Which Type Of Trailer?

Topic 28095 | Page 1

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Jake L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, I’m looking for some help from the folks who know more than I do. I am not a driver but I need some advice.

I’ve been wanting to build a mobile tiny home/trailer and had planned on a regular trailer frame but I think I’d like the extra space a 53’ would allow.

I have limited knowledge of this format of trailer but I’m trying to decide between converting a dry van , using a flat bed as a frame (but most I see seem fairly bowed which wouldn’t be great for a floor), or using a container chassis as a foundation.

I would greatly appreciate opinion from you all who work and haul them everyday. Thanks in advance.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
40 Days's Comment
member avatar

Get a reefer it's got mild heat or at least keep from freezing and great a/c plus a steel floor for secure mounting and easy cleaning. Prolly off grid in a hot climate with some diesel. Flatbed frames are arched unless sufficient weight is put on them. When removed they spring back up.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Jake L.'s Comment
member avatar

I thought about one of those but I’m planning on framing the structure and using a mini split system for hvac. So sounds like the flat bed is out. Would there be any advantage to pulling the walls off a dry van vs using a chassis for a foundation? My uneducated eyeball guesstimated the container chassis set up was going to be more overkill than the trailer. But it might be a cleaner starting point.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

Jake L,

Have you considered a drop deck flatbed or a dry van like Frito-Lay uses? The step up could become a bedroom or living room like in most 5th wheel RV's around today. The drop deck flatbed would provide an excellent heavy frame for your project and more room for wiring, duct work and things like black water and grey water tanks.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Jake L.'s Comment
member avatar

Jake L,

Have you considered a drop deck flatbed or a dry van like Frito-Lay uses? The step up could become a bedroom or living room like in most 5th wheel RV's around today. The drop deck flatbed would provide an excellent heavy frame for your project and more room for wiring, duct work and things like black water and grey water tanks.

That’s a great idea! I like the idea of taking advantage of the split level for separating spaces. Heck, there might be room for a loft as well. Thank you for the reply.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Dan67's Comment
member avatar

Get a used metal mobile home trailer frame and build off that. A drop deck or flatbed trailer is deigned to carry a static and flex in the center to accommodate the weight. A van or refer trailer does not have a true frame under it and in fact is a giant bridge truss. If you mess with side rails or the top and bottom long rails it will fold with weight. So I'd advise sticking with a mobile home frame and build what ever you can dream including side outs.

Jake L.'s Comment
member avatar

Get a used metal mobile home trailer frame and build off that. A drop deck or flatbed trailer is deigned to carry a static and flex in the center to accommodate the weight. A van or refer trailer does not have a true frame under it and in fact is a giant bridge truss. If you mess with side rails or the top and bottom long rails it will fold with weight. So I'd advise sticking with a mobile home frame and build what ever you can dream including side outs.

Thanks. I didn’t realize they were built that way. I appreciate the insight

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, I’m looking for some help from the folks who know more than I do. I am not a driver but I need some advice.

I’ve been wanting to build a mobile tiny home/trailer and had planned on a regular trailer frame but I think I’d like the extra space a 53’ would allow.

I have limited knowledge of this format of trailer but I’m trying to decide between converting a dry van , using a flat bed as a frame (but most I see seem fairly bowed which wouldn’t be great for a floor), or using a container chassis as a foundation.

I would greatly appreciate opinion from you all who work and haul them everyday. Thanks in advance.

I would think you would be better of using a standard utility type trailer typical of tiny home usage. They can be purchased at most trailer or RV stores. If you try to build on a semi trailer you are modifying a trailer for a use it was not intended for and could have unintended consequences. If you use a 53' trailer it's no longer a tiny home anyways. Every type of semi trailer is purpose built and built for strength and stability based on each ones load use and once you modify it you have changed its design and basically nullified its strength and stability. A utility trailer on the other hand is designed for a multitude of different weights and loads and would handle a tiny house structure without altering it's intended use. As far as a mobile home frame, they are typically 14'-16' wide, not much fun to pull behind a personal vehicle. As for the dry van, the floor, walls and roof are all part of it structure and strength mess with any one and you end up with this

0845985001589073492.jpg0420353001589073543.jpg

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Jake L., what are you going to pull this trailer/house with upon completion? Seems if it were built on an already manufactured road use frame or chassis, it would need to pass state or federal inspection prior to being legal to tow on the road.

Jake L.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks. That’s definitely something I don’t want to take part in.

double-quotes-start.png

Hi, I’m looking for some help from the folks who know more than I do. I am not a driver but I need some advice.

I’ve been wanting to build a mobile tiny home/trailer and had planned on a regular trailer frame but I think I’d like the extra space a 53’ would allow.

I have limited knowledge of this format of trailer but I’m trying to decide between converting a dry van , using a flat bed as a frame (but most I see seem fairly bowed which wouldn’t be great for a floor), or using a container chassis as a foundation.

I would greatly appreciate opinion from you all who work and haul them everyday. Thanks in advance.

double-quotes-end.png

I would think you would be better of using a standard utility type trailer typical of tiny home usage. They can be purchased at most trailer or RV stores. If you try to build on a semi trailer you are modifying a trailer for a use it was not intended for and could have unintended consequences. If you use a 53' trailer it's no longer a tiny home anyways. Every type of semi trailer is purpose built and built for strength and stability based on each ones load use and once you modify it you have changed its design and basically nullified its strength and stability. A utility trailer on the other hand is designed for a multitude of different weights and loads and would handle a tiny house structure without altering it's intended use. As far as a mobile home frame, they are typically 14'-16' wide, not much fun to pull behind a personal vehicle. As for the dry van, the floor, walls and roof are all part of it structure and strength mess with any one and you end up with this

0845985001589073492.jpg0420353001589073543.jpg

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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