Expired License

Topic 26256 | Page 1

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midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

Sorry for starting another thread so soon, but I went to call around to a few companies today and got some hard news I'm hoping for some input on to figure out what best to do. My regular driver's license expired while I've been overseas, and so far they're saying you have to have it current for at least the past year to be considered, the guy at Prime said maybe even three years since it's been awhile.

My first thought of course is to fly back and get relicensed ASAP to start the clock, despite at the moment being hard-pressed to cover the cost of arranging that. Either way, going to do that ASAP. But I'm wondering how set in stone the one-year requirement would be for many of the (reputable) places with their own CDL school. Originally I was planning on coming back for good around February and hitting the ground running with this.... everything about OTR trucking feels like the perfect match for me. But if I can't make it back to relicense until September, October, and then another year on top of that... ouch.

Don't get me wrong, I understand the reason behind this, in absence of them being able to ascertain my driving skills beforehand. But from what I saw states like Iowa or Wisconsin don't require the previous driving experience to be immediately prior to when you test in order to actually get your CDL... leaving me to wonder how much wiggle room some companies might have, if they feel everything else about you checks out.

Anyone know about anyone who faced a similar issue, and how that worked out for them in the end?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

You are correct.. not every state requires you to have a regular drivers license for at least a year before getting your cdl permit. I don't think Texas requires that either but I'm not certain. I'd be looking at companies with schools in those states first.. it's worth a shot anyway. Prime and associated companies would be a no go I imagine, but crst is based in iowa. Of course they only do teams too. I'd be calling various states dmv offices and asking what they require to test for your permit to get a better list of states requirements.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

You are correct.. not every state requires you to have a regular drivers license for at least a year before getting your cdl permit. I don't think Texas requires that either but I'm not certain. I'd be looking at companies with schools in those states first.. it's worth a shot anyway. Prime and associated companies would be a no go I imagine, but crst is based in iowa. Of course they only do teams too. I'd be calling various states dmv offices and asking what they require to test for your permit to get a better list of states requirements.

Actually as far as testing for the CDL goes it seems I'm good, they each require one or two years previous driving experience, which I have. The problem I'm seeing is most companies are requiring you to have had your regular driver's license for at least the year immediately prior to when you apply to work for them... mine expired because I didn't think I'd need to worry about renewing it, figured I'd just get relicensed whenever I came back, I've been here for a decade.

I'm just wondering if I show up and apply everywhere, flew back to relicense six months beforehand, come with notarized and legally translated statements regarding working within my wife's business and 1099s from an online side business, etc., if for everyone it'd still be a hard pass or not. Probably won't get an answer before I try, it's just hard to try to plan on something so big with so much uncertainty. I know there are "second-chance" companies that work with people with DUIs and everything, and maybe for them it wouldn't be such an issue (will probably 'em call soon), but I'm imagining that would mean taking a big hit on pay, and probably having to pay to go to a CDL school first to get licensed for it. None of which is a deal-breaker if it gets my foot in the door, and in a situation like that I figure trying to switch companies after a few months (and it'd been a year since I was originally relicensed) would make all the difference.

I dunno, just trying to re-strategize so I can still make this happen as soon as possible.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Have you talked with Knight or Swift?

midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

Have you talked with Knight or Swift?

Nope, not those two yet. Thanks, I'll check them out!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Have you talked with Knight or Swift?

double-quotes-end.png

Nope, not those two yet. Thanks, I'll check them out!

That would be a good idea to check them out. I did!rofl-1.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

Swift said it won't be an issue. dancing-banana.gif

double-quotes-end.png

That would be a good idea to check them out. I did!rofl-1.gif

Is there any real difference now between driving for Knight and Swift?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Two different operating companies, same holding company.

I drive for Swift, driving a Swift tractor, Old School drives for Knight driving Knight equipment.

midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

Thanks, I'd read about changes to Swift's service department that'd made it sound more as a merger. I'll call them tomorrow and research into the differences if they go solely on what the state requires as well.

midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

For (Google search) posterity, here's the ones from the list here who don't have an "active in the last x-years regular license requirement", according to the recruiters I spoke to:

Maverick

Swift

Roehl

CR England

Knight probably doesn't either but their system always took me to voice mail in the end.

Stevens, Millis, and Carter all required the regular driver's license to be active for at least one year. Prime said 1 to 3, depending on how long it'd been inactive.

Jim Palmer, Wil-Trans , and Pam required 3 years, according to their profiles on here.

USA Truck Rick Roll'd me. Literally. Not only did that song play on hold, the recruiter said they don't have a CDL school. Neither does Celadon anymore (good guess why). I read after I called Maverick that they sold off their temperature control division. The rest on the list I didn't contact either because it wasn't fit for me personally.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Wil-Trans:

Darrel Wilson bought his first tractor in 1980 at age 20, but, being too young to meet OTR age requirements, he leased the truck out and hired a driver.

Through growth and acquisition, Wil-Trans now employs over 200 drivers, and has a long-standing partnership with Prime, Inc. to haul their refrigerated freight. The family of businesses also includes Jim Palmer Trucking and O & S Trucking.

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