The More I Ask The Less I Know

Topic 28433 | Page 1

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Mike C.'s Comment
member avatar

Just before getting my CDL I admitted I'm a Newbe, an FNG, Stupid and would ask stupid questions. All are still correct except now I have my CDL. The more I try to learn about the trade the less I seem to know. So, with ya'lls patience, I'll continue to show my stupidity.

Prior to earning my CDL I learned about solo and team driving. Prior to graduating I did get a call from a company that only wanted teams, no solo. Repeating that I know nothing, team did not appeal to me. Still does' not.

BUT................................

As I wander thru the wilderness seeking employment it's taking the appearance that companies seem to be partial to team vs solo. Thats how it appears to me.

I'm an older guy. Living in a box with someone I dont know for prolonged periods of time does' not appeal to me a whole lot. I want to have a trainer period for maybe a month or so. I need that and I'm Ok with it. But, signing on with a company signing an agreement having to do with team driving I'm uncomfortable with.

Am I being unreasonable? Is team driving the way of the future as has been said to me? Do others have the same negativity as me regarding living with someone else (unknown person) for prolonged periods?

I have plenty more stupid questions to follow this one .

Thanks for your patience

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

No worries, Mike. Great questions.

Is team driving the way of the future as has been said to me?

rofl-3.gif

I laugh because I've been hearing that since I started in trucking in 1993.

No, teams are not the future of trucking. You have a massive variety of freight in this country and team operations are not efficient for most of it. There will always be a mix of team and solo operations.

Many companies, especially refrigerated carriers, take fantastic care of their teams because they can produce great money for the truck. But great solo drivers will always be valuable and necessary.

Do others have the same negativity as me regarding living with someone else (unknown person) for prolonged periods?

I do!!! Man, do I ever! I'm a loner. I've lived most of my life alone. Well, more specifically, with a dog.

You do not have to run team. There are plenty of great companies out there with solo operations. If you want to run solo, you can.

You do not have to run OTR and stay out for 3 - 4 weeks at a time, either. There are plenty of gigs for rookie drivers that will get you home on weekends. Some people love OTR, some would rather be home more often. It's just a personal preference.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Mike C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Brett

I think some things to you guys with experiance are also like speaking Chinese to a FNG like me.

I do not wish for team driving.

I'm sure it's fine for many but not for me.

I'm supposed to have (hopefully) more choices beginning tomorrow (Monday).

We'll see what comes .

I did actually have an immediate solo placement upon graduation however it was a week of orientation then solo with no trainer which I also did not want. I had actually posted my concerns re that on the forum .

Thanks for the reply

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Have you applied to the large carriers yet? You can apply to a bunch of them here:

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

The ones we don't work with directly you can apply for on their websites. Apply to a bunch of them and see who offers you a shot.

Mike C.'s Comment
member avatar

I did apply to one

That's part of my confusion and my concern.

I am of the opinion that applying to alot of companies is a bad mark on your DAC. I did also question that here on the forum and the one answer I got was not convincing to me but maybe it's because of how I framed the question. The way I asked the question was perhaps confusing. I had withdrawn from a orientation and asked if that was a bad reflection showing on my DAC. The answer I got was the withdrawel from the orientation might be a bad mark but the multi applications I did not get a clear answer to, at least to my mind. I withdrew from the company after four days of orientation because the company did not offer any trainer period. After about a one week or so orientation it was "here's a truck, seeya" I was not comfortable with that at all. I should not have begun the orientation at all but it really didn't dawn on me until into the orietation how ill equipped I was to be on my own with a truck right away. I did state my concerns here on the forum and came away feeling like I made the right decision by withdrawing from the emplyment.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Mike, you can apply to as many companies as you like. There's nothing about doing that which will affect your DAC negatively.

One thing that will limit your opportunities is to wait for several months before getting your first driving job. The companies willing to hire rookie drivers will consider a new license as "stale" if you delay your entry into the career after completing your schooling.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Mike C.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School

My CDL is dated 19 June, 2020

I had an immediate job but a one week orientation then I'm on my own, solo, with a truck scared me off.

I'm actively, right now, wanting a job and as a Team driver I can have one right now, but, I really do not want Team Driving.

Tampa Truck Driving School, thru their Tenn location is actively trying to place me. They're a very cooperative outfit and very helpful.

Yes, I do understand the "stale" issue. There was a guy in school with me that had to renew (whatever the right word is) his license because he was inactive for a period of time.

I told the Tenn location that if I had to Team then I would but I really dont want team driving.

One thing I sure have learned thru the entire journey, six weeks of a three week school (because i'm a Klutz), til now is that there's a hell of alot more to driving a truck than driving a truck.

People tend to view a truck driver with alot less respect than a driver has earned. I can pre flight a single engine airplane easier and faster than I can pre trip a truck and trailer. And, I 100% promise you, learning to fly is a hell of alot easier than learning to drive a semi. Airplanes only go forward and dont pull a 53' trailer behind them. Truck drivers are a very underestimated profession.

I got thru drivers school because it is a very good school and by the skin of my teeth.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big T's Comment
member avatar

Mike if multiple applications hurt your DAC this industry would collapse. A lot of drivers tend to job hop so they are always putting in new applications.

I would fill out the app on this site and between that and your school you should be in a truck soon.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Tampa Truck Driving School, thru their Tenn location is actively trying to place me. They're a very cooperative outfit and very helpful.

Mike, I went through all kinds of disappointing stuff starting my career. One of which was my school being unable to help me land the kind of driving job I wanted. They claimed they were trying to help me, but it wasn't helpful at all. Quit relying on them. Be proactive. So far they've hooked you up with a company that wanted to throw you to the wolves, and another one that wants to force you to team drive. That is not what I would describe as cooperative and very helpful.

Fill out the application we have provided you several different times in these conversations. You'll finally start getting contacted by companies that know how to help a rookie driver succeed.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Mike, I agree with Old School - stop waiting around for that school to help you. There's nothing they can do for you that you can't do for yourself. In fact, they're not even putting you with solid, reputable companies. They're going to hurt you a lot more than they'll help it seems. You have your CDL so their job is finished.

Start applying like crazy to all the major carriers and see who offers you a shot. If you get more than one offer, pick the one you feel suits you best and go for it. We'll help you decide if you're not sure. You could apply to 100 companies and no one would care. It's not a concern. But sitting around and letting your CDL go stale is a concern. So don't hesitate. Start applying everywhere and get the process started.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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