XPO Logistics P&D LTL

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Johnboy's Comment
member avatar

Hello all,

Hope all is well... Been awhile since i posted on the site. I’m a Prime driver running OTR reefer. So far Prime has treated me pretty well and for my first 15 months of trucking i can’t really complain about the paychecks. However, My girlfriend wants me off the road and i gotta admit im not cut out for not having a home life. So I recently applied to XPO logistics and have an interview setup for next time im home. Wondering if there are any local P&D drivers from XPO on here that might have some insight on the company, if they are trustworthy with their follow thru on offerings and their general feeling towarss the job. Most info online seems more to do with their buyout history with conway/CFI and less to do with the job. Im assuming local guys just have less sitting time on their hands and thats why theres not a ton of driver testimonials online. Im aware LTL is a totally different job than OTR and most of the week is just work>home>sleep>work , lots of tight backing, residential, city, pallet jacks and dock work , but if i get nights and weekends with the girlfriend and make comperable money to OTR im fine with that. Also really wouldnt mind the forced excercise , OTR is packing on the belly fat. Anyways. Any thoughts on XPO from some experienced guys and gals out there? Any info would be much appreciated . Especially regarding north east LTL (pennsylvania)

Topics interested in

Graduated payscale timing? Set or earned?

Average hours worked? (Pennsylvania)

Turnover rate for XPO?

Management Competence?

Safety and equipment quality?

Benefits? (Expense and quality)

Anything else you might think is helpful

Thanks And stay safe

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hello all,

Hope all is well... Been awhile since i posted on the site. I’m a Prime driver running OTR reefer. So far Prime has treated me pretty well and for my first 15 months of trucking i can’t really complain about the paychecks. However, My girlfriend wants me off the road and i gotta admit im not cut out for not having a home life. So I recently applied to XPO logistics and have an interview setup for next time im home. Wondering if there are any local P&D drivers from XPO on here that might have some insight on the company, if they are trustworthy with their follow thru on offerings and their general feeling towarss the job. Most info online seems more to do with their buyout history with conway/CFI and less to do with the job. Im assuming local guys just have less sitting time on their hands and thats why theres not a ton of driver testimonials online. Im aware LTL is a totally different job than OTR and most of the week is just work>home>sleep>work , lots of tight backing, residential, city, pallet jacks and dock work , but if i get nights and weekends with the girlfriend and make comperable money to OTR im fine with that. Also really wouldnt mind the forced excercise , OTR is packing on the belly fat. Anyways. Any thoughts on XPO from some experienced guys and gals out there? Any info would be much appreciated . Especially regarding north east LTL (pennsylvania)

Topics interested in

Graduated payscale timing? Set or earned?

Average hours worked? (Pennsylvania)

Turnover rate for XPO?

Management Competence?

Safety and equipment quality?

Benefits? (Expense and quality)

Anything else you might think is helpful

Thanks And stay safe

LTL drivers on here to my knowledge, are:

Bobcat Bob ~ ODFL

Daniel B. ~ Same, perhaps? (He's elusive anymore, haha!)

Banks ~ Fedex / FXF

Auggie69 ~ Fedex as well. (triples, according to his avi.)

(My husband used to run teams for FX/LH years ago, under a contractor, teaming. Not much help!)

Big Scott ~ CFI and trainer. He may have insight into XPO; I know he's mentioned them in the past, more than once.

Not sure of XPO, but Bobcat Bob knows a LOT of people in the LTL industry, so hopefully he can offer up some help~!

confused.gifgood-luck.gifconfused.gif

WISH YOU WELL~!!! :) (I remember you from a year or so back...doesn't Prime have anything regional that would get you home more often?)

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Johnboy's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the reply, im not expecting a ton of feedback i just figured id give it a try. Doesnt seem to be as much information on LTL as a whole out there. Found one guy on Youtube who just started at XPO around 6 months to a year ago i think.

Regarding Prime- i have asked them about a local dedicated route in my area and i havent gotten any sort of feedback. I actually did my PsD training preCDL on a local shuttle route in maryland/PA with prime. (My first trainer is back OTR cus the contract got outbid) Did TNT over the road. Local routes here get jumped on pretty fast and i dont really know a single driver who hasnt been pulled off a local account and sent out OTR eventually whether its because of company need or because they got outbid on the local contract by another carrier. I would stay here if they had something i knew i could get home every night and have 1 -2 days off a week with family, but i just dont think itll happen anytime soon and even if it did the job would end eventually and id be back over the road.

Also. Maybe a stupid thought but i do very much like the idea of getting back to being paid by the hour. Although i sincerely think Prime is a great OTR company to work for, they have a lot of the same pitfalls as any OTR company, no one is perfect. Local routes at prime are not hourly, they are flat rate weeks. Means you generally get paid a certain lump sum for the week whether its slow or heavy. Can be good and bad depending on how your week goes. There are lots of things i just do not get paid for OTR and the paycheck is sometimes parabolic due to that. I make good money as a rookie believe me , but id rather move to a payscale where i get paid for ALL of my work. But thats just me, im sure ill have some people who disagree. Just my personal experience thats all.

Again Prime was great to me my first year. Any mistakes i made they helped me get through it. I think i cleared around 40-45k my first year. I had some issues with dispatching and sales decisions of course and it is frustrating, but at the end of the day thats just truckin’ . Its gonna happen. I mean jeez im sitting down here 30 minutes away from my 90 right now for an extra 2 days because i tried to deliver yesterday and found someone forgot to schedule my appointment correctly and they had to reschedule it. But it is what it is 🤷🏻‍♂️I am realizing this isnt a sustainable lifestyle for me and i wanna try out LTL to see if it fits better. If i was a single man with no prospects of starting a family id probably stay OTR. If it doesnt work out well....im you g and theres always plumbing 😉

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

That's funny; 'You're young and there's always plumbing!'

rofl-3.gifrofl-3.gifrofl-1.gifrofl-1.gifrofl-3.gifrofl-3.gif

On a serious note, one of our members works for H.O. Wolding, and gets paid hourly, and is quite happy there. Here's a list of his comments for you to scroll through:

Grumpy Old Man / H.O. Wolding

Wish you the best; let us know how it turns out~!

Anne :)

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately I do not know much of the P&D side of XPO, my dad worked at Con-Way for 28 years until XPO bought them then a lot of former Con-Way people moved on some voluntary a lot involuntary. There are a lot of former XPO drivers that came to OD for various reasons.

I know their equipment is very hit and miss they still use Sterlings which are at least 11 years old as they went out of business in 09.

Most LTL pay is based on seniority, your pay raises are will be based on time with the company at OD its 6, 12 and 24 months I'd imagine they do it in a similar fashion.

Usually they don't let you sit too long, if you get to a place and they are not ready you skip them and move on, it will definitely be a faster pace then you are used to.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Johnboy's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the response. I was looking at old dominion but their closest terminals are 40-60 miles from where i live so i dont think it would work. I dont want to spemd 2 hrs-3 hrs of my 10 hr break commuting. It seems old dominion definitely has a better reputation online. Its a bummer too cus OD is advertising line haul jobs right now in PA and id rather do that. However xpo is 10 miles away from my house so thats why i chose to apply with them. They also seem pretty desperate for drivers right now. Not sure if you’ve noticed this at OD? Im gonna ask the manager if its due to logistics need or turnover rate.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Jay F.'s Comment
member avatar

How about saia, or estes? Both get very high marks. I agree that OD is the cream of the crop

Thanks for the response. I was looking at old dominion but their closest terminals are 40-60 miles from where i live so i dont think it would work. I dont want to spemd 2 hrs-3 hrs of my 10 hr break commuting. It seems old dominion definitely has a better reputation online. Its a bummer too cus OD is advertising line haul jobs right now in PA and id rather do that. However xpo is 10 miles away from my house so thats why i chose to apply with them. They also seem pretty desperate for drivers right now. Not sure if you’ve noticed this at OD? Im gonna ask the manager if its due to logistics need or turnover rate.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I've spoken to some XPO guys in passing. Like Bob said, the equipment is hit or miss. They use freightliners, internationals and Volvo's.. I've never driven freightliners, but I hate internationals and Volvo's.

The thing about LTL is that each building is run differently. There is a corporate policy and a building policy.

Paid by the hour is a toss up being the bottom guy. If the hours aren't there, you're not getting any. When things die down LTL companies layoff and everything is based on seniority. Lastly, being home every night isn't a guarantee. At FedEx, a bottom p&d guy is pretty much guaranteed to end up on a night shift.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I hear saia is willing to pay 29 an hour starting for experienced drivers at some buildings. Insurance is free after 10 years, they pay overtime after 45 and their routes tend to be pretty long.

Johnboy's Comment
member avatar

Honestly ive applied to estes before when i was just looking for a training program a couple years ago, and the interview process was kind of terrbile. Id be down to give them another shot but their application process is also very disorganized. I went in for interview, made it sound like i was good to go and then didnt get any kind of call back for orientation even after i tried to contact them. So i went with Prime. 🤷🏻‍♂️ I guess my hang up here guys is that all the reviews online for almost every company is the same. Youve got the same salty dudes who either quit or got fired saying they work to hard and management doesn’t care. Also that the companies lie to you. Im taking most of this with a grain of salt because most people who are in the frame of mind to leave an Indeed review are probably angry anyway...but its just getting harder and harder to research these companies i guess. I feel like its basically all the same except for a few select companies like Old dominion . Unfortunately old dominion doesnt work for my location . Wish it did. Anyway thanks for the response i appreciate it

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