What Status Should We Use In Stopped Traffic?

Topic 27236 | Page 2

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Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for the explanations. Like I said my logical thinking must be throwing me off.

My mind says... If I’m off duty, sitting still in a lot for hrs, I’m not working, therefore that time should be subtracted from the 14 and not held against my clock.

wtf.gif

I understand these rules are in place for safety but it seems like they are too general too take unseen problems into account. Plus everyone has there own sleep needs, for instance, I only need 6 straight hrs of sleep and then I’m ready for another 10-12 hr day of physical labor.

I’ll take Old Schools advice and keep reading it until it clicks

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Other things that gets me is 34 reset rules. If I get home at 6am on Saturday. Sleep 6-7 hrs then go back to bed Sat night and sleep till dawn Sunday, that only gets you credit for one night sleep. Why does it have to be 1am-5am twice?

Why dont you get credit for Saturday morning sleep and still have to wait until 5am Monday to get rolling again?

Makes no sense to me. You get 2 periods of ample sleep in the 34 but 1 isn’t recognized.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Try this for "clicking" in your head:

You have three clocks (or stopwatches) ruling your trucking day plus one for the week. As I mentioned, if things seem a bit crazy, just book mark this topic and come back as you learn your HOS rules.

CLOCK 70: 70 Hours: Maximum deriving and On Duty time in a week plus "today" or eight days till right now. The term "recap" is the time that comes back at midnight after eight days. You can never officially work more than 70 hours in eight days, If you work/drive 8 3/4 hours daily you never need to take time off because of your overtime. Generally you don't need to think about this one on a daily basis.

Inside the CLOCK 70 is a daily
CLOCK 14: 14 hours in a day. Generally, once you start working after a 10 or more hour break, you have 14 hours you can drive in before you must stop. (How to figure: look at your watch. It says 7:00 am. Add 2+7 it's 9. You can work till 9pm. Because 14 is 12 hours plus 2 more.)

Inside each CLOCK 14 is
CLOCK 11: You can drive up to 11 hours in that 14 hour day. You may stop for any reason, as many stops as you need, but you are done driving after 11 hours behind the wheel. Also, you need to take a 30 minute break (start to finish in one go 30 minutes) before 8 driving hours is up, then you can finish out your 11 hours total. This one you can't figure like the 14 hours since your driving time is broken into bits. (Pro Tip: Don't take a 30 minute rest break before your first 3 hours are up, because you will have more than 8 hours to go and you'll have to take another 30 to get them all.)

After CLOCK 14 is done, you use
Clock 10: The 10 hour rest break. This one you figure like the 14 hour one: It's 5pm and you're stopping. Take off 2 hours (12-2=10) and you cans start your pre-trip at 3am or later. Until you get a good understanding of the split sleeper thing hold off on the fancy stuff so you know how long you can work. (Ask Kearsey she's made several posts here explaining it for everybody.)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

#4 hour breaks:

Yes, that two 1-5am thing is in the rules, but it is officially NOT ENFORCED. So you have 34 anytime hours to kick back in. Think one day plus 10 and that's the minimum break. You can take off longer as needed.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Uhhh.. That "hashtag 3" is a "capital 3" on my keyboard? It's supposed to be 34 hours!

embarrassed.gif

Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Thank you again Errol. I do understand the basic time windows and how they work. They perfect sense if you clocked in the same time everyday, but thats not the case. I guess whats really throwing me off other then delays is a scenario like cutting today short to get the 10 in so I can restart the 14 and make an early am delivery tomorrow but in doing so, that throws tomorrow all outta whack. Then if theres delays with next run and I run outta time. Could cause my next load to be late making me look bad ETC..

I am probably just too far ahead of myself and overthinking it. I’m confident I will do well with all the other areas ( pretrip, driving, backing, ETC..) its just the time management part causing concern because theres so many problems beyond your control that can screw everything up and not much play in the 14 hr clock to work with

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Delco goes to the head of the class:

I am probably just too far ahead of myself and overthinking it. I’m confident I will do well with all the other areas ( pretrip, driving, backing, ETC..) its just the time management part causing concern because theres so many problems beyond your control that can screw everything up and not much play in the 14 hr clock to work with

You had just described time management then you realized you were running your brain too fast for a noob. Yes, OTR means you will have several factors to juggle to get in your miles and make those bonuses. Relax and just learn as you go along. Just like 7th 8th and 9th grades in school, each step is more complicated than the last.

And then it will all easily fit in your day.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

#4 hour breaks:

Yes, that two 1-5am thing is in the rules, but it is officially NOT ENFORCED. So you have 34 anytime hours to kick back in. Think one day plus 10 and that's the minimum break. You can take off longer as needed.

I may be wrong, but I think they removed it completely recently. In any case, Errol is of course correct, it is not enforced.

Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Good know that silly 1am-5am rule doesn’t need to be worried about

Thank you again. I feel much better about HOS now. Being a small landscape Co owner, I’m always looking/planning ahead, weather, township debris pickups, priority customers, ETC... Brain got way too far ahead there

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Effective September 2019, FMCSA formally removed the 1am to 5am rule:

FMCSA Removed 1am to 5 am rule

CFR 395.3

I recall that Brett said he was planning to edit the HOS section of the High Road Training Program.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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