Dry Van Securement

Topic 26571 | Page 1

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Wilde's Comment
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We haul these fluidends for halliburton quite often. No big deal properly securing them on a flatbed. But the straps that we use in a dry van have a much lower wll than the 5k lb winch straps used on flatbeds. Typically 1400 lbs or so. And I have no idea what the walls those straps attach to are rated at but they sure do feel weak to me when you start ratcheting the straps down. So does dry van require the same wll of securement as a flatbed? I would think so but how does one achieve that in a dry van?? The load in these pics didn't move on me much but it just doesn't seem safe to me. Those things weigh over 3k each. One strap each is just shy of 50% of wll. So I'm guessing they really need two each to be legal but that would mean 26 straps in all! Ideas anyone?

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Wilde's Comment
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Oops forgot pics

0671889001568685609.jpg0930612001568685642.jpg

PackRat's Comment
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Looks like a flatbed load to me.

Try two straps for each, but it won't help much in an evasive move or a panic stop braking situation.

Are those nailed or bolted to the decking?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Wilde's Comment
member avatar

Not nailed. Strapped to pallets. Yeah I feel like it should be flatbed only. We only haul them a few hundred miles so I guess my company decided it's easier than tarping. So dry van must have same securement as flatbed correct? In order to be safe and legal I will just have to use 2 straps each then.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
PackRat's Comment
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Not nailed. Strapped to pallets. Yeah I feel like it should be flatbed only. We only haul them a few hundred miles so I guess my company decided it's easier than tarping. So dry van must have same securement as flatbed correct? In order to be safe and legal I will just have to use 2 straps each then.

FB securement is much different than van. It's an art and a science.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Michael B.'s Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Not nailed. Strapped to pallets. Yeah I feel like it should be flatbed only. We only haul them a few hundred miles so I guess my company decided it's easier than tarping. So dry van must have same securement as flatbed correct? In order to be safe and legal I will just have to use 2 straps each then.

double-quotes-end.png

FB securement is much different than van. It's an art and a science.

Absolutely, I posted some pics not long ago of my dryvan load, nine 4500 pound coils of copper wire. The shipper built a little cradle that they rested in. Not a single strap and they did great.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Wilde's Comment
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I enjoy pulling flatbed. I love the challenge of it and for some reason just enjoy my workday more when doing that. Unfortunately the small company I'm with does mostly dry van so I haven't been able to do it as much as I'd like. I'm hooked to a stepdeck right now though heading to Denver and life is good.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Stepdeck:

A stepdeck , also referred to as "dropdeck", is a type of flatbed trailer that has one built in step to the deck to provide the capabilities of loading higher dimensional freight on the lower deck.

Wilde's Comment
member avatar

So I'm still a little confused on dot rules on securement in a dry van. I mean, is the frame of the van really strong enough to hold that much weight because it's in a cradle?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar
I'm hooked to a stepdeck right now though heading to Denver and life is good.

I'll be rolling to Denver myself in a few, likely only long enough to get unloaded before i boogie to Pueblo.

Stepdeck:

A stepdeck , also referred to as "dropdeck", is a type of flatbed trailer that has one built in step to the deck to provide the capabilities of loading higher dimensional freight on the lower deck.

Joseph I.'s Comment
member avatar

If it were me I like your 1 strap over each and I would add 1 or 2 straps around the back to help keep load from sliding back. Also did you need to put them all in a single row for weight? I would have considered 1 then 2 then 1 coming back from the front with them instead of 1 single row. Everything kind of helps hold everything else in place. And yes it is far different than a flatbed, sometimes easier sometimes a pain because of needing air bags and such. My biggest complaint is we do a lot of drop and hook to trailers already sealed and unless you were to go and have the place reopen and reseal the trailer you do not know how they are secured until you are either stopped for a check or at destination if a live unload. I have learned to open first back door carefully and off to the side when unsure of how load is loaded. And if load is loaded all the way back to the doors then sometimes there are no straps or bars.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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