Trainer's Behavior

Topic 26057 | Page 2

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Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

Is this trainer on a lease?

Yes. So I figured I'm being used.

Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

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If this is the way your first 50 is going I hate to say it but the next 150 isn't going to be much better.

I would chat with your mentor and explain your concerns and if it doesn't work then have a conversation with your DQ person. It is not unreasonable to request a place with facilities.

More important though is that you get the training. If they are not going over the qc with you, paperwork, and procedures then you are being used for your clock.

Part of the issue out here is too many students don't speak up when mentors are not doing their job.

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The lack of proper training is the issue. I posted this elsewhere and everyone replied that I should get a new trainer. Prolonging training is fine. I want to be trained properly before I go solo. Don't need to damage property or kill anyone.

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Drew considering you are with Swift, please carefully consider Big-T's suggestions. He is a highly competent Swift Mentor, clearly understands the process and what is expected. I absolutely agree with his statements and suggestions. Talk to your mentor, try to work it out before addressing it with the Driver Development Manager (you should have met them when you were initially introduced to your mentor).

Force the communication to occur. It's your training, and unfortunately you need to be your own advocate.

I thought about it last night. Didn't sleep at all. At this point, I won't get the proper training. He just runs me until my time is out, immediately puts me on sleeper. Once that 10 is up. I'm driving right away.

I brought up stuff I need to learn, keeping my own set of training paper logs, like I was told to do in orientation. And his reply was we'll get to it. And I didn't need to do my own set of logs. I got safety points because there was no pretrip done.

Just drive and sleep. That's it. Not learning anything else. If that's all I ever had to do, I'm fine. But, I need to learn the Qualcomm , trip planning, macros, hooking the trailer to the 5th wheel, tandems , etc..

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

Drew, what company are you with?

When I read stuff like this, I realize how great my trainer was at Schneider. And then there's Mr. Turtle, and Rainy, etc. But not every student gets a great trainer. Very sad.

It's not the company. I think they did a great job getting me ready to go out with a trainer. It was an intense few weeks. But it worked for me.

I already knew there are bad trainers out there. But many more great ones. I did my best to voice my concerns. They went unheard with the driver. So, I had to make a decision to not be his mule anymore.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

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Is this trainer on a lease?

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Yes. So I figured I'm being used.

Perhaps. Follow the advice that G-Town handed to you. Be the squeaky wheel! It’s your training so you need to get the best training and trainer possible so you will learn the most.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I thought about it last night. Didn't sleep at all. At this point, I won't get the proper training. He just runs me until my time is out, immediately puts me on sleeper. Once that 10 is up. I'm driving right away.

I brought up stuff I need to learn, keeping my own set of training paper logs, like I was told to do in orientation. And his reply was we'll get to it. And I didn't need to do my own set of logs. I got safety points because there was no pretrip done.

Just drive and sleep. That's it. Not learning anything else. If that's all I ever had to do, I'm fine. But, I need to learn the Qualcomm , trip planning, macros, hooking the trailer to the 5th wheel, tandems , etc..

I'm in agreement with G and others (including my earlier post). Sounds like it's time to pick up the phone.

It's one thing to be treated like "meat in the seat" - and quite another to not get your questions adequately answered, or get trained in the skills required.

But - as you mentioned earlier - there are people still waiting to get a trainer, so you may have to wait to be re-assigned a new one. At this point, the wait might be worth it - versus coming out of your training miles lacking the skills you need to be safe & successful.

Rick

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I thought about it last night. Didn't sleep at all. At this point, I won't get the proper training. He just runs me until my time is out, immediately puts me on sleeper. Once that 10 is up. I'm driving right away.

I brought up stuff I need to learn, keeping my own set of training paper logs, like I was told to do in orientation. And his reply was we'll get to it. And I didn't need to do my own set of logs. I got safety points because there was no pretrip done.

Just drive and sleep. That's it. Not learning anything else. If that's all I ever had to do, I'm fine. But, I need to learn the Qualcomm , trip planning, macros, hooking the trailer to the 5th wheel, tandems , etc..

double-quotes-end.png

I'm in agreement with G and others (including my earlier post). Sounds like it's time to pick up the phone.

It's one thing to be treated like "meat in the seat" - and quite another to not get your questions adequately answered, or get trained in the skills required.

But - as you mentioned earlier - there are people still waiting to get a trainer, so you may have to wait to be re-assigned a new one. At this point, the wait might be worth it - versus coming out of your training miles lacking the skills you need to be safe & successful.

Rick

I whole heartedly agree. Waiting a few days to weeks to receive proper training in my new career/life is well worth it.

I already love driving. I can deal with the truck stops, the life style, odd sleep schedules, stupid/crazy/reckless 4-wheel drivers, etc. Just need to reset to a new trainer. Get it done right and safe.

This website besides a couple othershas helped out quite a bit. Thank you all for your continued advice and input.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Big T's Comment
member avatar

Yes you do need to have logs. At least eight days worth when you go to upgrade. They would love to see logs for the entire training, but as long as you have eight days worth you should be ok.

I would write everything down: your concerns, your attempts to discuss your concerns, and responses, what you actually did, etc. They may make you write a statement and if they do you will be prepared.

It sucks you had to deal with a paycheck mentor but there are other good ones out there.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

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If this is the way your first 50 is going I hate to say it but the next 150 isn't going to be much better.

I would chat with your mentor and explain your concerns and if it doesn't work then have a conversation with your DQ person. It is not unreasonable to request a place with facilities.

More important though is that you get the training. If they are not going over the qc with you, paperwork, and procedures then you are being used for your clock.

Part of the issue out here is too many students don't speak up when mentors are not doing their job.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

The lack of proper training is the issue. I posted this elsewhere and everyone replied that I should get a new trainer. Prolonging training is fine. I want to be trained properly before I go solo. Don't need to damage property or kill anyone.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Drew considering you are with Swift, please carefully consider Big-T's suggestions. He is a highly competent Swift Mentor, clearly understands the process and what is expected. I absolutely agree with his statements and suggestions. Talk to your mentor, try to work it out before addressing it with the Driver Development Manager (you should have met them when you were initially introduced to your mentor).

Force the communication to occur. It's your training, and unfortunately you need to be your own advocate.

double-quotes-end.png

I thought about it last night. Didn't sleep at all. At this point, I won't get the proper training. He just runs me until my time is out, immediately puts me on sleeper. Once that 10 is up. I'm driving right away.

I brought up stuff I need to learn, keeping my own set of training paper logs, like I was told to do in orientation. And his reply was we'll get to it. And I didn't need to do my own set of logs. I got safety points because there was no pretrip done.

Just drive and sleep. That's it. Not learning anything else. If that's all I ever had to do, I'm fine. But, I need to learn the Qualcomm , trip planning, macros, hooking the trailer to the 5th wheel, tandems , etc..

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Big T. I appreciate your advice.

I'm meeting with a Driver Development staff member in the morning. Get everything sorted out.

Funny thing. As soon as I told my former mentor I had a "family emergency", he immediately called someone and asked for another student ASAP. So, obviously, he'll do this again.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Big T. I appreciate your advice.

I'm meeting with a Driver Development staff member in the morning. Get everything sorted out.

Funny thing. As soon as I told my former mentor I had a "family emergency", he immediately called someone and asked for another student ASAP. So, obviously, he'll do this again.

And it's IMPORTANT that you disclose your issues IN DETAIL to Driver Development. Not in a mean or retaliatory way - but in a concise and unemotional way.

If this is the guys common practice - he is doing THE TRAINEE AND THE COMPANY a dis-service, and either he straightens his act out and ACTUALLY TRAINS - or he gets removed as a trainer (which if he is leasing and not making it WITHOUT A TRAINEE - means he is likely not long for the company either).

Rick

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

One thing not mentioned. When you are in the driver's seat it's your butt on the line. Your logs are your responsibility. You should be the only one doing anything with them.

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