Nervous!

Topic 26095 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Cece's Comment
member avatar

Hey again everyone. I finally go to school July 29. I am feeling nervous about if I will get everything down in a timely manner. I just want to absorb everything I can from the instructors and I'm praying I get the hang of driving the trucks. Never even driven a standard. On the plus side I'm feeling excited too. This is something I've been talking about doing for 6 or so months now. Any tips? Wish me luck!

Pete E Pothole's Comment
member avatar

Just listen and learn, be coachable. DO NOT EXPECT TO DO SOMETHING PERFECTLY. Sometimes good enough is good enough, don't add pressure to yourself. There is enough pressure in that seat without you adding more to it.

Good luck, keep your eye on the goal you have set, you will have to go through BS to get there and some of the BS you will endure might just be in school.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

From what I was told, having no experience with a standard is beneficial because you're a clean slate.

When driving backwards the trailer moves opposite the wheel. You turn right the trailer goes left. Small steers go a long way so don't oversteer.

I always stop and talk to myself. Which way do I want the trailer to go? I want it to go left so I'll turn right. When I'm driving I say the gear I'm in out loud. It makes it easier to remember. I also read the signs out loud. During my road test, the exam guy never asked me about signs because I just read them off as I drove. I also wore a hat during my test that way the examiner could tell my head was checking mirrors even though he wasn't looking directly at me.

That's all I have for now. Welcome aboard and ask any questions you may have.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Cecelia, best of luck for you! What school are you going to? Any company lined up yet?

As Pete and Banks hint, this isn't as easy as most people expect. I'll tell you, you will probably become extremely frustrated in the course. I was, until I considered quitting from frustration. (Obviously I didn't) Stick to it, and consider each failure as a learning experience.

Finally, on the road part, you have to get in the frame of mind that your truck is 70 feet long, not 20 feet like a car. Start a training diary in the CDL Training Diaries section so we can watch your progress and cheer you on!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

Good luck to you and keep us posted on your progress. If you're having problems or questions you don't feel your instructors are adequately addressing don't be afraid to ask on here. We got some very smart and experienced veterans on here.

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

Everyone else who will be there with you is just as nervous. Just don't let the nerves overwhelm you and use school to find out what helps you settle them, cause you will need that skill out on the road once you're solo and dealing with crowded truck stops, traffic, bad weather, tight shippers, wrong turns, etc.

For me it helped watching others and identifying (to myself) the mistakes they were making and either realizing oops i do that, or at least i don't do that. Even once out solo.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

I think we all were scared, nervous, whatever word you want to put to it.

I had a little over a years OTR driving experience, and other, when I went to school a year ago. I was still waking on pins and needles though. We all have our reasons I guess. Mine was that it had been 25 years since I'd driven an 18 wheeler. We all have our reasons.

There were a variety of people in our class. Some older and so e younger people. I found it to be comical that the older ones were still scared. I mean, people who have had a life long of experiences but, an 18 wheeler still scared them to death. lol

One of the guys that was going to school had 15 years experience OTR, and he was still nervous about it.

Anyway, we all go through the same process I think. Just go into it with the willingness and desire to learn everything you possibly can. A lot will come over time. It's a process.Youll learn what you need to learn in school to pass your test. And, you'll learn what you need to learn while out with a company trainer to work for that particular company. And, you'll also learn basic road knowledge while out with a trainer.

Anyway, yeh, it's a process. Take it one step at a time and don't get ahead of yourself. Use a simple rule, speak up if you don't understand something. Don't keep your mouth shut if your not getting it. Ask questions if you need to. Be aggressive but, not annoying.

Be yourself. We had one girl that would get in the truck during backing practice and she'd be all over the place. You could watch her turning turning turning the wheel every which way. We'd be talking with her and she'd say, 'I wish I could do it like you guys'. That's one place where she was making a mistake. She needed to learn,and stop trying to back like us. The instructors would get frustrated with her and walk away because, she wouldn't listen to them and do what she was told. She'd keep on turning turning turning that wheel, trying to be something she hadn't become yet.

Yeh, I've heard that too. It's normally easier for someone to learn to drive a stick in an 18 wheeler that doesn't have any experience with a stick shift.

Good luck!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Cece's Comment
member avatar

It's Troops Into Transportation. A school offered for active duty military and veterans but I'll be in Fort Hood Texas. I've been speaking with US Xpress, Prime, and Swift. At the completion of my school they have representatives from Werner, JB Hunt, Schneider and fee others coming to speak with us.

Cecelia, best of luck for you! What school are you going to? Any company lined up yet?

As Pete and Banks hint, this isn't as easy as most people expect. I'll tell you, you will probably become extremely frustrated in the course. I was, until I considered quitting from frustration. (Obviously I didn't) Stick to it, and consider each failure as a learning experience.

Finally, on the road part, you have to get in the frame of mind that your truck is 70 feet long, not 20 feet like a car. Start a training diary in the CDL Training Diaries section so we can watch your progress and cheer you on!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More