Crap Companies

Topic 26187 | Page 2

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Michael B.'s Comment
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Brett is right on about the terminal rats. I spent this weekend at a terminal getting my truck serviced . While there I was talking with a rat. He was talking about being a 3rd generation trucker. He was planning on quitting next month because our company sucks, his dispatcher sucks, the equipment sucks, he is barely getting enough miles to cover the truck payment because his crappy dm....and so forth. He said he is told freight is down so he is only getting 1600 per week. I mentioned that freight wasn't too down as I'm getting plenty of miles (2800-3000 weekly) and still take a 34 every week. He says "you shouldn't be doing that you should be running on Recaps. I mentioned I had been doing some night driving at which point he proceeded to mention "not me, I told my dm I refuse to drive at night" So he only drives 6-7 hours per day, wont drive at night because it messes with his sleep schedule and gets hot on the phone with his dm and wonders why he doesnt get good miles.....hmmmm. These are the types that post the "run down the company" videos on YouTube and the type that fail as truckers and fail as employees. In one ear and out the other when talking to them. Although very entertaining to talk to sadly some people are influenced by them. I find the hardest yet most entertaining part to get is that they dont understand that they themselves are their problem.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Matthew W.'s Comment
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I wouldn't go that far myself PackRat, but I do respect your right to have an opinion. Myself, I learned most of my pre-training knowledge on trailer control and backing maneuver setups off YouTube. In the end this probably hurt me a bit as my trainers just assumed I knew how to back so they never showed me those problem childs that can ruin your day. So my own personal opinion is to steer clear or channels like this one and instead find channels that seek to educate you instead of waste your time filling your head with negativity.

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Matthew you basically confirmed the relevance of PackRat’s suggestion (in bold).

You tube videos are not vetted for truth, accuracy or quality of information. As a total novice how could you tell good from no good.

I agree with PackRat.

Well you can get a good start in that by ignoring vidoes where the uploader does not talk at all. Secondly you find videos where they guide you step by step, this shows interest in actual training. And considering none of my trainers provided even one step, I wonder where I would have got the information from otherwise? Don't get me wrong by playing around with the trailer you gain better perception skills and understanding of how to maneuver the trailer, I would never knock getting a heads up on that process. For instance students could completely ignore this site using that same excuse you gave me. How would a novice know the information on this side is good or just people attempting to look smart? It I sup to the individual to vet the information coming at them for accuracy

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
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I love how you often want to argue with factual information that is posted here by those that actually know something, Matthew.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
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Matthew wrote:

For instance students could completely ignore this site using that same excuse you gave me. How would a novice know the information on this side is good or just people attempting to look smart? It I sup to the individual to vet the information coming at them for accuracy

Excuse? None of those videos are vetted. Anyone can post whatever they want. A novice doesn’t know how to get anything which is why you are being called out by a moderator and an experienced driver.

Do you really want to do this Matthew? Let me know...okay? Cause I love “shredding” BS posts...and yours is one of them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Anyone who takes stock in Mathews counterpoint to PackRat and I, for starters, please read this:

About Trucking Truth

For the record Matthew; I never once watched a YouTube video before going to Swift school. As a result I did not show-up to class with any preconceived notion of how-to handle the truck or back a trailer. Had no issue graduating in 3 weeks or passing the 3 CDL test the first shot.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

You could try.

But I would not accept your Moderator offer for very obvious reasons. I trust and respect the mindshare of this site which you have yet to prove yourself a part of. And unlike you, they trust and respect my integrity, wisdom and experience. That puts you in the minority Matthew.

I just love it when a person many of us have helped on our own time, decides to go “Rogue” because they think after a couple of months they know it all.

Good luck with your website Matthew. Give Truckers Report a run for their money.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Mathew, I deleted your last two comments (G-Town was responding to one of them while I was writing this) because we will not argue pointless garbage with you until the sun comes up.

How would a novice know the information on this site is good or just people attempting to look smart?

People who have been successful in their lives know there is a certain process that applies to succeeding in any complex or difficult endeavor. That's why you'll find very well-read books like, "The 7 Habits Of Highly Successful People" that talk about the traits successful people have in common. When people read our strategies for being successful in trucking they recognize that we understand this process and know how to apply it to our industry.

There are also a lot of common sense principles we share which we back with many facts and examples. For instance, the common theme of "starter companies". If you'll follow our logic it should make sense that the largest, most successful carriers in the nation are fantastic places to work, and in fact are fantastic places to spend an entire career. That the elite companies in this nation are "bad companies" should seem absurd.

Episode 9: Are Major Carriers Nothing More Than Starter Companies?

People will listen to the terminal rats on YouTube, they'll listen to our logic, and decide for themselves which one makes sense. Honestly, we're not interested in convincing everyone that we're right. We're interested in serving the top 10% - 20% of performers out there and helping them become top tier drivers. Those who think the terminal rats are right almost certainly have no chance of getting very far in this industry or in any difficult endeavors they may face.

The amount of life experience and common sense you have will determine which message resonates with you. Choose the one you feel works for you and act on it. Our philosophy is simple; we'll tell you what we know, you do with it what you like.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Seabee-J's Comment
member avatar

Hi Cecelia, I know that channel myself, I don't care much for it really, mostly negative and dissuading info for anyone looking to start out in the field . I'm always on the hunt for a good YouTube channel that is relevant to the the field but his channel is pretty much much a nonstop whinefest about most parts of the job and doesn't really help you find a way to get off to a solid start . Most of these guys are angry about a lot of stuff that really shouldn't matter to you right now so take what they say with a grain of salt . The more I've looked into it and been around this site is that you will get what you put in , No industry is perfect but remember any Yahoo can get a YouTube channel . I've had a solid Navy career so far and have lots of positive things to say but there's a ton of youtubers saying how the military screws you over . I see a lot of parallels with the trucking industry. Anyway good luck to you and keep the shiny side up . Dont let negative people mess you up.

Cecelia 's Comment
member avatar

Thank you so much. I had a terrible experience in the military but I dont go around telling ppl it's horrible. I take all of those YouTube videos with a grain of salt.

Hi Cecelia, I know that channel myself, I don't care much for it really, mostly negative and dissuading info for anyone looking to start out in the field . I'm always on the hunt for a good YouTube channel that is relevant to the the field but his channel is pretty much much a nonstop whinefest about most parts of the job and doesn't really help you find a way to get off to a solid start . Most of these guys are angry about a lot of stuff that really shouldn't matter to you right now so take what they say with a grain of salt . The more I've looked into it and been around this site is that you will get what you put in , No industry is perfect but remember any Yahoo can get a YouTube channel . I've had a solid Navy career so far and have lots of positive things to say but there's a ton of youtubers saying how the military screws you over . I see a lot of parallels with the trucking industry. Anyway good luck to you and keep the shiny side up . Dont let negative people mess you up.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Cecelia 's Comment
member avatar

Thnx G Town ! I haven't seen that article yet, I'll definitely check it out.

Cecelia I guarantee you the genius who recorded those videos never worked for one of this companies...

Internet of Lies & Misinformation

We hear this constantly. Nonsense. I can assure you; good drivers can be wildly successful at every company mentioned.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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