Does Roehl Charge Tuition If You Fail Your CDL Exam?

Topic 25766 | Page 1

Page 1 of 13 Next Page Go To Page:
Chris M.'s Comment
member avatar

So I was reading a post from Avvatar that he went through Roehl Transport paid CDL training and didn't pass the driving portion and never received his CDL. From what I've been reading he will still have to pay the 7k, If that is true that is ridiculous! And have me second guessing going with roehl. I will have to call them and ask, and if that's the case I mind as well either go with another company or pay for my own schooling instead.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Army 's Comment
member avatar

I think Doug had a similar experience but check his diary blog. Recent within the past 2(ish) weeks.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

So I was reading a post from Avvatar that he went to roehl and didn't pass the driving portion and never received his CDL. From what I've been reading he will still have to pay the 7k, If that is true that is ridiculous! And have me second guessing going with roehl. I will have to call them and ask, and if that's the case I mind as well either go with another company or pay for my own schooling instead.

Oh yes, Roehl will want it all. I know several wannabe drivers that washed out and the full tuition amount went straight to a collection agency in less than a week.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big T's Comment
member avatar

Why wouldn't they charge you? They provide the time, instruction, and equipment regardless of whether or not you passed. If you were taking a college course you would pay for the classes you took even if you ended up not graduating.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Why wouldn't they charge you? They provide the time, instruction, and equipment regardless of whether or not you passed. If you were taking a college course you would pay for the classes you took even if you ended up not graduating.

Exactly. It is a legal, binding contract that a student signs.

Chris M.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah I guess. But 7k is a bit too steep. My community college charges 3.5k for a 10 week class. That might be the better route.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

And you’re missing the whole thing we emphasize here. A private school or a CC will train you to the point of getting a CDL and then what? They have no vested interest other than getting paid to do a service. They will not land you a job as a company based training OJT program will. In addition, most companies will reimburse you after a year for the tuition cost that they footed the bill for, so the training ends up costing you zero dollars.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I guess. But 7k is a bit too steep. My community college charges 3.5k for a 10 week class. That might be the better route.

Think so?

They will gladly take your money, however there is no vested interest in you passing. You’ll still need to find a job then...

Wash-outs happen. Typically though a result of failed physical, non-disclosure of a background issue, failed drug test and lack of effort/commitment.

Choose wisely, unemotionally and enter school with a positive attitude with zero distractions...

Why We Advise Company Sponsored Training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

There are many other reputable companies that offer paid cdl training, and after you get the permit and head out, start making money. Why wait a couple of months at a community college when you could almost be done with training. After CC, you would still have to find a job, and do more training with them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

If you're intent on being a driver and willing to work hard for at least a year then there is no need to worry about the 7000. This site has already beat to death the reasons to go to a company sponsored school so read that info g town posted.

As for Roehl, I'm starting my third month solo and even with the slow freight at this time of year i am still averaging good miles. I went solo the last week of February and am almost at 33000 miles as i type this. My paychecks have been between 700-1100 throughout that time and I've had 14 or 15 days of home time. I took off 7 days two weeks ago, 5 the previous month and 2 or 3 the week after first getting my truck. I should add my paycheck for the full week of home time was only 200 and some dollars because i had a day and a half of running at the beginning of that week.

I run for a month or more, but a friend of mine who runs regional (5 days on, 2 days off) is making the same or more miles and pay. He had a 3100 mile week last month and is new like me.

Go with a company program like everyone on here recommends and just worry about working your butt off safely the first year... Not money you won't have to pay back as long as you stay committed.

I have no regrets going with Roehl and don't worry about the 7000.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Page 1 of 13 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More