Poor Trainer

Topic 26542 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Rookie in Training 's Comment
member avatar

Hi all hope everyone is doing well. to start out with I have had my class B CDL for a while now and went to a driving school to up grade to a class A so I did just that and got a job with a big carrier I'm not going to disclose the name of the company, So on my first day out with this trainer thats an owner operator I couldn't bring any food with me to have something to eat while on the road for one and while I was driving to the upper midwest we got caught in bad weather on a major interstate with construction and heavy down pouring rain bad wiper blades and very low visibility me as a brand new driver just out of school and just got my class A trying to drive this 80,000 LB truck in bad weather I had all I could do to keep the truck between in my lane and on a 70 mph high way I had to keep the truck at 62 mph but felt unsafe going that fast so I backed it down to 55 mph and was getting yelled at to keep it at 62 mph and around 4.5 hours in to the trip with all of this that was going on and me white knuckling the wheel and getting very tired was just trying to make some small talk to help keep my mind at ease and was yelled at and had a phone thrown in my face and was told that I'm trying to watch a movie so keep it down!! and at that point that was the straw that broke my back and the next day told this trainer I was done I'm going home!!! so all this said it was my first and worst experience that I ever had as an intro in to the trucking industry. is this the normal for trainer to treat a brand new trainee? just trying to find out because if it is then I don't want any part of the trucking industry and will give up my cdl all together!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

That was probably not the best way for your trainer to ease you into your training. And I'm sure I'd be angry if I was in a similar situation. However, despite that, it probably would have been a better idea to either explain to your trainer how you felt, or to have at least spoken to your training adviser to let him/her know what the situation was.

Even though I cant blame you for saying, "screw this" on an emotional level, it probably wasn't a good idea to just up and leave without at least trying to get another trainer.

I'm sure someone here more qualified than me can offer you advice. I just hope you haven't burnt any bridges by making an emotional decision.

And, No. All trainers are not like that.

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

No it is not always like this and honestly it should never be like this. So I am confused, did you already quit and go home? If not then there are things you can do to resolve this. Start by speaking with your fleet manager and the training department at your company. If you just up and quit then that would be a huge mistake on your part. Reach out to someone and see if this can be addressed. Maybe like stated already have a heart to heart conversation with your trainer. While the behavior is no excuse maybe your trainer was having a bad day. Who knows maybe you two can work it out among yourselves and later look back at this and laugh.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I am not like that, but on my first couple days i went down a 7% grade in pouring rain and fog. That is part of the job.

Training is not a good indicator of trucking because once you upgrade YOU are the one in control.

You have a choice, grin and bare it during training which is VERY short in comparison to a long and lucrative career or quit. Most quit. I am not a quitter, so 4 years later i am still here. And my life is wonderful!!!

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Check out my article..

How to Survive Training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rookie in Training 's Comment
member avatar

Hi all I didn’t quit the company I just had my trainer drop me off at a truck stop close to my house, that said I had no idea on how to or what to do to get ahold of anyone at my terminal to get me a new trainer until I got home, so I put a call in and they told me that they were going to pass it along and that it was up to the training coordinator to see if they are going to be able to help me out. So now I’m just sitting here waiting on a phone call to see if they are going to do anything for me or not...

Hi all hope everyone is doing well. to start out with I have had my class B CDL for a while now and went to a driving school to up grade to a class A so I did just that and got a job with a big carrier I'm not going to disclose the name of the company, So on my first day out with this trainer thats an owner operator I couldn't bring any food with me to have something to eat while on the road for one and while I was driving to the upper midwest we got caught in bad weather on a major interstate with construction and heavy down pouring rain bad wiper blades and very low visibility me as a brand new driver just out of school and just got my class A trying to drive this 80,000 LB truck in bad weather I had all I could do to keep the truck between in my lane and on a 70 mph high way I had to keep the truck at 62 mph but felt unsafe going that fast so I backed it down to 55 mph and was getting yelled at to keep it at 62 mph and around 4.5 hours in to the trip with all of this that was going on and me white knuckling the wheel and getting very tired was just trying to make some small talk to help keep my mind at ease and was yelled at and had a phone thrown in my face and was told that I'm trying to watch a movie so keep it down!! and at that point that was the straw that broke my back and the next day told this trainer I was done I'm going home!!! so all this said it was my first and worst experience that I ever had as an intro in to the trucking industry. is this the normal for trainer to treat a brand new trainee? just trying to find out because if it is then I don't want any part of the trucking industry and will give up my cdl all together!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

You see it that you did not quit, but they do not necessarily see it that way. There are procedures to follow for this and my company tells you exactly who to call in orientation.

You basically walked off the job. Had you quit a company by abandonning the truck, it would be tough to overcome.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Kearsey is right: I'm sure that from the office point of view you walked of the job. This is Saturday. Did you get off the trainer's truck Friday? Get ready to make a phone call early Monday morning.

Large companies have a central phone number any driver can call and they will put you in touch with the right place. You might call that number right now and at least get the right phone number you need.

I know that Swift, in their orientation, gives all new drivers a phone number to call if they have any question/ problem. Also about a few weeks in the training office calls the trainee direct as a follow-up.

It can help us understand your situation better if you let on the company you are with.

Don's Comment
member avatar

I could be wrong, but would guess that if you got off the trainer's truck before contacting someone and getting approval to do so, then in the companies view, you quit.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Rookie has the Patience of Job:

I put a call in and they told me that they were going to pass it along and that it was up to the training coordinator to see if they are going to be able to help me out. So now I’m just sitting here waiting on a phone call ...

0119664001568665318.jpg

A quick hint: Whose job is it anyway?

Don't sit by the phone waiting for it to ring. By this afternoon you should have contacted the training department yourself. Let me ask again: Whose job it it anyway? Three guesses, the first two don't count.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More