Kingpin Laws

Topic 25937 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Dan 67 wrote:

Majority of newer trailers have a 3" from the trailer nose to the center of the kingpin. So with a tap measure.. 9' from the rear of the trailer is 41' from kingpin. Use a thick sharpy and mark it. And yes the scale house computers take pictures and determine your measurements.

KingPin is 3' (not 3") from the edge of the trailer front. This has been a "standard" for 53' trailers since national adoption in the early 90s. Marc, the movable, adjustable fifth-wheel has no bearing on this at all, distance for setting the tandem is measured from the KingPin which is fixed.

The 41' mark is only relevant for states using that measurement for their law. There is 40', 41', 43', 45' 6". Although 41' is definitely more common, it depends on the state, and also the diagram they use. Diagram 1 is to center of the rear axle, Diagram 2 is center of the rear tandem (center point between the last 2 axles in the event of a 3 or 4 axle trailer). West Virginia being the true oddity (?); 37' with no specified diagram.

Here is a very easy to understand reference list of kingpin law in each state (column on the far right is "Diagram" and refers to the second image shown below):

0751981001561309291.jpg

Here is Diagrams 1 & 2:

0116978001561309222.jpg

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Thank G-Town.

That has got to be the definitive answer on that subject!

So is a 50' tape the right tool?

I guess my concern would be keeping track of when one is headed into or through a more restrictive State or states and how to manage that.

As these settings affect weight distribution (axle weights, etc.) how does one deal with such things? Can't just head back to shipper to rebalance or offload trailer!) Do you set tandems and scale for the most restrictive state one will pass through?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I guess my concern would be keeping track of when one is headed into or through a more restrictive State or states and how to manage that.

As these settings affect weight distribution (axle weights, etc.) how does one deal with such things? Can't just head back to shipper to rebalance or offload trailer!) Do you set tandems and scale for the most restrictive state one will pass through?

I deal with these issues daily. I go from Louisiana up into the Northeastern states regularly. Marc, you're not driving currently and it sounds overwhelming. Most drivers know this stuff instinctively if they deal with it often. It becomes second nature - you just get to know the whole country and the way the rules are applied in the different states.

You make sure you are legal in each of the states you're traveling through before you leave your shipper. Occasionally you can fudge a little on multiple stop loads, but you better be sure you know what you're doing. As a flatbed driver I deal more with open and closed axle issues. Recently I had to have my axles open to be legal with the weight at the rear of my trailer. But the load was going up through Maryland and Connecticut where my axles needed to be closed due to their laws and strict enforcement of them. I had two stops before I got to Maryland. That took enough weight off the back end of my trailer so that I could close them up for the rest of the trip.

It's not as complicated as it sounds. It's just part of the job. Pay attention to the details. Execute your duties as a driver. Be a professional. It's all part of distinguishing yourself out here as a driver who can Run With The Big Dogs

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I guess my concern would be keeping track of when one is headed into or through a more restrictive State or states and how to manage that.

As these settings affect weight distribution (axle weights, etc.) how does one deal with such things? Can't just head back to shipper to rebalance or offload trailer!) Do you set tandems and scale for the most restrictive state one will pass through?

double-quotes-end.png

I deal with these issues daily. I go from Louisiana up into the Northeastern states regularly. Marc, you're not driving currently and it sounds overwhelming. Most drivers know this stuff instinctively if they deal with it often. It becomes second nature - you just get to know the whole country and the way the rules are applied in the different states.

You make sure you are legal in each of the states you're traveling through before you leave your shipper. Occasionally you can fudge a little on multiple stop loads, but you better be sure you know what you're doing. As a flatbed driver I deal more with open and closed axle issues. Recently I had to have my axles open to be legal with the weight at the rear of my trailer. But the load was going up through Maryland and Connecticut where my axles needed to be closed due to their laws and strict enforcement of them. I had two stops before I got to Maryland. That took enough weight off the back end of my trailer so that I could close them up for the rest of the trip.

It's not as complicated as it sounds. It's just part of the job. Pay attention to the details. Execute your duties as a driver. Be a professional. It's all part of distinguishing yourself out here as a driver who can Run With The Big Dogs

smile.gif

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Viking's Comment
member avatar

Thank G-Town.

That has got to be the definitive answer on that subject!

So is a 50' tape the right tool?

I guess my concern would be keeping track of when one is headed into or through a more restrictive State or states and how to manage that.

As these settings affect weight distribution (axle weights, etc.) how does one deal with such things? Can't just head back to shipper to rebalance or offload trailer!) Do you set tandems and scale for the most restrictive state one will pass through?

Since you are measuring from the back of the trailer a 12ft tape will be more then enough. 10ft from the back of the trailer is the 40 ft mark. 9 ft is 41ft and so on.

As for getting your weight legal while also minding kingpin laws.. you absolutely can go back to the shipper and have them rework/order the load or take some weight off depending on your problem. That's why you should always scale at the closest scale to the shipper.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Lol I have big feet for a woman.. 12", so I just heel to toe pace it off from the back of the trailer in the rare event the one I have is not marked.

No atlas? You're kidding hopefully. The motor carriers atlas is your bible and lists all the information you need to do your job. Get one and learn to use it.. they're not expensive.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Thank G-Town.

That has got to be the definitive answer on that subject!

So is a 50' tape the right tool?

I guess my concern would be keeping track of when one is headed into or through a more restrictive State or states and how to manage that.

As these settings affect weight distribution (axle weights, etc.) how does one deal with such things? Can't just head back to shipper to rebalance or offload trailer!) Do you set tandems and scale for the most restrictive state one will pass through?

double-quotes-end.png

Since you are measuring from the back of the trailer a 12ft tape will be more then enough. 10ft from the back of the trailer is the 40 ft mark. 9 ft is 41ft and so on.

As for getting your weight legal while also minding kingpin laws.. you absolutely can go back to the shipper and have them rework/order the load or take some weight off depending on your problem. That's why you should always scale at the closest scale to the shipper.

Thanks.

What I meant was you can't go back to the shipper once you have driven through several states!

(I have a laminated atlas... just haven't been in it in a while)...

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dan67's Comment
member avatar

Shame on you.. You should open it when you plan every trip.

(I have a laminated atlas... just haven't been in it in a while)...

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Shame on you.. You should open it when you plan every trip.

(I have a laminated atlas... just haven't been in it in a while)...

Not currently driving a CMV!

(Pretty confident using Wayze in my Nissan Frontier)...

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Viking's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Thank G-Town.

That has got to be the definitive answer on that subject!

So is a 50' tape the right tool?

I guess my concern would be keeping track of when one is headed into or through a more restrictive State or states and how to manage that.

As these settings affect weight distribution (axle weights, etc.) how does one deal with such things? Can't just head back to shipper to rebalance or offload trailer!) Do you set tandems and scale for the most restrictive state one will pass through?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Since you are measuring from the back of the trailer a 12ft tape will be more then enough. 10ft from the back of the trailer is the 40 ft mark. 9 ft is 41ft and so on.

As for getting your weight legal while also minding kingpin laws.. you absolutely can go back to the shipper and have them rework/order the load or take some weight off depending on your problem. That's why you should always scale at the closest scale to the shipper.

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks.

What I meant was you can't go back to the shipper once you have driven through several states!

(I have a laminated atlas... just haven't been in it in a while)...

Ah in that case yes, you are absolutely correct.

Also I forgot to mention that yes, you do indeed set the tandems for the most restrictive state of your trip as a general rule.

For example, no matter where you start if your going to Cali you should have your tandems at the 40ft mark.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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