Prime Inc Lawsuit

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Matthew Z.'s Comment
member avatar

I seen Prime has finally settled the lawsuit and agreed to pay out $28 million to current and former drivers. The article I read made it sound like anyone who was employed with them during the time frame they gave will be included in the payout. I was curious if there is anything I need to do to add my name to the list or if I'm automatically included. Thanks!

Big T's Comment
member avatar

Were you a lease op?

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

This lawsuit also applies to anyone going through CDL schooling at Prime from 2010 to 2020. We signed a contract agreeing to get the schooling for free if we stay a year. Our schooling with our permit includes driving the truck OTR with an instructor making deliveries. Although we were OTR and working, we didn't get paid.

So part of this suit is that the students were doing work and not getting paid. The $200 advance for personal needs is not considered wages. The lawyers argued that students should be entitled to all benefits of a company driver.

This is going to be distributed amongst 40,000 people over the last 10 years, in addition to the money given to the lease ops. Anyone expecting a huge payout can forget it.

And honestly, even if I am one of the so called winners, I will add it to the Meals on Wheels donations on my YouTube channel.

To answer the original poster..... I think we are automatically included.

I for one am offended to be included in such a suit. I had great CDL experience with a permit that exceeded what some companies give to CDL holders. It put me way ahead of some drivers. And having someone "fight for my rights" is like telling me I am too stupid to understand and agree to the contract I signed and agreed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Penguin 's Comment
member avatar

“Our schooling with our permits includes driving the truck OTR with an instructor making deliveries“

I recently received my CDL through a private school. Before I attended school I did my research in regards to private school vs “paid CDL training. Looking back now that I have more knowledge about obtaining a CDL, I realize that during my research I had what I call “tunnel vision”. I only compared the financial side. IF I had to do it over, I would choose the “paid CDL training” because I would have loved driving a truck and making deliveries with my permit. With my private school training that opportunity was not an option. I think that kind of opportunity for training is priceless.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

“Our schooling with our permits includes driving the truck OTR with an instructor making deliveries“

I recently received my CDL through a private school. Before I attended school I did my research in regards to private school vs “paid CDL training. Looking back now that I have more knowledge about obtaining a CDL, I realize that during my research I had what I call “tunnel vision”. I only compared the financial side. IF I had to do it over, I would choose the “paid CDL training” because I would have loved driving a truck and making deliveries with my permit. With my private school training that opportunity was not an option. I think that kind of opportunity for training is priceless.

In addition to the deliveries... It gives you not only one on one training.... But a chance to decide IF you even like the job. Some people just cannot do it. Our contract had an option that if you decided it wasn't for you before you tested, you could void the contract.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Matthew Z.'s Comment
member avatar

This lawsuit also applies to anyone going through CDL schooling at Prime from 2010 to 2020. We signed a contract agreeing to get the schooling for free if we stay a year. Our schooling with our permit includes driving the truck OTR with an instructor making deliveries. Although we were OTR and working, we didn't get paid.

So part of this suit is that the students were doing work and not getting paid. The $200 advance for personal needs is not considered wages. The lawyers argued that students should be entitled to all benefits of a company driver.

This is going to be distributed amongst 40,000 people over the last 10 years, in addition to the money given to the lease ops. Anyone expecting a huge payout can forget it.

And honestly, even if I am one of the so called winners, I will add it to the Meals on Wheels donations on my YouTube channel.

To answer the original poster..... I think we are automatically included.

I for one am offended to be included in such a suit. I had great CDL experience with a permit that exceeded what some companies give to CDL holders. It put me way ahead of some drivers. And having someone "fight for my rights" is like telling me I am too stupid to understand and agree to the contract I signed and agreed.

I don't mind being included in it. I had a somewhat decent experience. I had a good flatbed trainer and a decent reefer trainer. After training, I felt like I was just a number. I know that's how it is with all big companies, but I felt things could've been a little different.

I hated the fact that we weren't paid during the first part of training and had to repay the weekly $200. I don't know why Prime did that other than to save money.

I just found another article on the lawsuit. It says at least $14 million will be set aside to be distributed in full, with another $14 million available, depending on how many Prime drivers join the class-action settlement.

That right there tells me there may be something we may need to do to be included. Not sure though. It also states funds will be distributed based on tenure at the company and other factors. All members will receive atleast $100.

It may not be much but I was screwed over many times with Prime. My dispatcher would get my load wrong and I'd have to sit for a few days and he says he'll make it up. I get my check and there's an extra $20 on there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar
I'd have to sit for a few days and he says he'll make it up. I get my check and there's an extra $20 on there.

I find this part hard to believe. Layover pay has changed over the years but it was never under $65 while I have been here. Sorry. Were you lease? Because perhaps "I will make it up" meant a good paying load next. IDK.

Again, if you hated not getting paid during schooling, why did you agree to it? Because otherwise you would need thousands of dollars for school perhaps?

Penguin 's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

This lawsuit also applies to anyone going through CDL schooling at Prime from 2010 to 2020. We signed a contract agreeing to get the schooling for free if we stay a year. Our schooling with our permit includes driving the truck OTR with an instructor making deliveries. Although we were OTR and working, we didn't get paid.

So part of this suit is that the students were doing work and not getting paid. The $200 advance for personal needs is not considered wages. The lawyers argued that students should be entitled to all benefits of a company driver.

This is going to be distributed amongst 40,000 people over the last 10 years, in addition to the money given to the lease ops. Anyone expecting a huge payout can forget it.

And honestly, even if I am one of the so called winners, I will add it to the Meals on Wheels donations on my YouTube channel.

To answer the original poster..... I think we are automatically included.

I for one am offended to be included in such a suit. I had great CDL experience with a permit that exceeded what some companies give to CDL holders. It put me way ahead of some drivers. And having someone "fight for my rights" is like telling me I am too stupid to understand and agree to the contract I signed and agreed.

double-quotes-end.png

I don't mind being included in it. I had a somewhat decent experience. I had a good flatbed trainer and a decent reefer trainer. After training, I felt like I was just a number. I know that's how it is with all big companies, but I felt things could've been a little different.

I hated the fact that we weren't paid during the first part of training and had to repay the weekly $200. I don't know why Prime did that other than to save money.

I just found another article on the lawsuit. It says at least $14 million will be set aside to be distributed in full, with another $14 million available, depending on how many Prime drivers join the class-action settlement.

That right there tells me there may be something we may need to do to be included. Not sure though. It also states funds will be distributed based on tenure at the company and other factors. All members will receive atleast $100.

It may not be much but I was screwed over many times with Prime. My dispatcher would get my load wrong and I'd have to sit for a few days and he says he'll make it up. I get my check and there's an extra $20 on there.

Matthew, I attended a private school AND they did not pay me (lol). I actually paid them $4,500. And, the opportunity to make deliveries with my permit was not given.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Matthew Z.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'd have to sit for a few days and he says he'll make it up. I get my check and there's an extra $20 on there.

double-quotes-end.png

I find this part hard to believe. Layover pay has changed over the years but it was never under $65 while I have been here. Sorry. Were you lease? Because perhaps "I will make it up" meant a good paying load next. IDK.

Again, if you hated not getting paid during schooling, why did you agree to it? Because otherwise you would need thousands of dollars for school perhaps?

It is quite true. Happened on many occasions. I'm not a people person so I didn't bother with it. Just irritated me since most of the times it happened I was coming off of home time and would sit for a few days a couple hours away. I was company by the way. I averaged about the same amount of miles every week so theres no making it up in that way.

I chose to go to Prime merely for the convenience of not living far out from the Springfield, MO terminal. It was easy to get loads and take back to the yard for a swap and head home. I had some extra money so not being paid wasn't a huge deal, but running flatbed makes you wish you were being paid. I was brand new to the trucking world and the person I looked up to for advice had passed away a year before I went to Prime. I didn't know where to start at. I didn't have the money to pay for schooling. At the time Prime seemed to be the best fit for me.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Matthew Z.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

This lawsuit also applies to anyone going through CDL schooling at Prime from 2010 to 2020. We signed a contract agreeing to get the schooling for free if we stay a year. Our schooling with our permit includes driving the truck OTR with an instructor making deliveries. Although we were OTR and working, we didn't get paid.

So part of this suit is that the students were doing work and not getting paid. The $200 advance for personal needs is not considered wages. The lawyers argued that students should be entitled to all benefits of a company driver.

This is going to be distributed amongst 40,000 people over the last 10 years, in addition to the money given to the lease ops. Anyone expecting a huge payout can forget it.

And honestly, even if I am one of the so called winners, I will add it to the Meals on Wheels donations on my YouTube channel.

To answer the original poster..... I think we are automatically included.

I for one am offended to be included in such a suit. I had great CDL experience with a permit that exceeded what some companies give to CDL holders. It put me way ahead of some drivers. And having someone "fight for my rights" is like telling me I am too stupid to understand and agree to the contract I signed and agreed.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I don't mind being included in it. I had a somewhat decent experience. I had a good flatbed trainer and a decent reefer trainer. After training, I felt like I was just a number. I know that's how it is with all big companies, but I felt things could've been a little different.

I hated the fact that we weren't paid during the first part of training and had to repay the weekly $200. I don't know why Prime did that other than to save money.

I just found another article on the lawsuit. It says at least $14 million will be set aside to be distributed in full, with another $14 million available, depending on how many Prime drivers join the class-action settlement.

That right there tells me there may be something we may need to do to be included. Not sure though. It also states funds will be distributed based on tenure at the company and other factors. All members will receive atleast $100.

It may not be much but I was screwed over many times with Prime. My dispatcher would get my load wrong and I'd have to sit for a few days and he says he'll make it up. I get my check and there's an extra $20 on there.

double-quotes-end.png

Matthew, I attended a private school AND they did not pay me (lol). I actually paid them $4,500. And, the opportunity to make deliveries with my permit was not given.

So you did not perform any duties for them while in training? How is this comparable to being at Prime, training, yet still performing duties as an employee?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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