Driving The Western 11

Topic 29119 | Page 2

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Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

What issues are you having with your QC? I'm sure we have quite a few drivers here who are familiar with that system. Also, you should have a "cheat sheet" that shows how to do everything with it which is actually a DOT requirement.

For me I always would forget something such as putting in the trip number. What I ended up doing that helped me was creating a list of everything I needed to do before leaving. Do it all the same way everytime and it's much easier to remember.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Yep that’s the problem I’m having I forget just stupid stuff I try to make a cheat sheet and I make it wrong just dumb stuff an my qaulcom acts up and it comes on but the screen won’t stuff like that mike b and Georgia mike been helping me with everything from that to driving situations I just need to get better at the qaulcom com my backing is horrible lol but it’s coming went to dc that for the 1st time asked me to slide ransoms back before I parked trailer oh man that took forever I got it and I’m getting better just need to be more confident at qaulcom trip planning etc

What issues are you having with your QC? I'm sure we have quite a few drivers here who are familiar with that system. Also, you should have a "cheat sheet" that shows how to do everything with it which is actually a DOT requirement.

For me I always would forget something such as putting in the trip number. What I ended up doing that helped me was creating a list of everything I needed to do before leaving. Do it all the same way everytime and it's much easier to remember.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

It's a good idea to always slide the tandems before loading or unloading, unless you are directed not to.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Thanks pack rat I’ve been told not to for the most part because how tight the the drops have been but tj max and 2 Home Depot’s and ikea up in span away Washington have told me to slide them back

It's a good idea to always slide the tandems before loading or unloading, unless you are directed not to.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I normally get all lined up for the dock, or drop spot, then slide the tandems to the rear.

As long as these are back before you bump the dock, that's all that matters.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I normally get all lined up for the dock, or drop spot, then slide the tandems to the rear.

As long as these are back before you bump the dock, that's all that matters.

I typically do as Packrat as well, Even if they won't allow you through until tandems are back. When you get through slide them back up if you need to just don't forget to put them back!

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Got it thanks guy I will try this tomorrow morning

double-quotes-start.png

I normally get all lined up for the dock, or drop spot, then slide the tandems to the rear.

As long as these are back before you bump the dock, that's all that matters.

double-quotes-end.png

I typically do as Packrat as well, Even if they won't allow you through until tandems are back. When you get through slide them back up if you need to just don't forget to put them back!

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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