Has Anyone Experienced This:-----?

Topic 26365 | Page 1

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Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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Three times this month they have assigned me a load, they say we know you'll be late. Please send in a Macro 22. So I send in my macro after accepting the load. Get to either the shipper or receiver, and they still have the original date and appointment time. But yesterday was the first time they refused to unload me. They said contact your driver manager and have them email a new scheduled time. Believe me, I know they get busy. So I take my load to the nearest terminal in Georgia, then get another pickup at in Georgia and take it to Alabama. Take it to Walmart DC and drop. Now I'm on my way back to Georgia to pick up another that goes to NC.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

It's called flexibility. Your dispatcher/planner took a gamble ("we know you'll be late"). It seems you didn't get a service failure, so you're good. Then you take the load to the closest terminal , and you are kept rolling. Another driver can get the original load delivered later.

At Swift, the dropped load is "T-called". I don't know what other companies call it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Joseph I.'s Comment
member avatar

I find so far for me, which is not very long, that in times like that my dispatchers sends me knowing I will have better luck getting unloaded than they will dealing with it on the phone. I have had very good luck working with end handlers but most I have been to a couple times and always worked well with them.

I remember in my first week I had a delivery to make in South Dakota and when I pulled in to the lot the driver near me was complaining he had been there for 3 hours already and was only half unloaded and the unloader took his lunch break so he was left sitting. The guy who came to unload me started my load and I helped with a couple things and we visited about the job and he said it was his break but he would get it unloaded first. As far as I know the guy who was complaining may still be sitting there.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I was assigned several loads with delivery times I knew I couldn't make within my HOS limits. My Schneider driver manager instructed me to report "Impossible Dispatch" ,on those loads. But that was rare, the norm was that they assigned me loads that I had ample time to make if I did my trip planning properly.

Plan your work, then work your plan.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pete E Pothole's Comment
member avatar

So far I've only had two loads like that, the first, I got a QC message saying we have to reschedule so drop it at nearby terminal. Message arrived just as I was about to hit the hay so I could start driving at 1 am. Second load I delivered but arrived five hours later than appointment. Customer didnt seem thrilled, as everyone i talked each said "Oh, you're the five am appointment." Appeared to me as though customer service didnt let them know I picked it up 16 hours after it was supposed to be picked up. I let dispatch know as soon as he sent it wasn't possible for me to meet the delivery appt. and he said he knew and that is fine just get there ASAP. The best part of that trip was when one of the dock workers was extra rude with a crappy attitude was walking away from me after our brief interaction. I said I hope you have a great day sir, he literally stopped in his tracks, turned around with a dumbfounded look on his face. Made my day, to see that look, basically felt like telling him to have a great day was letting him know no matter how he may try to treat me poorly you arent gonna alter my mood or approach.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

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