Murphy's Law For Truckers.

Topic 26261 | Page 3

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RealDiehl's Comment
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On a straight, more or less empty 2-lane road, an oncoming car will meet you near the only parked farm tractor on the road, forcing you to slow down so all three vehicles aren't lined up together.

So very true.

And:

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If you don't have any idea about which way to turn, you will turn the wrong way.

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That's me...every GD time! Especially if the truck stop exit is on the other side of where I entered. It is sad but I often have to look at google maps to see which direction I need to turn after exiting a truck stop.

PackRat's Comment
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My favorite that I most always do is pick the wrong line at the fuel island. Unless I pull in at an open spot, I'm going to be behind the guy on break, or the guy getting something to eat, or the guy whose truck is broken down. 80% of the time!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

My favorite that I most always do is pick the wrong line at the fuel island. Unless I pull in at an open spot, I'm going to be behind the guy on break, or the guy getting something to eat, or the guy whose truck is broken down. 80% of the time!

Oh, man! Forgot about that one. You sit there watching a guy who pulled into line 5 minutes after you start pumping his fuel before you do.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I was driving on US-95 two days ago in Murphy, Idaho. Proof on the GPS. Came across this horrendous, single-vehicle crash on the northbound side. This was on a posted 35 mph curve, near the bottom of a 3.5 mile long 6% grade. I don't think he fell asleep, because there are several other jogs in the road before this specific point. I will guess he lost brakes, or went into this turn much too fast. Just a guess. There could have been numerous reasons this happened.

Remember, those posted speed limit signs are for cars and for ideal road conditions. It never pays extra money to ignore safety.

Pics to follow. It's an awful sight.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

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PackRat's Comment
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Dan67's Comment
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On one of the hottest days your a/c will up and quit and leave you in a hot box for days until you can get it fixed. Bring plenty of water.

JCTrucker's Comment
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For students . . . . The ONE maneuver that you are the worst at is the one you will get. AND, expect a full truck pre-trip.

Just sayin . . .

PackRat's Comment
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If you pick up a dropped trailer at the relay location (we'll use Columbus, Ohio for example), count on nothing to go right:

The trailer will be at the drop lot down the street, not the actual terminal address.

The tandems will not have been adjusted to the correct area.

There will be no scale ticket.

There will be two torn mud flaps to replace.

There will be one brake light to replace.

There will only be a single BOL sheet, so you make a copy when you find a copy machine somewhere.

The trailer will be dropped low enough that your rear drives touch the nose of the trailer.

It will be a 45,000 paper load that takes 10 minutes to crank up because your truck does NOT have the airbag dump switch (so we can save the company extra money. So what if you had a heart transplant!).

Good times this morning!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

If you pick up a dropped trailer at the relay location (we'll use Columbus, Ohio for example), count on nothing to go right:

The trailer will be at the drop lot down the street, not the actual terminal address.

The tandems will not have been adjusted to the correct area.

There will be no scale ticket.

There will be two torn mud flaps to replace.

There will be one brake light to replace.

There will only be a single BOL sheet, so you make a copy when you find a copy machine somewhere.

The trailer will be dropped low enough that your rear drives touch the nose of the trailer.

It will be a 45,000 paper load that takes 10 minutes to crank up because your truck does NOT have the airbag dump switch (so we can save the company extra money. So what if you had a heart transplant!).

Good times this morning!

I seem to get the opposite. We fortunately have the air bag dumps and Ive gotten to use it maybe twice while coupling. I seem to always back under beer loads that need to be lowered. Did it yesterday twice and once this morning. I also always pickvthe wrong fuel lane and it also applies to my regular driving. Banks, fast food places with 2 lanes, toll booths, lines inside stores are my biggest enemy ill always manage to stand behind coupon lady at the grocery store or the guy buying $200 worth of lotto tickets. God forbid he buys quick picks, of course you penciled in 200 lotto sheets.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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