Question About Functional External Light Inspection.

Topic 25835 | Page 2

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Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Is there any truth to this? I have always put my foot on the service brakes before releasing the parking brakes

The Illinois book said the same thing so i asked my father according to him that is outdated modern trucks it wont hurt, now if you end up driving something older 1990 or older then do not do it.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

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Is there any truth to this? I have always put my foot on the service brakes before releasing the parking brakes

double-quotes-end.png

The Illinois book said the same thing so i asked my father according to him that is outdated modern trucks it wont hurt, now if you end up driving something older 1990 or older then do not do it.

Many of the state drivers manuals say that. Dated. I agree with your Dad, unless of course the brake system is in need of maintenance. Err on the side of caution...

Besides BB, you are experienced...touching the service brake accidentally while parked is the only time I can think of this could occur.

But as a rule I’ll bet you’ve never had a reason to knowingly push the service brake while you are parked.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Donna M.'s Comment
member avatar

Do forget both the red and yellow knobs need to be in when u start brake test, so when u fan down the brakes they will pop out. Had examiner tell me this is the most “missed” thing on a brake test.

MikeD1982's Comment
member avatar

Thanks all for the responses to my questions. I am lastly curious about the order of the brake tests...

1) With respect to the air brake test, what is the order of the steps you should perform it in? Is it, with the wheels chocked, the key in the electrical position, the parking brake released, and a full tank of air A) static leak test (after initial pressure loss, not losing more than 2 PSI on a straight truck over 60 seconds ) B) applied leak test (after initial pressure loss, not losing more than 3 PSI with the service brake applied for 60 seconds) C) audible and visual low warning indicator test (fanning to ~60 PSI) D) spring brake reapplies/pop out test (fanning ~20-40 PSI)

With spring brake re-applied

E) air pressure rebuild test, timing from 85-100 PSI, not to exceed 45 seconds?

F) governor cut in and cut out check? (100 & 120-140 PSI, respectively)

2) In terms of the brake tests (parking, service, air), is there a certain sequence you have to perform them in (e.g. you must do the parking brake check first, followed by air, then service) or can you perform them in whichever order you prefer on the test?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

MikeD1982 wants to know...

1) With respect to the air brake test, what is the order of the steps you should perform it in? Is it, with the wheels chocked, the key in the electrical position, the parking brake released, and a full tank of air A) static leak test (after initial pressure loss, not losing more than 2 PSI on a straight truck over 60 seconds ) B) applied leak test (after initial pressure loss, not losing more than 3 PSI with the service brake applied for 60 seconds) C) audible and visual low warning indicator test (fanning to ~60 PSI) D) spring brake reapplies/pop out test (fanning ~20-40 PSI)

With spring brake re-applied

E) air pressure rebuild test, timing from 85-100 PSI, not to exceed 45 seconds?

F) governor cut in and cut out check? (100 & 120-140 PSI, respectively)

2) In terms of the brake tests (parking, service, air), is there a certain sequence you have to perform them in (e.g. you must do the parking brake check first, followed by air, then service) or can you perform them in whichever order you prefer on the test?

Invest some time in these links:

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
MikeD1982's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for the links; I have given them a look in the past...definitely helpful materials; however, I just want to know if it is mandatory that you, for example, do the parking brake test first (as is suggested in Daniel's manual), or if you can choose to do the air tests first, then finish off with parking & service...basically doing them in the order which works best for you? Reason being, is use acronyms or mnemonic devices to help me remember what to do with these brake tests. It may sound stupid, but I use the acronym SALSA GPS for the various tests, respective to the brakes.

S: Static air loss -- Key ON/engine OFF/Parking brake released -- wheels chocked A: Applied air loss -- Key ON/engine OFF/PB released -- wheels chocked L: Low pressure warning signals -- Key ON/engine OFF/PB released -- wheels chocked S: Spring brake application -- Key ON/engine OFF/PB still released but should pop out if test is performed properly -- wheels chocked A: Air pressure rebuild -- remove key, retrieve chocks...parking brake is already engaged from spring brake test...safe start; build up to 85 PSI and time how long it takes to get to 100 PSI...no more than 45 secs.

G: Governor cut in/cut out (100 PSI cut in/120-140 PSI cut out) -- Engine fully on...parking brake engaged. P: Parking brake test -- Engine fully on...parking brake engaged...truck is in D...gently tug on accelerator and vehicle shouldn't move S: Service Brake test -- Engine fully on...disengage parking brake...vehicle is in D...move forward at 5 mph and at a distance of ~5 to ~10 feet...apply service brake...vehicle should come to a complete and straight stop...no left or right shifting...apply parking brake and return vehicle into neutral.

Just trying to gain any advantage I can over these tests.

MikeD1982 wants to know...

double-quotes-start.png

1) With respect to the air brake test, what is the order of the steps you should perform it in? Is it, with the wheels chocked, the key in the electrical position, the parking brake released, and a full tank of air A) static leak test (after initial pressure loss, not losing more than 2 PSI on a straight truck over 60 seconds ) B) applied leak test (after initial pressure loss, not losing more than 3 PSI with the service brake applied for 60 seconds) C) audible and visual low warning indicator test (fanning to ~60 PSI) D) spring brake reapplies/pop out test (fanning ~20-40 PSI)

With spring brake re-applied

E) air pressure rebuild test, timing from 85-100 PSI, not to exceed 45 seconds?

F) governor cut in and cut out check? (100 & 120-140 PSI, respectively)

2) In terms of the brake tests (parking, service, air), is there a certain sequence you have to perform them in (e.g. you must do the parking brake check first, followed by air, then service) or can you perform them in whichever order you prefer on the test?

double-quotes-end.png

Invest some time in these links:

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

Mike, if you're in a school, follow the steps as instructed by the school. They will have a pretty good handle on what the inspectors are going to look for, what order they want, etc. If you're getting OJT, then get a copy of the state's "PreTrip Inspection Protocol" for Rhode Island, probably available as pdf on line. Follow that, if you're asked by the feller/gal in the hat why you went that way, you can tell them you followed the outline provided by Rhode Island in "(insert name of document here)". It will show that you're following a protocol rather than winging it...

Using the acronyms to remember stuff is a great tool...

Keep on keeping on!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Not sure how your state is but in ILLINOIS they would ask you the tests in a random order to make sure you knew them and did not have them memorized. I agree go in which ever order your instructors say they will know what the examiner wants.

MikeD1982's Comment
member avatar

Called the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI), which is the institution that administers the CDL road test; the state's CDL coordinator told me that you can perform the brake tests in any order, but she suggests doing parking brakes, service brakes, and closing with air brakes.

Additionally, I ended up registering for a CDL Road Test prep class at CCRI, which is taught by the same coordinator; it was $84 (didn't think that was a bad price). She said it is beneficial in that it'll tell students the exam set up, what to do, what the examiner is looking for, etc...She said the CDL manual offered on the state's DMV website is a little outdated, and they've made some changes, but the class addresses these changes. Additionally, she said it's mandatory to chock the wheels on the air brake test, even though the manual says (in section 11 -- pre-trip) that you only need to do so if you're on an incline. It can't hurt to attend the class, I guess.

I figure this will be informative class; it'll help me to know what the state examiner is looking for, and how to go about doing it...and it's coming directly from a CDL state examiner's mouth.

Thanks for all the help in this thread...much appreciated.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Or you could do the High Road Training Program on here for free, then go ace the test.good-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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