I Had A Backing Incident Today.

Topic 27043 | Page 1

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Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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I was trying to back (uphill in ice), no traction, no power. Well anyway I slid on the ice and right corner put a 14 inch gash in the parked trailer next to the spot I was going into. So I told the shipper and did some paperwork. This place was not meant for sleeper trucks. Day cabs have trouble getting in there. So sent all pics and info to claims and they said they would get back to me. After this happened the shipper sent someone out with rocksalt to Salt the dock driveway. And the city sent someone out to dust the street. Not saying it was all the ice's fault, because I was the one in the driver's seat. The tractor on the other side was a day cab , and his fender mirrors were sticking out so far I almost hit them as well. Has not been a good week.

Raptor

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Uphill docks when its icy are so risky. They can be a PITA when conditions are good even. Thank you for sharing this. Hopefully it wasn't a reefer trailer simply because they're more expensive to repair, but sometimes stuff happens when we certainly didn't intend for it.

It shows your integrity to go inform the shipper of your incident.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

Don't know if any of you have ever delivered here. I think the name was Denver frozen foods in Denver Pennsylvania. Same kind of a setup. Not meant for a sleeper cab to deliver. It was my first six months driving and it was snowing. Must have taken me a half hour to get in the door. Couldn't see the lines to line up. One of my first of many nightmares.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
It shows your integrity to go inform the shipper of your incident.

couldn't agree more! Raptor even though it took time doing paperwork and possibly talking to safety you demonstrated that you're a professional and take responsibility for your actions. I'd like to think that most drivers admit their mistakes but with some of what I've seen and the current situation I'm going through (which brett kindly took down but will have a very detailed post in the future when it's settled, likely january or february) I know that isnt the case. By reporting it yourself you demonstrated you're exactly the kind of driver that takes pride in their job. I've seen a couple trailers get scraped and the first thing the driver does it get out to look to see if theres any cameras or witnesses. It's much better to get it resolved now then be fired in the future when they find out for failure to report an accident to your employer or even worse be charged with Hit And Run which holds a 1 year CDL suspension even if its minor damage. The best thing you can do is learn from this mistake. Theres nothing you can do now but learn from it. Dwelling on it is only likely to cause a more significant accident in the near future.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Well thanks for the support all. I know I did wrong when the trailer slid to the right on that ice. After it happened they came out with ricksalt for the dock area and the city brought out the sand and salt combo for the road. I have been scheduled for close quarter class at one of our terminals. I just need to get it scheduled. I'm going to try to get it done in PA since I'm going to be unloading a Nestle load there.

I have no problem admitting my mistakes, no one else made them but me. Plus telling it on TT, could help someone else out.

Raptor

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

We forgive you, because you'll learn from your mistakes.

smile.gif

Don's Comment
member avatar

Isn't it frustrating when shippers/consignees won't plow or salt their docks or lots?! Even our company lot is a mess in the Winter with tractors needing pulled out because our drives are spinning on ice after hooking to trailers.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

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