When Does LTL Shut Down?

Topic 26683 | Page 1

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Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

For the linehaul drivers here......Ultimately it's up to the driver to not run if they dont feel it's safe to do so, but does your LTL company ever have a mandatory shutdown and if so what is the threshold? It seems if it's an ice storm nobody is out, just curious what else causes your terminal to shutdown. Watching these guys pulling doubles getting whipped around the road got me thinking.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

OD has what they call drivers dicrestion which means it is up to the driver if they want to run or not, if you choose not to the don't count it as a absence.

Then they close certain terminals or routes depending on the weather, usually ice being the one with the lowest threshold. As far a snow I think I hear if it was more than 3 inches on your route they will cancel it.

They do close for wind too but I am not sure what speed and would guess it depends on the trailer weight.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I know FedEx does and stopping is at the drivers discretion. There's a number we call to find out if we're running. I have to get more info on the as winter is approaching. Thanks for reminding me.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the info guys. That's good that they will cancel routes if they deem it bad, I know some of those routes are LONG! unfortunately I seen quite a few sets tangled up in the ditch last winter, and seen even more sets going way too fast for conditions.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

I know with Werner, usually they say that if its bad enough for chains, its bad enough to stop. For the most part, they believe that the driver is the captain of the ship, and if they feel unsafe or unsure about driving, stay safe and communicate with the dispatcher regularly. I know with my last FM/DM/Load planner, as long as we let him know what we were doing and gave him a good reason, he was ok with it. He also knew which drivers would "pull his leg" and those who would be straight up with him. There were only 3 times I ever shut down with him due to weather, and it was because it was snowing so hard that there was 1/2 mile or less visibility with traffic going less than 30 on the highway twice, and the third was because it was snowing 4 inches an hour and I pulled off into a TA, called my dispatcher to let him know,, and went inside and heard a few drivers talking about a 10+ vehicle pileup 10 miles up the road in the direction I was going. My boss called me as soon as I sat down, he called me and told me about the accident and that he saw the weather and it was a good call (he checked on us to make sure we all were safe). He also told me about another driver from my company in the same TA parking lot who's kingpin didn't lock, and he lost his trailer going around a corner (and I saw him as I was walking in.) He made sure that I also got a nice layover pay for the day because I was going to lose out on about 400 - 500 miles that week. But I think he was the exception, he always took care of the drivers who took care of him...

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dan67's Comment
member avatar

I know with my company, AmCan, if you don't feel safe just stop and tell us. No freight is worth loss of life or property. Appointment times can always be changed..

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