Motion Sickness Caused By Simulators

Topic 29127 | Page 1

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CajunWon's Comment
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Do training companies make accommodations for those who have a hard time with simulators?

I've never been on a simulator. And I have enjoyed some of the video games, but some of them bring on motion sickness. And it takes more than an hour to recover. I've been on the video driven rides at Universal, but may take a Dramamine prior, otherwise have to close eyes before ride is over. Also not good in back seat of cars, so I typically do all the driving. Like have driven straight through to/from Milwaukee to Raleigh a few times, I just get in a driving zone and get r done.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
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Getting in the zone and got it done is not going to cut it behind the wheel of a semi. You're an accident waiting to happen.

Do you get car sick whenever someone else drives? That's going to be a significant problem in an actual truck. Not all companies have simulators for training.

Paul F. 's Comment
member avatar

I did get a touch of vertigo on the simulators from time to time, it was nothing serious and really quite minor. I am someone that loves rollercoasters, I’m not afraid of heights and have been parasailing quite a few times, so i don’t know the reason why it happened to me.

I would suggest seeing a neurologist. It may be something simple. And without being as abrasive as the previous responder I wouldn’t want you to endanger yourself or the general motoring public if this could possibly happen to you while driving an 80,000 pound vehicle that while out of control can easily cause mayhem.

Just be safe, and good luck to you.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

By all means, Paul, feel free to critique my other 5800 posts when you have time, okay?

My opinions are not sugar-coated for those that want factual answers. My sincere apology for offending you or the OP in my limited spare time posting each day.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m lousy in simulators, but no problem in vehicles. However, I only had to do minor, training in simulation and usually less than 15 minutes. Everything else was in a real truck.

If the majority of your training will be in a simulator, you might wanna look for a different training program.

If the motion sickness happens in vehicles, that can be a problem.

CajunWon's Comment
member avatar

Do you get car sick whenever someone else drives? That's going to be a significant problem in an actual truck. Not all companies have simulators for training.

No need to sugar-coat anything (and you shorted yourself 80+ posts). But would appreciate if someone knows an answer to the question.

It's been a few decades since car issues, but never chunks :), just a bad feeling.

I like roller coasters, but the Spiderman Universal ride -I wouldn't do twice. Sport fishing in 12' waves of the Gulf Stream, I'm fine if I have the Dramamine in my pocket, even if the rest of the crew is self chumming.

As long as the simulators are open and don't simulate spinning or flipping, while simultaneously falling off a bridge -should be fine. Just a little worried of traveling all that way to have issue with a small thing.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

's Comment
member avatar

Do training companies make accommodations for those who have a hard time with simulators?

I've never been on a simulator. And I have enjoyed some of the video games, but some of them bring on motion sickness. And it takes more than an hour to recover. I've been on the video driven rides at Universal, but may take a Dramamine prior, otherwise have to close eyes before ride is over. Also not good in back seat of cars, so I typically do all the driving. Like have driven straight through to/from Milwaukee to Raleigh a few times, I just get in a driving zone and get r done.

Hi ,I am a student driver at Prime. On there simulators I had a couple of times when taking a turn on a city street a had a little stomach flip. This is very unusual as I have never had issues of motion or car sickness. I am close to testing out for my cdl and have had zero issues when driving the truck. Just my 2 cents. Good luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

On a different thread a member who drives for Prime said that the instructors can adjust the screen setting which will usually help.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Pack Rat tells it like it is...

Getting in the zone and got it done is not going to cut it behind the wheel of a semi. You're an accident waiting to happen.

Do you get car sick whenever someone else drives? That's going to be a significant problem in an actual truck. Not all companies have simulators for training.

The zone... interesting concept. I’ve never been in the zone when driving, at least not the zone I’m in when listening to or playing music. At the end of a 12-14 hour shift I am mentally whipped, and physically beat. Any zone I’ve ever been “in” does not leave me in that state.

Safely operating a semi requires the ability to stay focused, scanning mirrors/the road ahead as if in unison, anticipate potential risks, make constant corrections, all the while maintaining a level head and resisting the male tendency for aggressive behavior. Situational awareness is required 100% of the time and required to stay out of trouble and safe. Does that sound like a zone?

I could go on...but point made. This cannot be compared to anything, I mean anything you’ve experienced thus far. Forget what you know...and worrying about the potential of motion sickness in the simulator? Minor in comparison to the true challenges that lie ahead.

Get to know these links:

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Dan67's Comment
member avatar

Now I can give you some perspective from my point of view. I have sensitivity to some light frequencies. The large monitors on the simulators make me nauseous, but not to the point of needing a trash can. But on the other hand, cops blue LED strobes rapid flashing during darkness after a few minutes and I'll be needing a 55 gallon barrel. I have been cleared by doctors so it's a none issue, just something to be aware of and plan accordingly.

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