Drivers That Don't Have An APU On The Truck !

Topic 28599 | Page 1

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Dodge Dart's Comment
member avatar

Hello to everyone on trucking truth, this is an awsome site. You really tell it like it is and it's fun to read about trucking here. My question is, how do you guys and ladies deal with the no idle laws in states like NJ when it's 90 degrees out and your truck has no apu? Truck stops and rest areas can smell like diesel fumes on a warm humid night and if you slept with your windows down would you feel unsafe? The only reason I know about the no idle laws and the fumes is because I used to stop at the Vince Lombardi rest area on the NJ Turnpike all the time on my way to Newark Airport. Also, can you be fined for idling in those states and who would pay that fine? The driver or your company?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

I go to all those states and don’t have an APU. I have yet to have any sort of issue idling at night and honestly don’t worry about it. If someone wants to write a ticket, so be it, the owner will pay it. In regards to fuel economy, doing heavy haul kills any dreams of fuel economy so it’s really not much of an issue lol. I average 4 - 4.3mpg.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I completely agree with Robert. I've never seen anyone willing to enforce those laws. Occasionally you'll hear some driver talking about how his second cousin's little brother got a fine for 500 dollars, but first hand accounts are really rare. Truckers are famous for these type stories - most are total fabrication, but interesting nonetheless.

I remember as a rookie taking my first run to California. I was nervous about having to sleep in the California heat with my windows down. As soon as I pulled into the truck stop, I realized everyone was idling their trucks. I've never had any reservations about idling anywhere since that time.

Here's an interesting statistic I came across once. Only about 2 percent of trucks on the road have an APU. That means 98% of us rely on our engine idling so we can get the proper rest. Also, it's important to realize that modern trucks generally have "California Certified Clean Idle" engines in them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Personally, I pay no attention to no idling signs unless it's on a customers property. If I'm at a truckstop or rest area I idle...period. The only way I can see someone getting an idle ticket is like you see on tv where the busybody NYC resident is going around Work sites filming the work trucks idle while the workers are out working. Generally speaking the LEOs fully understand that it is dangerous and deadly to expect a truck driver to sleep in an oven. When temperatures outside climb in range from 80 degrees to 100 degrees, the internal temperature of your truck can reach a scorching 130 to 172. I've never been bothered over idling and if my truck will idle it's going to idle. I'm all about comfort and safety. Once i parked at a small store in Maine with room for 5 trucks. They specifically asked me not to idle if i stayed there as there were homes right behind the fence, i honored their request and i also never stayed there again. With the cost of an APU around the $10,000 mark many companies are not interested in the investment. A cop would have to be a real ahole to ticket a driver for idling while occupying his truck, fortunately most are good people.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Brandon Kitts's Comment
member avatar

Our trucks at Roehl are clean idle certified. So often times our exhaust is cleaner than the air it pulls in. Lol

Uncle Rake's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for this question and thanks for all of the helpful replies. I had read similar articles and had the same question.

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