Prime Simulator Program

Topic 25873 | Page 1

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JJlearner's Comment
member avatar

Why no one is mentioning about this simulator program at Prime...When I was doing my research I learned that students have to pass simulator test before going for PSD. But recruiters, fleet manager or experienced prime drivers didn't mention anything about how Prime wants students to pass simulator backing test when students try to upgrade after their TNT. I passed that simulator test in my 1st try but the guy who went after me failed twice and he has to go back on road for another 15k miles or something. Working in gaming and designing for 20 plus years I can tell that it is not even 30% close to real life driving. Then why are they make people to do that. I can under stand the idea of practicing on a simulator before getting in a truck. But not letting to upgrade someone who already has a CDL and 30k experience because they are not good with 2d gaming is not a great thing. I just feel bad for that kid and I wonder why they are doing that. May be I am wrong, Would love to hear from experienced drivers.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I haven't been on that simulator, but I have spent a ton of time on flight simulators. Simulators are great for certain things, and terrible for others. The biggest thing a simulator can do is to help teach good safety habits.

For instance, you can teach someone how to approach a busy and complex intersection. You can teach someone how to keep a good following distance or check their mirrors thoroughly before changing lanes.

Simulators are not good for teaching someone things that require a "feel" for the road, like how to handle a truck on slick roads. Without the physical feedback it's nearly impossible for a simulator to be effective.

I suspect Prime is trying to see if people are using good habits during the use of the simulator and demonstrating the basic skills required. Are they checking their mirrors constantly? Are they attempting to make the setup for backing properly? Do they appear to be comfortable and relaxed behind the wheel?

I do get what you're saying. A simulator can be tough to use. But I suspect Prime's instructors are looking for specific behaviors and some level of comfort and confidence from the drivers. A really experienced driver can tell instinctively when someone is ready for the next phase or if they still need more work in their current phase.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I think Brett provided a ton of good information.

I’ve been on simulators many times and although I agree they are no where near what it’s like to experience the real thing...because frankly they are much easier.

I’d suggest the inverse is what is relevant; with 30,000 miles of experience and a valid CDL , passing a simulator test should be a breeze.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
JJlearner's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Brett and G- Town for your detailed responses. I appreciate it and agree with you guys

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

As a Prime trainer I can tell you they are looking for several things... in addition to you checking mirrors, reading signs (i have seen people hit low clearance bridges or over the weight limit roads), going for pull through parking spaces rather than backing into a space (surverying the area before attempting), your reaction to fog, boxes flying and animals, your speeds...

they also observed if you GOAL, which you can do by viewing an areial shot. When it comes to the amount of miles added, it used to be determined by your record OTR. If someone did poorly in the class and got a hard brake, more time may be added than if he had simply failed the class.

One of the reasons most people do not talk about these classes is that #1 they are MUCH easier now that they are all automatics and not.manuals. #2 The classes are really simple. Most people do not fail. But quite a few are sent home for not taking them seriously. Anyone who treats it like a video game and acts like a 12 year old by crashing into things gets sent home.

Prime didnt spend $10 Million on those SIMs for no reason. Wally even tells the classes "I kmow they are not the same as trucks, they arent meant to be".

Good luck on your upgrade

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
JJlearner's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Rainy

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