FedEx Freight Driver Apprentice

Topic 25933 | Page 8

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Dennis R.'s Comment
member avatar

Great info Banks !!!!!!!!!

I will be following for sure. Hoping to get into trucking too when I get back to the states. I like the way you go into detail. Hope all goes well and seems like you are doing fine.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Great info Banks !!!!!!!!!

I will be following for sure. Hoping to get into trucking too when I get back to the states. I like the way you go into detail. Hope all goes well and seems like you are doing fine.

I'm glad you're enjoying it. I'm enjoying it a lot. If you have any questions I'll do my best to answer them and if I don't know, I'll find an answer for you.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

One thing that stood out to me was, FedEx not allowing you to push dollies, we are allowed to but I trybto avoid it as it sucks at times to push them.

Another other thing that stood out to me was not teaching guys to line up a set by using the tires to rail method, that is how I was tought. In fact I was going to do that way but you already figured it out, it really is the easiest and fastest way to line up.

If you have any question ill be glad to help if I can

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar

One thing that stood out to me was, FedEx not allowing you to push dollies, we are allowed to but I trybto avoid it as it sucks at times to push them.

Another other thing that stood out to me was not teaching guys to line up a set by using the tires to rail method, that is how I was tought. In fact I was going to do that way but you already figured it out, it really is the easiest and fastest way to line up.

If you have any question ill be glad to help if I can

I understand the logic in creating a policy. I'm guessing a lot of people got hurt trying to move them. I've seen people do it, but since I'm a FedEx student and I wasn't taught to do it that way, it's most likely a write up.

I don't understand why they wouldn't just let me line up the tires. It's hard to line up walls because things disappear as you move in reverse, but I can always see the tires.

I appreciate the offer, Bob. I'm definitely keep it in mind.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dennis R.'s Comment
member avatar

This whole post is very interesting , great details !. .... Maybe I should check with FedEx in Indianapolis ??? Hmmmm

Banks's Comment
member avatar

This whole post is very interesting , great details !. .... Maybe I should check with FedEx in Indianapolis ??? Hmmmm

You can, it's a great company and I have no complaints. Just keep in mind that its all seniority based. You will get the scraps nobody wants and nobody wants them for a reason. Or you can just get stuck on the dock until they need you. They may not need you. My mentor went just under a year without driving his first year. The guys that do linehaul or road runs have been there for years and built up the seniority to get in they group, but now there at the bottom of that list. That means erratic hours, long hours and weekends. Also, not driving when they tell you to isn't an option. If it's snowing and they're running you're going out if they need you to. Which means you can end up at a truck stop would no sleeper. If you can get to a hotel, they'll pay for it. If you can't, that's tough. I've spoken to guys that have sat on at truck stops for 12 to 24 hours waiting for the interstate to open.

Right now I'm back to over night dock life. That's 5- 8 hour shifts with some runs thrown in. That's the shift nobody wants, that's how I ended up with it. Bottom of the totem pole. I'm all the way at the bottom so I didn't even get to bid. They said "this is what's left so this is what you're doing". I'm ok with that. I'm in this for the long haul and I'm only 34. That's a decent long haul. I don't think I would to get into LTL close to retirement.

The days with my mentor were all 10 to 13 hour days. Very hard physical labor. Moving pallets around and at some locations having to carry heavy freight off the truck. Nothing about this is adventurous or fun. For me it was about wanting to get out of a warehouse and doing something that I can take with me even if I'm no longer with the company. My goal was to be OTR for the adventure aspect of it. Regional was my back up for home time and LTL is where I landed because I have to be home for personal reasons. At some point when I have some more flexibility (when the kids are grown and home is more stable) I'd like to follow through and go OTR.

If you're looking for an adventure or to see new things. LTL isn't the place for it. Doing LTL you see the same things you can see by driving around in your car for a few hours and that's it.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Dennis before you said you where looking for adventure if so LTL probably isnt the best fit for you then. Banks described it pretty well.

OD does offer what they call "wild drivers" who are out for 5 days and spend their nights in a hotel but even that gets to be repetitive as there are only so many places to go.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

This whole post is very interesting , great details !. .... Maybe I should check with FedEx in Indianapolis ??? Hmmmm

double-quotes-end.png

You can, it's a great company and I have no complaints. Just keep in mind that its all seniority based. You will get the scraps nobody wants and nobody wants them for a reason. Or you can just get stuck on the dock until they need you. They may not need you. My mentor went just under a year without driving his first year. The guys that do linehaul or road runs have been there for years and built up the seniority to get in they group, but now there at the bottom of that list. That means erratic hours, long hours and weekends. Also, not driving when they tell you to isn't an option. If it's snowing and they're running you're going out if they need you to. Which means you can end up at a truck stop would no sleeper. If you can get to a hotel, they'll pay for it. If you can't, that's tough. I've spoken to guys that have sat on at truck stops for 12 to 24 hours waiting for the interstate to open.

Right now I'm back to over night dock life. That's 5- 8 hour shifts with some runs thrown in. That's the shift nobody wants, that's how I ended up with it. Bottom of the totem pole. I'm all the way at the bottom so I didn't even get to bid. They said "this is what's left so this is what you're doing". I'm ok with that. I'm in this for the long haul and I'm only 34. That's a decent long haul. I don't think I would to get into LTL close to retirement.

The days with my mentor were all 10 to 13 hour days. Very hard physical labor. Moving pallets around and at some locations having to carry heavy freight off the truck. Nothing about this is adventurous or fun. For me it was about wanting to get out of a warehouse and doing something that I can take with me even if I'm no longer with the company. My goal was to be OTR for the adventure aspect of it. Regional was my back up for home time and LTL is where I landed because I have to be home for personal reasons. At some point when I have some more flexibility (when the kids are grown and home is more stable) I'd like to follow through and go OTR.

If you're looking for an adventure or to see new things. LTL isn't the place for it. Doing LTL you see the same things you can see by driving around in your car for a few hours and that's it.

Very nice write-up, Banks. Somehow I completely missed that you were going through the program. Nice job, btw.

0200 is a weird start time. Not sure where the bulk of your freight goes but I'm sure it's to cover for a reason. If you want, make sure your immediate supervisor / Road dispatch knows that you are always willing to come in early for a road run. Bug them. I stop by my Road dispatch office every morning joking that they don't love me anymore. Yes, it's all driven by seniority but it doesn't hurt that they know your name :)

NEVER turn down a run. Not likely as you're low man but if you run when and wherever they ask they'll remember that.

They may use you anyhow but let the inbound supervisor know you're willing to run the city in the morning. I would think that 0200 would be a great shift to pick up OT because if the city's short they'll put you in the plan and run you to 10 or 12 hours a day.

And if being a road driver is your plan, keep an eye out on the internal job openings and put in for one when they happen. You sound like you're at a big barn so I would stay there. More opportunities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar

There's only 2 of us with a 0200 start time. We load city trailers and take road runs when he have to. If I have to load trailers, I prefer city. No decks and no stacking. I got a chance to speak to the guy that did the shift before (he went to road). He said he would go out at least 2 nights a week, but sometimes it would be after working the dock 4 or 5 hours.

Thanks for the tip, I'll definitely make it a point to stop by road and city to bug them. I also see it as having some overtime opportunity. At the very least, I'll be able to pad my check with the road runs.

I'm packing a bag to keep in my car for when I do have to go out. In it I have a change of clothes (in case I get stuck), gloves, a blanket, a tire gauge, rubber grommets and my medical card, is there anything I'm missing?

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Toiletries, flashlight, some non-perishable foods, and some bottled water.

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