New Driver. Needs Help

Topic 25631 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Chris H.'s Comment
member avatar

Evening truckers. Im sure this has been asked a million times on here, but I'm going to ask again. I am brand new to trucking. This is my 2nd week with a trainer OTR and while I've always driven for a living, tow truck/school bus I am not used to driving such long hours everyday.

My concern is when I wake up I'm refreshed and ready to go, but within 30 mins of heading down the road I feel mentally exhausted as to where I can close my eyes for a split 2nd. I feel like I havent slept in days. im really worried about it that it will be an on going thing or is this something new drivers go through? And if so, how to beat it?! We been driving in the AM (which I hate getting up early.) But as soon as I'm not driving..such as taking my 10 hour (like now) I feel wide awake.

I have many more concerns such as backing and others but those can be discussed later...

HELP!!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

I sometimes get like that. What I usually do in that situation, is to find the nearest safe and legal parking, send a message to my load planner, and take a 30 minute nap. This technically fulfills the 30 minute rule, but keep in mind, another 30 will be required.

I will also park, get out of the truck and walk around for a bit.

I do drink coffee, and I try to not use any additional energy boosters, but sometimes they will get me through.

Talk to your trainer, ask their advice, too. He or she wants you to be as safe as possible, too, and will give you his/her own advice.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Evening truckers. Im sure this has been asked a million times on here, but I'm going to ask again. I am brand new to trucking. This is my 2nd week with a trainer OTR and while I've always driven for a living, tow truck/school bus I am not used to driving such long hours everyday.

My concern is when I wake up I'm refreshed and ready to go, but within 30 mins of heading down the road I feel mentally exhausted as to where I can close my eyes for a split 2nd. I feel like I havent slept in days. im really worried about it that it will be an on going thing or is this something new drivers go through? And if so, how to beat it?! We been driving in the AM (which I hate getting up early.) But as soon as I'm not driving..such as taking my 10 hour (like now) I feel wide awake.

I have many more concerns such as backing and others but those can be discussed later...

HELP!!

That used to happen to me when I was driving 5 ton trucks as a crew leader for a construction company. I was sleeping around 6 hours a night. Felt fine I thought. Wrong. There's this thing called sleep debt. It means that every hour you miss hangs over your head day after day. They say one night of not sleeping 7.5-8 hours (really sleeping) reduces your cognitive ability by like %30 or something. Don't quote me but it's close. My guess is either sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality or diet.

Are you eating/drinking a lot of carbs/sugar? Have you ever had a sleep study done? Do you sleep like a rock or toss and turn? Do you snore?

If you get a few days of 8 hour sleep nights, real restful sleep, you should be fine. I swear I had the same exact problem. It was the weirdest thing. I would feel sleepy and have someone else drive, then I would sit in the passenger seat wide awake.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

You have to get your sleep. When I was with my trainer I only had 6 hours off between shifts. I had to get in the hotel shower eat watch tv and sleep and then be back in the truck before the 6 hours were complete. I didn’t get enough sleep and was a zombie. I felt like I would never make it but I couldn’t give up because I put all my eggs into this one basket. I thought the same thing as you that this was going to be my life for ever and ever. It is not like this when you get on your own. Right now your running with a trainer. This guy is getting miles. He’s a seasone veteran who can go the distance and make it look easy. When you get on your own they won’t be treating you like a veteran driver. The company will put training wheels on you and let you run at your own pace until you gain the stamina and endurance of a long haul trucker. Short miles long waits for your next load and all the crap that comes with being the low man on the todem pole. You will make it.

Chris H.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Evening truckers. Im sure this has been asked a million times on here, but I'm going to ask again. I am brand new to trucking. This is my 2nd week with a trainer OTR and while I've always driven for a living, tow truck/school bus I am not used to driving such long hours everyday.

My concern is when I wake up I'm refreshed and ready to go, but within 30 mins of heading down the road I feel mentally exhausted as to where I can close my eyes for a split 2nd. I feel like I havent slept in days. im really worried about it that it will be an on going thing or is this something new drivers go through? And if so, how to beat it?! We been driving in the AM (which I hate getting up early.) But as soon as I'm not driving..such as taking my 10 hour (like now) I feel wide awake.

I have many more concerns such as backing and others but those can be discussed later...

HELP!!

double-quotes-end.png

That used to happen to me when I was driving 5 ton trucks as a crew leader for a construction company. I was sleeping around 6 hours a night. Felt fine I thought. Wrong. There's this thing called sleep debt. It means that every hour you miss hangs over your head day after day. They say one night of not sleeping 7.5-8 hours (really sleeping) reduces your cognitive ability by like %30 or something. Don't quote me but it's close. My guess is either sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality or diet.

Are you eating/drinking a lot of carbs/sugar? Have you ever had a sleep study done? Do you sleep like a rock or toss and turn? Do you snore?

If you get a few days of 8 hour sleep nights, real restful sleep, you should be fine. I swear I had the same exact problem. It was the weirdest thing. I would feel sleepy and have someone else drive, then I would sit in the passenger seat wide awake.

I dont snore. I usually get 6-7 hrs sleep, but I'm not used to sleeping in a sleeper cab, especially top bunk so yea I toss and turn. my trainer snores. He uses a CPAP machine. I drunk a Monster...which I usually don't do because the high caffeine usually makes me have a panic attack but it really helped. I had a KickStart in the AM and it did nothing. When I went home on Saturday I slept almost 9.5 nonstop hours. 😟😟

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPAP:

Constant Positive Airway Pressure

CPAP is a breathing assist device which is worn over the mouth or nose. It provides nighttime relief for individuals who suffer from Sleep Apnea.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Sleep as much as you can when you can during your break, but also rest at other times, too. Waiting for a dispatch, waiting to get unloaded, etc. It will take many months for your body and mind to get the hang of sitting and driving for these extended hours that we are required out here.

Pouges's Comment
member avatar

This is pretty informative. Via Podcast Addict app.

0361217001558398856.jpg

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More