Picking A School.

Topic 29134 | Page 1

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ScooterTrashMama's Comment
member avatar

I've been lurking for a few months since I've been contemplating driving a truck. I'm leaning toward going to school after the new year, possibly in February. I've pretty much narrowed my choices to Sage or Roadmaster but Prime is not out of the running. I'm leaning toward Roadmaster simply because there is one in my city but I do have the flexibility to attend elsewhere. Any feedback is appreciated.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you for coming out of the shadows and joining in on the conversations. Have you considered Paid CDL Training Programs you can even Apply For Paid CDL Training right here on this website. Fill out 1 application and it will be sent to many different companies.

Take a look at this article that Brett wrote why he Prefers paid training Each company handles it just a little differently, but for the most part they you through their schooling for a small fee, or for free in exchange you sign a contract to work for them a set time usually about a year.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
ScooterTrashMama's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for coming out of the shadows and joining in on the conversations. Have you considered Paid CDL Training Programs you can even Apply For Paid CDL Training right here on this website. Fill out 1 application and it will be sent to many different companies.

Take a look at this article that Brett wrote why he Prefers paid training Each company handles it just a little differently, but for the most part they you through their schooling for a small fee, or for free in exchange you sign a contract to work for them a set time usually about a year.

I'm willing to consider all options that will set me up for my best chance to succeed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
tripletdad's Comment
member avatar

I did the paid Cdl training from this page. I got my training, I have my Cdl and a job, so I guess you’d say I was successful. I went through millis. They pay for food and hotel during the training. I’d be happy to answer any questions you have

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

The list here Paid CDL Training Programs is not every company that offers paid training and many of those listed have changed the way they do things.

For example CFI, who I trained with and drive for. They just raised the pay students get once they upgrade.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey I m brand new and have been contemplating this career as a second new lease on life. ... I ve been a chef for my whole life ( plus done some other stuff) and own a restaurant, which as you may guess is a nightmare with this Virus and all, let alone the work ethic of the younger generation.. so I think its time to "exit stage left" . I started out answering an ad for school bus drivers and that they would pay ya an train ya to get your license. Just to keep busy during the idle times I have available, and like every kid, I ve been fascinated by the these rigs and always wanted to drive one. That got me doing some research and I came across this site and really appreciate Brett A putting it together. I ve learned a ton by looking at the whole thing and reading the imput from experienced guys. I have no illusions of grandeur that this can be a tough job and I have always approached any thing similar knowing you only get out what you put in.. I am 61 yaers old but feel like a 25 year old ...and I'm 165lbs soakin wet so I m thinking haulin lumber or metal coils and securing tarps are not the direction I ll be headin... BUT, as I ve read the stuff Brett talks about , I think Im more cut out for this than I ever thought. Be professional , look good, work hard, aim to please, don't feel entitled ( my girlfriend says she thinks I m too pretty and the roughnecks in the rest areas are gonna lovvvve me !! ) I think since I ve been a owner for a long time and understand you don't get anything for nothing ... this is a great adventure. I ve signed up for Sage school ( and I hope thats the right decision. My motive is , I m not able to disappear from obligations till I tie up some loose ends so OTR has to wait a bit , but I have the time to learn the basics, not have to obligate to a 1 year or better contract and there are soo many jobs out there local or daily that I can gain some experience and not disappoint a company giving me a chance. I spent a couple weeks with this sight and the materials, and guess what ... just passed my permit tests yesterday including Passenger and School bus. starting Monday with a bus company and Sage school the the following week. It all depends on your direction, I can't imagine that there is a better time to get into a job where you are a self motivating worker with no Boss breathin down your desk ( as long as you perform),avoiding social gathering of more than 10 people( only 2 seats in them trucks from what I hear!) an having opportunity to work and make money regardless of who's president or who doesn't want to show up for work in todays world. Good Luck man,

I've been lurking for a few months since I've been contemplating driving a truck. I'm leaning toward going to school after the new year, possibly in February. I've pretty much narrowed my choices to Sage or Roadmaster but Prime is not out of the running. I'm leaning toward Roadmaster simply because there is one in my city but I do have the flexibility to attend elsewhere. Any feedback is appreciated.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

ScooterTrashMama's Comment
member avatar

I did the paid Cdl training from this page. I got my training, I have my Cdl and a job, so I guess you’d say I was successful. I went through millis. They pay for food and hotel during the training. I’d be happy to answer any questions you have

Thanks for the reply. How much time between your initial application and the start of school? How many were in your class at the beginning and how many ended up getting their CDL?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
ScooterTrashMama's Comment
member avatar

Hey I m brand new and have been contemplating this career as a second new lease on life. ...I ve signed up for Sage school ( and I hope thats the right decision.

double-quotes-end.png

Be sure to post your progress. I downloaded the CDL manual to begin studying for my permit test; my study skills aren't what they used to be so it might be a few weeks before I feel ready to take it...lol.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

I spent about 2 weeks researching and reading and contemplating,. The Bus driving job called me back 3 times to ask if I was ready to start. They are jonesing for help cause so many people cant pass the drug test! Sage School said they start classes every 2 weeks and like to keep them limited to 6-8 at a time and for drive time its 1 to one with the instructor. then when I wanted to sign up they postponed me 2 weeks because they had an experienced trainer coming back after a leave cause he lost his wife after 50 years, and the manager thought I would get a better experience if I waited. so I went to get a drug test and studied for about a week with the state book and then I found this sight, I'm telling you that this practice test lay out and format taught me alot more than just reading the state manual, the way they track your mistakes and force review before moving in to more info. plus the explanations at the bottom of the question really help. I also spent time on UTUBE to get a better understanding of the actual controls of air brakes and stuff that you really need a physical reference to be able to understand properly. and how they are applied etc and that really made it a lot clearer. during that time I got a DOT physical and scheduled my permit tests, I live upstate NY and alot of DMVs are closed so I had to test 50 miles away and make an appt. Don,t rush into DMV unless you re confident you got the basics down. the questions on the actual test are pretty much the same as the practice but they ask some a little differently and it can throw ya when you are feeling under pressure. I start with the bus company on Monday and Sage the following Monday!

double-quotes-start.png

Hey I m brand new and have been contemplating this career as a second new lease on life. ...I ve signed up for Sage school ( and I hope thats the right decision.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Be sure to post your progress. I downloaded the CDL manual to begin studying for my permit test; my study skills aren't what they used to be so it might be a few weeks before I feel ready to take it...lol.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar
I downloaded the CDL manual to begin studying for my permit test

The CDL manual was a confusing tool to me. It cramps a lot of information into a book and some of it may apply to you and some of it won't. I recommend using the high road program here.

High Road CDL Training Program

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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