So, Am I In A Mess?

Topic 26301 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Christopher M. M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hmm, yes next time I will type on a forum like I am in a interview, thank you.

Christopher M. M.'s Comment
member avatar

How is it that you are having backing accidents with almost a year of experience? And not G.O.A.L.-ing in a tight spot...after two previous accidents. Like OS said, you are NOT learning from your mistakes. You seem careless.

Yes, tiredness does cause carelessness, but I did learn from each new unique mistake. Unfortunately I did not get a chance to show that I learned from the mistakes.

But, to be frank, sometimes stuff just happens and it snowballs and it puts you into the mindset to mess up more.

I do wonder if I made mistakes during my first few months if it would’ve gave me the insight and personal experience to avoid these recent mistakes.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Nevertheless, you have an uphill climb. If you do get lucky and score another job, you better make absolutely sure to not even get a dirty handprint on the truck from here on out. Keep laser-focused at all times.

Did you know that 75% of all truck preventable accidents happen at speeds of less than 5 miles per hour? You do now. Good luck, friend.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Might have helped you a great deal to have been on here, asking questions, or at least reading.

Big Scott posted a couple weeks ago, "How many GOALs is too many? The one you don't do". That's a fact.

Times to be extra cautious and slow down are when you get stressed or are tired or fatigued at the end of a shift. Remember that you are in charge of that rig when you're behind the wheel. Learn when to tell dispatch NO. As long as you have a legitimate reason, situation or concern, there should be no problem if you need a rest.

Learn from your previous mistakes?

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

Again nothing but excuses. Unless you own up to what you have down. Its unlikely you will get hired again. It makes you sound like a dangerous, unsafe driver. You have to stop the excuses.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

not sure how I only got his air line.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

That's pretty amazing. I was wondering the same thing as Bruce, but just left it alone. Your answer tells me there's way more to this story.

I also don't understand how you managed to do so well at CRST, but then once you get hired somewhere else you start having accidents. Do you have any explanation for it?

double-quotes-end.png

I think I backed the corner of the trailer in between the tractor and trailer, pinched the line, so the line acted as a buffer.

Most likely overconfidence, switching to solo, not getting a schedule down right, letting dispatch run me ragged, stress from home(late night drop off and a run back to terminal for a pick up was a contributor for the first incident.)

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
But, to be frank, sometimes stuff just happens and it snowballs and it puts you into the mindset to mess up more.

This right here ^ ^ ^ ^, is all that I need... TOTALLY DISAGREE !!!! It's not like a drunk driver swerved and hit you head-on. Unfortunately that kinda sh** "does just happen" and it is called a NON-PREVENTABLE. Your 3 mishaps were all easily avoided and PREVENTABLE.

You have NOT learned from your mistakes. Your backing accidents didn't just happen. You were careless, and now you seem to be blaming everything and anything but what is obvious to all of us.

Christopher M. M.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, someone has obviously not made any mistakes before. Of course I was careless, but I was asked for the contributing factors, so I laid some out. A simple “careless” isn’t exactly accurate or gets to the root of the problem, what caused the carelessness or what influenced it, some people seem to forget that things aren’t always black and white, and forget they were once new and inexperienced.

I did admit to messing up, and telling me that I am completely careless and shouldn’t be driving is fairly extreme. Everyone has a bad time at things on occasion and acting like you haven’t and giving me the riot act is ludicrous.

This has been enlightening for me of the community, and I shall remember to be perfect on my next job, that is if I’m even hired again as one person has mentioned earlier.

I wish everyone a good day.

Post-script: Constructive criticism is not the same as putting someone down for errors, there needs to be a build up, how to better, hence the constructive part. There is your example

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Be sure to let us know when you get your next driving job, okay?

I can hardly wait.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Christopher no one put you down. Telling you that I don’t think you have learned from your mistakes is the truth. Doubtful anyone on this forum with experience would disagree.

Stuff happens...? You smacking into a trailer doesn’t just happen. What don’t you get?

You are making excuses. All of us have made mistakes, have been exhausted and any number of the things you have expressed.

Be more careful and own your mistakes. If you find that offensive? My condolences.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More