - BT-DT-GTT.

Just a reminder - if you use a mobile phone, GPS, or pass any license plate recognition equipped cameras or cop cars, there is a digital record of your Lat/Long/Time stamp. Should some blue-hair decide to drive under your trailer tandems and pass over the rainbow bridge, all of those electronics will get grabbed and used to convict you (worst case scenario) for Reckless Homicide.

LRDSHIP, I don't envy you for the position you find yourself in. Good luck to you.

With freight rates down and Boss man looking for something that pays decent, there isn’t too much bending of the space time continuum.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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