Check Stations And Ports Of Entry

Topic 27551 | Page 1

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Luffy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey experienced truck drivers, thanks for taking the time to read this and hopefully answering it. I'm a new truck driver, currently in training at prime and so far I think I have figured out how weight stations work but I'm a bit clueless about check stations and ports of entry. I was hoping someone could explain to me if those two are the same thing or different, where u typically encounter them, and how u know as a truck driver if ur supposed to enter them or not? If u are supposed to enter, what do they usually check?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Ports-of-entry and weigh stations are the same thing, as far as we’re concerned; you may get the ‘bypass’ in-cab signal approaching a port-of-entry same as you would a weigh station. Same rules apply: if you don’t get the ‘bypass’ signal and they’re open, you pull in.

The CMV check stations are like weigh stations, minus the advance Prepass signals. If they’re open, you pull in. They will weigh you, and possibly inspect you.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Port of Entry is in Wyoming and Utah. In WY, if it's open and you don't get the PrePass go signal, you go in, park and bring in your registration book. They will ask what you are hauling. Sometimes they will flag you to weigh, many times not.

In UT, it's a weigh station like other weigh stations. You pull around if they flag you.

Other States may have Ports of Entry, but I don't run east past Illinois, west TN, Arkansas, TX anymore.

If you are driving for a company that doesn't have PrePass, you pull in ALL open weigh stations and Ports.

Laura

Luffy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank u very much both of u for the helpful info

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

Also be aware of agricultural check stations. You'll find those in FL and CA. They'll funnel all trucks up a window where an officer will, in my experience, either A: Ask to see your bills, B: Verbally ask what your hauling, C: Just wave you on.

Just have your bills in easy reach and know what your hauling so your prepared to respond.

If your within 100 miles of the southern border you may run into a border patrol checkpoint. They'll ask if everyone in the vehicle is a US citizen. Often they'll run a dog around the truck to sniff. I've never been asked to pull in for inspection, but it's a possibility.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Also be aware of agricultural check stations. You'll find those in FL and CA. They'll funnel all trucks up a window where an officer will, in my experience, either A: Ask to see your bills, B: Verbally ask what your hauling, C: Just wave you on.

Just have your bills in easy reach and know what your hauling so your prepared to respond.

If your within 100 miles of the southern border you may run into a border patrol checkpoint. They'll ask if everyone in the vehicle is a US citizen. Often they'll run a dog around the truck to sniff. I've never been asked to pull in for inspection, but it's a possibility.

Hey Plan B... how ya been?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PlanB's Comment
member avatar

Hey Plan B... how ya been?

Been doing well. Been playing in snow a lot lately. Next load will be my get home load, trying to get home for Valentine's day.smile.gif Also trying to get back in time to take my girls to a local "Daddy & Daughter" dance.

My wife and kids have been leaning on me pretty hard to give up otr and go local. Weighing my options with that one still.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Also be aware of agricultural check stations. You'll find those in FL and CA. They'll funnel all trucks up a window where an officer will, in my experience, either A: Ask to see your bills, B: Verbally ask what your hauling, C: Just wave you on.

Just have your bills in easy reach and know what your hauling so your prepared to respond.

If your within 100 miles of the southern border you may run into a border patrol checkpoint. They'll ask if everyone in the vehicle is a US citizen. Often they'll run a dog around the truck to sniff. I've never been asked to pull in for inspection, but it's a possibility.

My last trip I to Florida I pulled into the agriculture check station. I pulled up to the window and the guy asked what I had to declare, I reached over into my cooler and pulled out the cup of grapes and the cup of sliced cantaloupe I had bought at a loves earlier. He laughed a little and waved me on.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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