What Status Should We Use In Stopped Traffic?

Topic 27236 | Page 1

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Donna M.'s Comment
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Hey I got questions tonight. Last week on I-20 Texas got stopped in traffic for over an hour. Dead stopped what status should we be using?

Matt M.'s Comment
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Technically, on duty.

If it is dead stopped, I turn off the truck and go in the sleeper berth , and log it as sleeper. Keep the curtains open so you can see when it starts moving again.

If you want to be a legal eagle, log on duty and if you run out of hours you are okay to drive to the nearest location to shut down for your break, just be sure to notate on your logs why.

Same thing if you are broke down on the side of the road.

"On duty time means all time from the time a driver begins to work or is required to be in readiness to work until the time the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work. On duty time shall include: (1) All time at a plant, terminal , facility, or other property of a motor carrier or shipper , or on any public property, waiting to be dispatched, unless the driver has been relieved from duty by the motor carrier; (2) All time inspecting, servicing, or conditioning any commercial motor vehicle at any time; (3) All driving time as defined in the term driving time; (4) All time, other than driving time, in or upon any commercial motor vehicle except time spent resting in a sleeper berth; (5) All time loading or unloading a commercial motor vehicle, supervising, or assisting in the loading or unloading, attending a commercial motor vehicle being loaded or unloaded, remaining in readiness to operate the commercial motor vehicle, or in giving or receiving receipts for shipments loaded or unloaded; (6) All time repairing, obtaining assistance, or remaining in attendance upon a disabled commercial motor vehicle; (7) All time spent providing a breath sample or urine specimen, including travel time to and from the collection site, in order to comply with the random, reasonable suspicion, post-accident, or follow-up testing required by part 382 of this subchapter when directed by a motor carrier; (8) Performing any other work in the capacity, employ, or service of a motor carrier; and (9) Performing any compensated work for a person who is not a motor carrier.'

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Commercial Motor Vehicle:

A commercial motor vehicle is any vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers or property with either:

  • A gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • A gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more which includes a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds
Errol V.'s Comment
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Matt is correct: if you are with the truck and supposed to be waiting on loading/ unloading, you need to be in On Duty Not Driving.

But as Matt hints, drivers spend a lot of time in Sleeper (not on the Off Duty line!). I have a friend who will go to sleeper any time he has to wait for something, like live loading, stuck in traffic without moving, even waiting for tire changes or other repairs. He'd rather mark the time as Sleeper than eat up all his duty time and mess up his whole 70 hour cycle.

Delco Dave's Comment
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So if you get to your stop and they say we cant get you in for at least 3 hrs you can go into the sleeper until they are ready to save the hrs?

Also, if this was to happen say 3 times in a day, but one sleeper was 4 hrs, others were 3 each, would the 3 separate sleeper breaks count as your mandatory 10 hr for the day resetting your 14hrs?

Errol V.'s Comment
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So if you get to your stop and they say we cant get you in for at least 3 hrs you can go into the sleeper until they are ready to save the hrs?

I feel that if you must wait to get to a dock, that is your time, so switch to sleeper. I made up this rule for myself: if you can leave your truck and go to a movie (in other words you have no responsibility to wait for further instructions from anyone), that's Sleeper Time.

Also, if this was to happen say 3 times in a day, but one sleeper was 4 hrs, others were 3 each, would the 3 separate sleeper breaks count as your mandatory 10 hr for the day resetting your 14hrs?

Remember, the time for your breaks, outside of the "split sleeper rule"* must not be broken up. In the Hours Of Service, you can take as many breaks as you want, as long as you get one at least 30 straight minutes break before 8 hours of driving are done, and 10 (or split 8+2*) to reset your 14 hours day.

*This is a different rabbit hole, and the FMCSA may modify this soon.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Delco Dave's Comment
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Thanks Errol. I have only read through the HOS section on the High Road once so far and some of it didnt click for me 1st time.

Am I thinking this right? going into sleeper is limited to 2 times per 14(8-2 minimum or longer periods if you choose) only buying you minimal extra time per day but over the coarse of a week if used properly you could open up a full day or 2 by not hitting the 70 of on duty time Resulting in more miles?

Also, is there HOS classes during training? I think I would better understand it if it were taught rather then me just reading it.

I think My logical mindset and lifetime of working by the hour is getting in my way on this system.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
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Am I thinking this right? going into sleeper is limited to 2 times per 14(8-2 minimum or longer periods if you choose)

You can go into the sleeper as often as you like. I typically go into the sleeper four or five times during my working shift. Yesterday I went in the sleeper at three different stops while waiting on the customer to get to me, and I stopped another time for a 45 minute nap. I'm old. I like naps!

Dave, you're gonna figure out the HOS rules while you're working with them. You'll have to if you want to make some money at this. Knowing how to manage your clock is critical to success at this. Go through that High Road section repeatedly. Take the quizzes. I must have done it four or five times before the light bulb went off. All of a sudden one day I realized, "This is going to help me tremendously when I get on the road." I had the distinct pleasure of teaching my trainer how to use the split sleeper rule for his advantage. He had over a decade of experience and didn't even understand how to do an 8/2 split.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

The HOS rules are funny: reading them on paper (or a screen), they might seem to be a crazy mish-mash. But once you start living them on a truck, your understanding comes out.

To answer your question about minimums and maximums, think of the two kinds of time: yours (breaks) and the company's (driving and duty time). You have minimums of "your" time each day - take all you want/need as often as you want. But the company time has maximums - no more than 8 hours driving without a break, you must end your day after 14 hours before you can drive again*.

Oh, yes! You'll have classes in HOS, or Log class. They say something like this:

You can drive a maximum of eight hours per day. But if you take a minimum 30 minute break you can drive a maximum of 11 hours, then you must take 10 hours Off Duty or Sleeper.

I read this explanation and thought, "Huh? 8 or 11 hours? I don't get it." But when you work with that system every day it gets easier. Then when someone says "I took a 10 in Texarkana and my 30 in Joplin, then got to Kansas City with plenty of time to deliver my trailer," you'll know what they're talking about.

*You could be On Duty Not Driving for more time, but you can't drive again without 10 hours off.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Also, if this was to happen say 3 times in a day, but one sleeper was 4 hrs, others were 3 each, would the 3 separate sleeper breaks count as your mandatory 10 hr for the day resetting your 14hrs?

Man...I wish that's how it worked! As others stated though, the only way you can split the ten is with an 8 and a 2 (or a 2 and an 8).

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

A couple months back I had a level 1 inspection at a Tennessee weigh station. The Trooper looked at my Qualcomm then asked me to send my history to him. While sending my logs I was asked about what I do and my status when I'm at a shipper or reciever for extended times waiting for loading/unloading. Looking back I feel it was a trick question to see if I was complying to regs or not. I told him it depends on what I'm doing. If I'm in the front seat or the building im in on duty status but if I have no responsibilities except to wait I usually go to sleeper/restbreak status, go into the sleeper area and watch tv, make something to eat or nap until they finish. Must have been the right answer.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
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