More Miles If I Stay Out Longer?

Topic 28090 | Page 1

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Jakester's Comment
member avatar

Question for all you drivers, I’ve been out since I got my truck solo, about 4 months I think, pretty tired at the moment but I assume hat long, I’m all of a sudden getting these long runs, Seattle to Miami, Miami to to LA, I keep in touch with a few of my buddies from school and here not getting many miles, they request home time every 2 weeks or so and i guess my question is does dispatch really send he miles based on if you want to go see your family, it’s not an issue for me at this moment and I’d rather just run, they on the other hand are getting a bad attitude and I really want to tell them they need to stay out longer, I know what they are gonna say, we were told 2-3 weeks out, if you stay out I’m beginning to think that they give you more?

40 Days's Comment
member avatar

I stay out two months at a time first 2 weeks back average miles like 2500 a week. After that its on to like 3500 or slightly more coast to coast 11 hours a day 6 days a week. Staying out helps because dispatch isn't worried about getting you home. At Iowa 80 now if anyone else here.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Jakester, honestly I don't think you can make that connection between staying out for months and getting great miles or long loads. Drivers create a relationship of trust with their dispatcher. That's accomplished by getting things done efficiently, safely, and without causing issues. I don't stay out for months at a time. I turn great miles and get great loads. Your buddies could do the same.

It's great that you're doing what you are, but it's not what's giving you success. You mentioned their attitudes. If that vibe is finding it's way to their dispatcher then that may very well be their biggest issue. It sounds like you're doing a great job. That's what establishes you and puts you in a position of being leaned on and trusted. They will trust you just as much if you decide you want to go home once a month.

When you are productive you will be trusted and given more responsibility. Productivity is the key. Being a slave to the road will cause lesser men than you to burn out. Don't fool yourself into thinking that's why you're getting great miles. You're getting those great loads because you are taking care of your business, and you are easy to work with. That's the golden formula.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
40 Days's Comment
member avatar

Maybe I'm a rookie but that's the connection I made too. First week out a couple 500 to 1000 mile runs. By week 3 and 4 it's 2000 to 3000 mile runs. Its literally the difference between dealing with 5 shippers and 5 receivers and maybe 2.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Spartan 's Comment
member avatar

From my experience, and I’ve been on both sides (dispatch/operations and driving side), it all depends on attitude and your drive/willingness. I’ve seen drivers and had drivers that would always have something come up and need to be home as soon as they were out. On the other hand, I’ve seen drivers and had drivers that were go getters or would knock out their weeks and stay steady. Just like Old School stated...you are out there taking care of business and making ops run smoother. As long as your getting tasks completed safely, efficiently and on time (no fault of your own), along with communicating, then you have nothing to worry about. Keep up the good work and don’t burn yourself out. Make sure you make time for you.

40 Days's Comment
member avatar

I am not saying doing what Old School says will not get you to the top with great miles. It will. I am saying staying out longer will get great runs. There is a difference. If someone lives on east coast and wants to be home in two weeks you don't get sent California. That's a pipe dream. It can be done there and back. After you get there is there a load going home? No guarantee. Availability is a factor and a big one. Drivers how many people that go home bi weekly get 2500 mile single runs that are not on a dedicated account?

Jakester's Comment
member avatar

Spartan so help me understand, what if I stay out to long? I got nowhere to go man, I sleep eat well and drive, I was terrified at this job day one solo, now I don’t check satellite photos of where I have to back into, I check the incoming, but I hope it’s hard, funny my trainer who is a great old time trucker told me, your a long haul driver, you won’t back up much, avoid truck stops other than fuel and a shower, I live by that, but with this virus thing my drop and hook terminal to terminal has found me backing up 3 or 4 times a day, and man I’m learning, doesn’t scare me anymore, I do what my guys and girls at dispatch ask me to do, key word, ask me, i would do anything for this company for what hey have done for me, ya I’m getting tired and may just find a place to chill for a few days, but for now, food needs to be delivered and I’m more than happy to be in the situation the do just that, take care.... I’ve said it before, I wouldn’t change this job for the world!!!!!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Jakester's Comment
member avatar

Hey man honestly I have heard all about this communication and relationship with dispatch, I have had none, zero, that’s why I was asking those questions, I’ve been out so damn long, when I upgraded no one introduced me to anyone in dispatch or any driver manager or anything for that matter, I just got a call met and old guy,(very nice guy) but he didn’t know much, here are your keys, get a mattress and wait, didn’t wait long, dispatched and no clue what to do, I liked that after the initial aggravation wore off, but to get back to getting there trust and all that, I don’t think they I exists, I’m just a damn truck number rite, everything is qualcom , **** this communication you speak of doesn’t really make any sense to me, I’m a social person, I would love to actually talk and get to know people I work with, not in trucking I guess, thank you old for all your input, I’ve been on this page and following you all since I made my mind up, no regrets.....

Jakester, honestly I don't think you can make that connection between staying out for months and getting great miles or long loads. Drivers create a relationship of trust with their dispatcher. That's accomplished by getting things done efficiently, safely, and without causing issues. I don't stay out for months at a time. I turn great miles and get great loads. Your buddies could do the same.

It's great that you're doing what you are, but it's not what's giving you success. You mentioned their attitudes. If that vibe is finding it's way to their dispatcher then that may very well be their biggest issue. It sounds like you're doing a great job. That's what establishes you and puts you in a position of being leaned on and trusted. They will trust you just as much if you decide you want to go home once a month.

When you are productive you will be trusted and given more responsibility. Productivity is the key. Being a slave to the road will cause lesser men than you to burn out. Don't fool yourself into thinking that's why you're getting great miles. You're getting those great loads because you are taking care of your business, and you are easy to work with. That's the golden formula.

Jakester, honestly I don't think you can make that connection between staying out for months and getting great miles or long loads. Drivers create a relationship of trust with their dispatcher. That's accomplished by getting things done efficiently, safely, and without causing issues. I don't stay out for months at a time. I turn great miles and get great loads. Your buddies could do the same.

It's great that you're doing what you are, but it's not what's giving you success. You mentioned their attitudes. If that vibe is finding it's way to their dispatcher then that may very well be their biggest issue. It sounds like you're doing a great job. That's what establishes you and puts you in a position of being leaned on and trusted. They will trust you just as much if you decide you want to go home once a month.

When you are productive you will be trusted and given more responsibility. Productivity is the key. Being a slave to the road will cause lesser men than you to burn out. Don't fool yourself into thinking that's why you're getting great miles. You're getting those great loads because you are taking care of your business, and you are easy to work with. That's the golden formula.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Jakester, you have been proving yourself to dispatch that you are a reliable, safe driver. That doesn't always require constant communication. Your arrival calls often work.

As far as being tired just pick a spot you want to take off for a few days and put in for your home time there. Don't burn yourself out. If you only need a couple of days off, just request it.

As far as your friends, like the others said their attitudes are most likely what's hurting them.

Good luck.

Spartan 's Comment
member avatar

Jakester, I can tell you are someone that is always staying steady and looking to keep going. That an awesome trait and work ethic. There are dispatchers that are not experienced and no nothing of the trucking side. All they worry about is the load and not the person, aka driver, taking care of the load. Just keep doing what you’re doing and there are those that notice. Trust me, because I have been in that situation. There is nothing wrong with someone that keeps on going, and enjoys the open road. Just make sure you take your time to rest, even if it is for a few days, and make sure you take care of you. This in return will reap benefits for you.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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