HATE Dealing With People!!

Topic 28665 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

I have a problem dealing with people.

It's not so much I'm incapable of dealing with people when needed, but...

I much rather keep to myself and hate socializing, "shooting the sh*t, or any other BS niceties...

In my past jobs people just end up not liking me and saying I'm rude or whatever.

I try to keep my head down, not bother anyone, and just do my work... but I also don't like saying hi, bye, thank you, or any of that other stuff.

I've quit/got fired from several jobs already because of this.

So, as one of my last resorts... I've decided to get my CDL-A and give trucking a try.

With that said, I'm aware that there is still some interactions that I will have to do... but I'm trying to learn which type of trucking may involve the least.

I was thinking about OTR trucking for the longest trips that are available, hoping I can get loads going to different places and different people.

I'm not as concerned about pay, hard work, home time, etc... just minimal interactions and preferably not running into the same people.

Your suggestions and inputs are very appreciated!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

If you hate dealing with people that bad, honestly this job is probably not for you.

BubblesDhaDrivah's Comment
member avatar

Godsgift. I don't hate dealing with people,ok maybe SOMETIMES. But totally get it. I'm an sorta an introvert myself. I'm on the shy side when talking to people. Only have time to talk to people when it's more work related than personal related things. I still say my "please" and "Thank you" cause it's a very respectful thing to do ya know.I told myself "If you wanna get smacked in the mouth,be sour". I'm new myself in joining the trucking industry. I would like to add on what Parrothead66 said. Are you sure you're ready to join the trucking world. You WILL be dealing with alot of communication. Besides dealing with traffic aka people in vehicles,shippers,receivers & your dispatcher , your gonna be doing alot of communication. This industry is definitely not all about traveling from A to B to get items/equipment where they need to go,you will be main protagonist that everyone will need to get to. But like I said before,I'm sorta an introvert myself but when it comes to work related things,I'm going to talk that person's ear off (hopefully not literally). Just my little ole .02. Goodluck in your journey. And hopefully I didn't come off as snappy...or confusing. I have a tendency to do both sometimes...even by accident 🤦🏼‍♀️. Oh did I mention I'm SUPER NEW to this industry as well.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Moe's Comment
member avatar

Yea I second what Parrot said. If you can't handle people that much than this gig is probably not for you.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yea I second what Parrot said. If you can't handle people that much than this gig is probably not for you.

Lmao Moe, so you are parroting what parrot said...

I have a problem dealing with people.

It's not so much I'm incapable of dealing with people when needed, but...

I much rather keep to myself and hate socializing, "shooting the sh*t, or any other BS niceties...

In my past jobs people just end up not liking me and saying I'm rude or whatever.

I try to keep my head down, not bother anyone, and just do my work... but I also don't like saying hi, bye, thank you, or any of that other stuff.

I've quit/got fired from several jobs already because of this.

So, as one of my last resorts... I've decided to get my CDL-A and give trucking a try.

With that said, I'm aware that there is still some interactions that I will have to do... but I'm trying to learn which type of trucking may involve the least.

I was thinking about OTR trucking for the longest trips that are available, hoping I can get loads going to different places and different people.

I'm not as concerned about pay, hard work, home time, etc... just minimal interactions and preferably not running into the same people.

Your suggestions and inputs are very appreciated!

I have a pretty good idea of how you are, heck, I may have worked with you before at the Post Office. I had a coworker just like what you describe. I have to disagree with some and say that IF you can function normally, know when and how to talk to shippers and receivers without losing your cool with them as well as communicating with your dispatcher daily without showing your A** or getting threatening or violent then trucking my fit you well. If you have trouble maintaining your temper or tend to go off on people or are violent in ANY way then no, it's not for you. I don't generally care for people myself but I can and do talk to and communicate calmly and clearly with them on a regular basis. You don't have to want to talk to them however if you can do so without scaring them or going off on them there shouldn't be an issue. First time you go off on a customer your company will get a phone call and then they will call you. Other than customers and dispatchers you dont have much interaction with people unless you want to. So you know yourself, can you do these things in the right way or not?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

If you hate dealing with people that bad, honestly this job is probably not for you.

That really doesn't help much.

This is a "last resorts" type of situation... meaning I don't have many options left and I've already decided and committed to doing this.

At this point, just would appreciate anyone that can help me with the info that I've asked.

Thanks...

Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

Godsgift. I don't hate dealing with people,ok maybe SOMETIMES. But totally get it. I'm an sorta an introvert myself. I'm on the shy side when talking to people. Only have time to talk to people when it's more work related than personal related things. I still say my "please" and "Thank you" cause it's a very respectful thing to do ya know.I told myself "If you wanna get smacked in the mouth,be sour". I'm new myself in joining the trucking industry. I would like to add on what Parrothead66 said. Are you sure you're ready to join the trucking world. You WILL be dealing with alot of communication. Besides dealing with traffic aka people in vehicles,shippers,receivers & your dispatcher , your gonna be doing alot of communication. This industry is definitely not all about traveling from A to B to get items/equipment where they need to go,you will be main protagonist that everyone will need to get to. But like I said before,I'm sorta an introvert myself but when it comes to work related things,I'm going to talk that person's ear off (hopefully not literally). Just my little ole .02. Goodluck in your journey. And hopefully I didn't come off as snappy...or confusing. I have a tendency to do both sometimes...even by accident 🤦🏼‍♀️. Oh did I mention I'm SUPER NEW to this industry as well.

I understand and hear what you're saying... as I initially mentioned, I do understand that I will have to deal with people.

I'm not expecting to make deliveries inside an empty box by myself and never talk to anyone ever or anything...

Probably similar to you, I'm able to deal with people as needed...

it's just that I'm trying to keep it to a minimum and asking for peoples' input as to which type of trucking would be best suited for that.

Thanks for your reply...

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

If you hate dealing with people that bad, honestly this job is probably not for you.

double-quotes-end.png

That really doesn't help much.

This is a "last resorts" type of situation... meaning I don't have many options left and I've already decided and committed to doing this.

At this point, just would appreciate anyone that can help me with the info that I've asked.

Thanks...

Why doesn't it help much? It answers the question you were asking.

My grandma always said, "Kill em with kindness" because life will not go well for you if you're a jerk. It's as simple as that.

Being kind to people is important. People will normally mirror your attitudes and behaviors back at you. If you think most people are intolerable, most people feel the same about you. If that's the case then no one will want to do you any favors, and they will often be happy if they can make you miserable. They'll have plenty of opportunities to do that if you're a truck driver.

If you're miserable, then you're used to life not going your way. That won't change if you become a miserable truck driver, or anything else. Things will not go well for you.

Some people never figure out why it's important to be kind to people. That simple premise eludes them. Well, there's a song for people like that from Roger Alan Wade, "If You're Gonne Be Dumb, Ya Gotta Be Tough."

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
BubblesDhaDrivah's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Godsgift. I don't hate dealing with people,ok maybe SOMETIMES. But totally get it. I'm an sorta an introvert myself. I'm on the shy side when talking to people. Only have time to talk to people when it's more work related than personal related things. I still say my "please" and "Thank you" cause it's a very respectful thing to do ya know.I told myself "If you wanna get smacked in the mouth,be sour". I'm new myself in joining the trucking industry. I would like to add on what Parrothead66 said. Are you sure you're ready to join the trucking world. You WILL be dealing with alot of communication. Besides dealing with traffic aka people in vehicles,shippers,receivers & your dispatcher , your gonna be doing alot of communication. This industry is definitely not all about traveling from A to B to get items/equipment where they need to go,you will be main protagonist that everyone will need to get to. But like I said before,I'm sorta an introvert myself but when it comes to work related things,I'm going to talk that person's ear off (hopefully not literally). Just my little ole .02. Goodluck in your journey. And hopefully I didn't come off as snappy...or confusing. I have a tendency to do both sometimes...even by accident 🤦🏼‍♀️. Oh did I mention I'm SUPER NEW to this industry as well.

double-quotes-end.png

I understand and hear what you're saying... as I initially mentioned, I do understand that I will have to deal with people.

I'm not expecting to make deliveries inside an empty box by myself and never talk to anyone ever or anything...

Probably similar to you, I'm able to deal with people as needed...

it's just that I'm trying to keep it to a minimum and asking for peoples' input as to which type of trucking would be best suited for that.

Thanks for your reply...

Totally get what you're saying. For me otr is probably your best bet. Now I agree with Mikey B for sure. If you can work without showing you're not really a people's person and respectful,You will do absolutely amazing. Like I said I'm not to much a people's person as I'm extremely shy. But as soon as I get the working and talking to people who I talk business with,HECK you wouldn't even know. And since this is your "last resort". You're definitely gonna be working your hardest while SOMEWHAT,over coming this. I was gonna blow ya up with the "well you should definitely make a career change man". But I had to stop myself cause it definitely hit home for me. It's a reason for how a person is. If you're a hard working man/woman you wouldn't let this interfere with your worklife. You've now made a commitment to this career (as you have stated) it's time to bring your A game. Wishing you all the best. And updates into your journey would be nice

P.S: Also with your shippers, receivers and dispatcher and just anyone in general a good ole thanks would kill ya every once in a while :). My small .02. Also extremely sorry if some of my sentences are confusing it's 5am and haven't been to sleep since yesterday...

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Yea I second what Parrot said. If you can't handle people that much than this gig is probably not for you.

double-quotes-end.png

Lmao Moe, so you are parroting what parrot said...

double-quotes-start.png

I have a problem dealing with people.

It's not so much I'm incapable of dealing with people when needed, but...

I much rather keep to myself and hate socializing, "shooting the sh*t, or any other BS niceties...

In my past jobs people just end up not liking me and saying I'm rude or whatever.

I try to keep my head down, not bother anyone, and just do my work... but I also don't like saying hi, bye, thank you, or any of that other stuff.

I've quit/got fired from several jobs already because of this.

So, as one of my last resorts... I've decided to get my CDL-A and give trucking a try.

With that said, I'm aware that there is still some interactions that I will have to do... but I'm trying to learn which type of trucking may involve the least.

I was thinking about OTR trucking for the longest trips that are available, hoping I can get loads going to different places and different people.

I'm not as concerned about pay, hard work, home time, etc... just minimal interactions and preferably not running into the same people.

Your suggestions and inputs are very appreciated!

double-quotes-end.png

I have a pretty good idea of how you are, heck, I may have worked with you before at the Post Office. I had a coworker just like what you describe. I have to disagree with some and say that IF you can function normally, know when and how to talk to shippers and receivers without losing your cool with them as well as communicating with your dispatcher daily without showing your A** or getting threatening or violent then trucking my fit you well. If you have trouble maintaining your temper or tend to go off on people or are violent in ANY way then no, it's not for you. I don't generally care for people myself but I can and do talk to and communicate calmly and clearly with them on a regular basis. You don't have to want to talk to them however if you can do so without scaring them or going off on them there shouldn't be an issue. First time you go off on a customer your company will get a phone call and then they will call you. Other than customers and dispatchers you dont have much interaction with people unless you want to. So you know yourself, can you do these things in the right way or not?

Yea, that's more or less how I try to do...

Did you have any specific suggestions for the type of trucking that may best suit what I'm looking for?

I was thinking of OTR for as long of distances that are available... and definitely not regional or dedicated...

Being brand new, I'm not sure if my thinking along these lines is correct though...

Do OTR drivers typically go to the same places or does it usually vary?

Thanks for your input.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Becoming A Truck Driver Choosing A Trucking Company Truck Driving Lifestyle
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More