Seeking Solo Otr

Topic 27366 | Page 4

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Jeremy's Comment
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Well seems ya got everything figured out and under control now best of luck to you driver

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Well, this visitor's time with us was short but you guys gave our community a ton of fantastic information. Great job, as always. You guys are awesome. Not only will your information helps tons of people get their careers off to a great start but our friend "Concept" has demonstrated exactly why they say attitude is everything and why so many people fail in their attempt at this career.

On with our mission!

smile.gif

Brett Aquila's Comment
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How can I possibly make “awesome money” with a pay of 29cpm?

This question really shows that people don't listen when they think they know it all and their mouths are always yappin. Old School had already answered his question:

I started at 27 CPM. I busted my tail at that rate for two reasons.

1) I was grateful to have the job.

2) I understood that I had no intrinsic value. I was determined to build my value.

Would fifty thousand dollars be an acceptable year's pay for you? That's what I earned that rookie year.

All you can do is give someone the answers. If they're not willing to listen it won't do them any good.

confused.gifsmile.gif

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Okay, but the popcorn and taco emotes???

Well, this visitor's time with us was short but you guys gave our community a ton of fantastic information. Great job, as always. You guys are awesome. Not only will your information helps tons of people get their careers off to a great start but our friend "Concept" has demonstrated exactly why they say attitude is everything and why so many people fail in their attempt at this career.

On with our mission!

smile.gif

Delco Dave's Comment
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In my opinion, $800 a week as an inexperienced employee learning a new trade is pretty good! I know you cant make that kind of dough as a rookie in the labor trades

Jeremy's Comment
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I guess i was fortunate starting northeast regional but my cpm wasnt spectacular i just brought a very strong work ethic and learned how to make the absolute most of my schedule which is very involved and i should post how i accomplished what i did although i admit i had moments ar around 6 months in when i became top producer in a company of about 70 and i let it kinda get to my head Needless to say i was properly put in my place here at tt and like a know it all i went away mad for a few months but the words spoken to me stuck with me and i came back humbled and i believe now 3 yrs later ive grown to be what i consider to be a complete trucker and i attribute alot of that too tt even if i didnt like everything i heard it almost always went that way. I guess my point is i was kinda where this guy was once and i wish people like myself then or him now would just swallow pride and listen cause without the experience one real screw up is most likely the end of a potentially life changing carreer. Sorry for babbling im not well spoken but im sure yall catch my drift

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
i was kinda where this guy was once and i wish people like myself then or him now would just swallow pride and listen cause without the experience one real screw up is most likely the end of a potentially life changing carreer. Sorry for babbling im not well spoken but im sure yall catch my drift

Jeremy, we certainly understand what you're saying. One of the most frustrating things for me, when laboring to help people understand how to succeed at trucking, is trying to help them have the proper mindset. Almost everytime I have a discussion like this one, I end up berating myself for not doing a better job at it. I know how to break through all the misinformation and unrealistic expectations. I've done it.

Being able to successfully articulate the path through this mysterious maze has proven to be challenging. It's clear to me, but when trying to explain it to someone, we end up dealing with their own ideas which have probably been cemented and confirmed by their association with other drivers.

It's pretty revealing when he refers to me as a "stupid tool." He's never had interactions with another driver who said the things we teach here. It's no surprise he comes to this conclusion...

You are an idiot. You probably aren’t even a driver.

I'm quite sure I sound like an idiot to him. Ninety nine percent of drivers would wholeheartedly agree with his lofty ideas that he's not being compensated fairly. He's never encountered anyone who challenges him to focus on building his credibility and his value by laying down a proper track record. He's convinced he's arrived, therefore everyone else should agree. He's not aware of how much more effective he can be at improving his results.

He's trying to place a value on his time, which is a classic rookie mistake. Value in trucking, is placed on productivity. The guys who get the most accomplished each week are the most valuable. Productivity doesn't have strict limitations like time does. Two people may both work 70 hours while one of them gets much more accomplished during that time. Which one is more valuable? Hence we refer to this as a performance based business.

I wish I were better at expressing these concepts. I work hard at it, but it often falls flat. I know it helps some people who come along later and encounter these conversations. I keep banging away.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Well im pretty sure some of my wake up words came directly from you Most of us are type A so its tough to be called out even if its in their best interest Def dont stop what you are doing even if we dont “get it” at the time if your serious about your job those words stick with you im proof of that

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Old School, I think you do a great job expressing the concepts through a written format. Unfortunately, some people are so hard headed no one can get through to them. I appreciate all your posts and articles, especially the ones regarding productivity. Maybe being a small business owner makes these concepts clear to me. I understand what your saying 100%. I’m sure my work ethic and drive to be the best I can be would have led me in the right direction, but you have laid out an outline for success so all new drivers can start working towards the top tier from day one.

Thank you for being here for us and sharing your keys to success

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Delco, I'm convinced that former small business operators do well in trucking. They are accustomed to "making things work." They have already been working long hours. They are usually focused on getting the job done, and are willing to do what it takes to complete the mission. They have the drive to face the seemingly impossible and consider it just another day.

Most importantly they comprehend producing something. Did anybody notice how our friend "Concept" was constantly speaking of being on the take? His biggest concern was how much he could get, and it was never enough. A small business operator's biggest passion is getting the job done. He wants to produce a product or service that satisfies his customer's needs. He understands that he gets paid for producing something of value. It's not his time he is selling, it's his ability to produce under pressure. It's the same way in trucking. That mentality is a game changer for a truck driver.

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