Trip Planning Practice #02

Topic 27033 | Page 1

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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In keeping with Brett's vision of educating and encouraging, I decided to post one real trip per week as a trip planning exercise.

This is for newbies who need extra practice, or someone just starting CDL school. Trip planning and time management can be difficult but practice makes perfect, so get a jump on it to make rookie life easier and start earning that money faster.

The "empty miles" is what you will drive right now to your pick up. The "loaded miles" are the miles between your pick up and delivery.

Use your atlas to find your best route, and be sure to add extra time for any cities, mountains, fuel stops, 30 min breaks, and your 10 hour breaks. The weight of the load and terrain can burn more fuel, so be sure to stop and fuel! Use Trucker Path or a truck stop guide book to help you select parking and fuel stops. Be sure to plan to park after the customer. Use a weather app to check the radar ahead.

This load is a meat load, so finding a washout (use google) could be another step. If you are flatbed, then add tarp time instead.

Remember: You can only drive 11 hours per day must include a vehicle inspection, must abide by the 14 hour clock. (see the High Road for HOS , or just ask on the thread if you have questions.)

This is a multi stop load.

Pickup: Dakota City, NE Mon By noon

Delivery 1: Newark, NJ Thurs 0400

Delivery 2: Philadelphia, PA Thurs 0900

Delivery 3: Syracuse Friday 1400

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
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My paid work has been busy, so I haven't had a chance to post my trip plan. But I already looked at the overall route and, with hindsight in my favor, have planned to take a more "southern" route to avoid the snow you ran into in Ohio and Pennsylvania.

In thinking about this, I have some questions about negotiating snow.

When you can't avoid a big snow storm, what strategies do you have to negotiate the storm?

Do you shut down early to avoid what would seem to be the inevitable parking nightmare when you reach the point where you are forced to shut down?

Or what other strategies does driver use when negotiating a snow storm?

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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My paid work has been busy, so I haven't had a chance to post my trip plan. But I already looked at the overall route and, with hindsight in my favor, have planned to take a more "southern" route to avoid the snow you ran into in Ohio and Pennsylvania.

In thinking about this, I have some questions about negotiating snow.

When you can't avoid a big snow storm, what strategies do you have to negotiate the storm?

Do you shut down early to avoid what would seem to be the inevitable parking nightmare when you reach the point where you are forced to shut down?

Or what other strategies does driver use when negotiating a snow storm?

Pay for parking with rewards points ;)

Parking early or before certain points... example.. Elk Mountain in WY. It's 100 miles from Laramie to Rawlins where the large truck stops are. If i don't have at least 4 hours on my clock to get over Elk Mtn, i park it.

i dont drive mountains at night in winter. most of the time. i have done it, when heavy loaded.

midnight fox's Comment
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This load is a meat load, so finding a washout (use google) could be another step.

How does that usually go, do they tend to be nearby? Open 24 hours?

Rob T.'s Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

This load is a meat load, so finding a washout (use google) could be another step.

double-quotes-end.png

How does that usually go, do they tend to be nearby? Open 24 hours?

To add to that does your paperwork tell you if they have washout on site? We do drop and hooks probably twice a day in Dakota City(Tyson) and they wash out our trailers on site before loading so we don't deal with needing that for this particular place. Not sure if that would play a role in your trip planning

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

midnight fox's Comment
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Still curious about the washout aspect to reefer... I've seen people talk about the waits involved with getting unloaded, etc. etc., but never saw much indication of how much of a time suck washouts are, if it's more of a hassle if you're running nights, etc.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Kearsey,

I will post my spreadsheet tomorrow, but as I mentioned above, I took a southern route staying the first night in Bloomington, IL. 484 miles for that day. I also have options for overnight around Davenport, IA. Considering the snow you ran into, I expect to maybe need overnight options from 300 to 484 miles.

Next day, Tuesday, I've planned 483 miles staying the night in Wheeling, VA. I plan to avoid as many overnights in the east, as I expect overnight parking will be difficult.

Next day, Wednesday, I plan to make it to Newark NJ and still have enough time to make it to make it to Molly Pitcher for overnight.

Next day, Thursday, I can deliver to Philadelphia, early morning and make it to Syracuse, NY in the same day.

And trying to be like my hero Turtle, there is a go-kart track at the Flying J off exit 123 east of Indianapolis. So for my 30 minute break that day, I can go drive go karts.

smile.gif

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

There is a Big Dog Tire and Trailer Washout in Syracuse.

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