Rookie Solo Adventures Of A Knuckle Draggin Primate (Rob D.)

Topic 28708 | Page 3

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Tortuga 's Comment
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Great updates Rob D. Keep em coming, I'm enjoying your adventures!

PJ's Comment
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Awesome job my friend. Rob is very correct, there are many experienced drivers that would not do as well. The longer you do those loads the easier it will get, pretty much second nature.

I’m very glad to hear your enjoying it. Keep up the good work.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
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9/14/2020 Update

So, the honeymoon is over. I hauled my last boat load last Wednesday and then got a load of building materials. I had posted a picture of it in the Flatbed Variety thread. These particular loads are notorious for difficult securement because they just throw stuff everywhere. As far as working load limit, you exceed it several times over because you have to throw extra straps just to secure the loose pieces that weighs hardly anything. I had three separate straps just for these rolls of sheet metal. It took me about 1:45 to secure it. It’s a short load so I deliver the next day in Iowa.

The materials I deliver are to repair roof of industrial buildings damaged by the high winds. Because there are so many pieces on the load, it takes over 2 hours to unload. So I have very little time left on my clock but I make it to my next load which is sheet rock. They have a specific procedure where you drop your trailer, they load and tarp it, then you secure it and leave. Being new, I didn’t know the procedure, but one guy was pretty helpful.

After I’m all secured, I go to pull out and get the low air pressure warning. I think because I’ve been sitting go a while or had been using the brakes and shifting a lot. However, I soon realize that the trailer has an air leak. It’s coming from the front axle (48’ spread axle trailer) and just spewing air out. After getting the air pressure built up and charging the trailer air system, I crawl up under the trailer to find the elbow to a brass fitting just spewing air. I get out my tool kit, tighten the brass fitting, and push in on the elbow. That seems to have fixed it. (BTW, I had some help in diagnosing this from Packrat). Head out and get as far as I can.

I deliver to a Kohl’s jobsite the next day and it’s another long wait. They are two flatbeds in front of me and they are using a crane lift the sheet rock up on the roof one small section at a time. After about three hours they bring a telehandler (forklift with a boom) and unload me next.

It’s Friday afternoon now and I my next load is picking up in Chicago. Tight corners, precarious bridges, and a decent amount of tariff. I get there about 17:45. Again, they have a procedure but they are neither good at communicating it or executing it themselves. The load is steel pipe and it needs to be tarped. Steel pipe will slice right through tarps. I get my moving blankets on as best I can. I give my 2 steel tarps and smoke tarp to the guy who loads tarps machine and he says that they won’t work; he needs my blue lumber tarp. After he loads the tarp machine he leaves for lunch and tells me that someone else will drop the tarps on the load. This new guy and I find out that the other guy loaded the tarps on the machine sideways. That’s why they weren’t long enough. After the tarps dropping several times, we get them on. After I pull out, the blue lumber tarp blows half way off. I realize how screwed up the tarp job is and decide to redo it the correct way with two steel tarps and my smoke tarp. I spend about 2 hours rotating one of the steel tarps (the second guy and I had put at least one on the correct way) and added my smoke tarp. I also spent some time making sure that that the tarp was not pressed against the sharp edges of the steel pipe. After packing everything up I head out on PC because I’ve blown through my 14 hour clock. I have to drive about 50 miles because I’m in Chicago and the Petro at exit 240 is the closet truck stop of any size.

On the way to the Petro, I get a message from dispatch “did you make to the 01; are you loaded.” I didn’t send and arrival or departure. And I also realize that I left without my bill of lading. When I get to the Petro, I message that I did get loaded and drove about 50 miles away for the night. Can I get an electronic copy of the bill of lading? While I’m having the message exchange with dispatch, I get a call from the shipper (the second guy who helped f up my tarps). Good thing I didn’t go off on him because now I need his help. I explain that I’m 50 miles away and he asks me to text my e-mail address to him; he will e-mail all the paperwork to me.

I will be spending another 34 hour reset at home, so I print them off at home and take them with me to the receiver on Monday. After I come back to the truck on Sunday, I realize that the steel pipe has cut through the tarps. A couple of 1 inch cuts. I pull them part way off, put more moving blankets down, and tape up the holes.

I get started early Monday morning and make it to the receiver about 8:45. One of the first things that the forklift operator says is that we didn’t need to tarp the load. They leave the pipe out in the elements. It takes about and hour and half to unload. Then I have to wait for a while to get the next load, which is plywood going to Davenport, Iowa. About 960 miles total.

So, even with all of the delays and frustrations, I will have over 2,400 miles on this next paycheck.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Papa Pig's Comment
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Rob, come on over to my side of the world . You won’t have to deal with any of that 🤣😂 I had to ... you do it to me so often . Lol

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Rob welcome to real world trucking. I’m sorry you had such a rough week, but sounds like you handled it very well.

When I did flatbed I drove for a private fleet and didn’t have to deal with that stuff.

I much prefer tankers. Drop the stuff in, close the hatch and roll.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

You have good weeks and bad ones. Thats just trucking. Even still with all the difficulties 2400 miles ain't nothing to sneeze at. Ill admit I was jealous with the boat loads but its loads like those ones that make me glad im a door swinger lol

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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