XPO Logistics P&D LTL

Topic 28676 | Page 2

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Johnboy's Comment
member avatar

Funnily enough literally as i was waiting to take my cdl exam a couple years ago a saia driver came up to me and told me to quit prime and apply to saia “ you’ll make more money “ he said lol. Glad i got the OTR experience and didnt screw over prime but maybe he was right about the money.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

John boy, I've been reading all of this with interest. Here's my biggest concern...

My girlfriend wants me off the road and i gotta admit im not cut out for not having a home life.

Have you considered getting out of trucking? Would you like to start a family with this girlfriend? Do you think working for a LTL outfit will give you a "home life?"

I just see a lot of questions you and your girlfriend need to be tackling. I'm not sure the two of you are on the same page. If you're not, you need to have some serious discussions about your objectives. LTL work pays well, but the low seniority guys are generally given the less desirable jobs for the first two or three years. That means working the night shift. That's certainly not going to give you any sort of home life.

You seem to be hung up on finding helpful research on LTL companies when the biggest research you need to be doing is, "What exactly is this girlfriend of mine looking for?" Get that settled first. It may change your whole direction - it may change a lot of things. That's the way I see it.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Johnboy's Comment
member avatar

Old school- Yup thats the plan so far. Get married have kids. also planning a move out west in about 2 years (montana/utah/idaho) which is part of my job search in LTL in regards to companies that i can transfer out west with. I also should say that you are sniffin up the right tree with getting out of trucking. I have no intention of staying in the industry more than 5 years most likely. Just isnt for me . If i have to be in it longer i will, but the plan is to start a plumber apprenticeship / try to join firefighters or something along those lines once we move out west. There are many reasons for me not just quitting altogether and restarting, the biggest of which is the uncertainty we are facing with rona and the economy. But for the time being trucking is where my paycheck is at , need to save , and its a convenient job to move out west with and something id like to fall back on if need be in the next decade. if i need to fall back on it in the future id like to get at least 3 years continuous experience under my belt as A job safety net for the next ten years . Most trade apprenticeships take longer than 2 years and thats my timeline for getting off the east coast , thus the reason for transition to local for a period of time till we get settled out west (instead of just starting apprenticeship now). I know thats all complicated and such which is why i didnt get into it but i figured id reveal that since ur barkin up that tree. Thanks for the insight. Your comments are always appreciated.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Howdy. I do P&D with OD. Allow me to clarify this night shift but people keep bringing up. There is no 6pm to 6am nightshift in P&D because we deliver to businesses that are your typical 9-5. Low seniority guys usually start after 9am (as late as 1200) and will usually always be done before 2200. There was only two times ever that I worked an odd schedule and that was because they had a delivery to a port and it needed to be there by 0400 or the shipping was on us. The other time was because I had to confuct fuel efficiency training on all the overnight linehaul drivers. Yeah you'll have to do your time on the bottom but even at its worst, the schedule isn't anything as bad and unpredictable as OTR.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Johnboy's Comment
member avatar

Yeah you'll have to do your time on the bottom but even at its worst, the schedule isn't anything as bad and unpredictable as OTR.

Right on , the unpredictability of hours in otr is one of my least favorite aspects of the job. I was definitely naive when i first got into the game, thinking it would provide me with more freedom. (To be fair that has to do with how hard i run my clock and the truck and therefore dispatch has been running me as tight as possible for awhile now) The last 15 months on the road have felt like less freedom than a 9-5 . But thats just me . Im sure theres plenty of folks that would disagree. Thanks for the insight on P &D

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Howdy. I do P&D with OD. Allow me to clarify this night shift but people keep bringing up. There is no 6pm to 6am nightshift in P&D because we deliver to businesses that are your typical 9-5. Low seniority guys usually start after 9am (as late as 1200) and will usually always be done before 2200. There was only two times ever that I worked an odd schedule and that was because they had a delivery to a port and it needed to be there by 0400 or the shipping was on us. The other time was because I had to confuct fuel efficiency training on all the overnight linehaul drivers. Yeah you'll have to do your time on the bottom but even at its worst, the schedule isn't anything as bad and unpredictable as OTR.

OD doesn't do nights for P&D drivers, but most LTL companies do and XPO is one of them. I'm classified as a P&D driver and I have a 2 AM start time. I work the dock if that's what's needed and I run linehaul if that's what's needed. Some days I work the dock for a few hours and then run linehaul.

XPO, USPF, ABF, FXF and a bunch of others operate this way. I have no idea what time I'm finishing work, I only know that I come in at 2 and if we're busy (after everything opened from COVID or after a snow storm) I'm working weekends too.

Also, if you're looking into starting a family do some research. I hear horrible things about XPOs benefits. High deductibles and high premiums. Just food for thought.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Howdy. I do P&D with OD. Allow me to clarify this night shift but people keep bringing up. There is no 6pm to 6am nightshift in P&D because we deliver to businesses that are your typical 9-5. Low seniority guys usually start after 9am (as late as 1200) and will usually always be done before 2200. There was only two times ever that I worked an odd schedule and that was because they had a delivery to a port and it needed to be there by 0400 or the shipping was on us. The other time was because I had to confuct fuel efficiency training on all the overnight linehaul drivers. Yeah you'll have to do your time on the bottom but even at its worst, the schedule isn't anything as bad and unpredictable as OTR.

double-quotes-end.png

OD doesn't do nights for P&D drivers, but most LTL companies do and XPO is one of them. I'm classified as a P&D driver and I have a 2 AM start time. I work the dock if that's what's needed and I run linehaul if that's what's needed. Some days I work the dock for a few hours and then run linehaul.

XPO, USPF, ABF, FXF and a bunch of others operate this way. I have no idea what time I'm finishing work, I only know that I come in at 2 and if we're busy (after everything opened from COVID or after a snow storm) I'm working weekends too.

Also, if you're looking into starting a family do some research. I hear horrible things about XPOs benefits. High deductibles and high premiums. Just food for thought.

Correct but you would be classified as a combo driver. I'm talking about a fulltime P&D who only does deliveries and pickups

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Banks's Comment
member avatar
Correct but you would be classified as a combo driver. I'm talking about a fulltime P&D who only does deliveries and pickups

No sir, FedEx has me classified as a P&D driver. If you get hired as a P&D driver at FedEx you'd be doing what I do starting at the bottom, depending on the building of course. They don't all operate the same.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

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