23 Years Old Kiddo Interested In Join The Trade, Many Questions!

Topic 29147 | Page 1

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Matthew W.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello: Become a trucker is something that I always had thought about, but it wasn't until recent couple of weeks I start seriously researching and get to know the ups and downs of this career.

One of my biggest questions is about training right now. If I go with a paid company like CRST, C.R England and um....Swift, would that lock me into a very rigid contract that makes me not able to get out of them? I mean I am okay with repaying the training tuition but afraid that I won't have room to back out with the contract.

I am in Southern California, anyone knows good company around here?

Tank you

Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hello: Become a trucker is something that I always had thought about, but it wasn't until recent couple of weeks I start seriously researching and get to know the ups and downs of this career.

One of my biggest questions is about training right now. If I go with a paid company like CRST, C.R England and um....Swift, would that lock me into a very rigid contract that makes me not able to get out of them? I mean I am okay with repaying the training tuition but afraid that I won't have room to back out with contract.

I am in Southern California, anyone knows good company around here?

Thank you

Howdy, Matthew, and welcome to the forum! I've got a kiddo your age myself, LoL~!!

I'm going to bounce you a few links for 'starter' reading . . . but real quick, wanna share with you out of your 3 companies listed: CRE and CRST will be TEAMING . . . Swift would be MY choice of the 3. (AND CRST contracts are like concrete. . . good luck breaking free...just my 2cents!)

Any reason you've not considered Prime, Wilson, Jim Palmer? TMC for flatbed? <<< at YOUR age, I'd start there, tbh!!

CFI is ALSO another GREAT training company. Read some of Big Scott 's diaries and posts!!

*My husband has been driving for 20 plus years; I'm just the 'cheerleader' of the forum, I guess . . . haha!*

Check THESE links out:

Apply For Truck Driving JobsApply For Truck Driving Jobs

The last link will take all of ONE minute to apply, to COMPANY PAID schooling, which is what we HIGHLY (overtly) recommend!! Read the links; you'll see why! Within our application, you'll find Millis Transfer will receive your application; another stellar company!

Again, welcome to TruckingTRUTH!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

Company sponsored training generally requires a one year commitment to work off the tuition. CRST is 10 months, I believe and Roehl is based on mileage. I think 125K miles pays off your debt. The only way out of it is to buy out the contract but good luck finding an employer that won't require more training with less than 6 months experience and in some cases 1 year.

It's in your best interest to stick with your first company for at least 1 year. You gain the experience and you show future employers that you're not bouncing all over the industry.

That's one of the reasons sponsored training works out best. You don't pay for anything upfront or out of pocket and you're guaranteed a job upon completion. That company also has a vested interest in your success so they'll do everything they can to ensure you succeed. Training people isn't cheap, especially when you're covering travel and lodging. That investment grants you some leeway in those oops moments when/if you hit something. They expect you to have those issues, so they're a little more forgiving.

If you pay for your license by going to a school, your first company has no skin in the game if something goes wrong.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Company sponsored training generally requires a one year commitment to work off the tuition. CRST is 10 months, I believe and Roehl is based on mileage. I think 125K miles pays off your debt. The only way out of it is to buy out the contract but good luck finding an employer that won't require more training with less than 6 months experience and in some cases 1 year.

It's in your best interest to stick with your first company for at least 1 year. You gain the experience and you show future employers that you're not bouncing all over the industry.

That's one of the reasons sponsored training works out best. You don't pay for anything upfront or out of pocket and you're guaranteed a job upon completion. That company also has a vested interest in your success so they'll do everything they can to ensure you succeed. Training people isn't cheap, especially when you're covering travel and lodging. That investment grants you some leeway in those oops moments when/if you hit something. They expect you to have those issues, so they're a little more forgiving.

If you pay for your license by going to a school, your first company has no skin in the game if something goes wrong.

All the additional things I should've said, Banks! Also . . . the O/P could possibly go YOUR route, entering the industry! Hook him up w/YOUR links!

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

FedEx freight is currently hiring driver apprentices in San Diego. Idk where in Cali the OP is, but it's certainly worth looking into. After my first year, I'm grossing close to 75K a year and I still have 2 more raises to go before reaching top rate. If you're interested, you can apply at https://careers.fedex.com/fedex/

I always v recommend having your permit before applying because you'll definitely get called. If you put that you don't have a permit or a CDL on the app, chances are they'll pass you over.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Definitely take advantage of Paid CDL Training Programs. Don't let the contract deter you. Some companies will still require you to sign a 1 year contract if you go through private school. Regardless of which route you take you'll still be sent out with a trainer for 2 weeks minimum. Training is expensive and they want to be sure you're not going to bail before they had an opportunity to profit on their investment (you). In my opinion (and others here) you're going to get a much better learning opportunity going through paid training than a for profit school. Trucking companies make their money moving freight. In order to keep freight moving they need to bring in many potential drivers and hope that they can turn them into a productive driver. Most people that get started have never been around trucks or backed trailers so there's no way of knowing who will make it. At a private (for profit) school they only care about getting you enrolled and getting your money. If you don't pass the first time they may charge you additional money to retake the test and use their equipment. They've also been known to tell individuals with criminal or poor driving records they'll have no problem getting hired. Now you've spent potentially $8,000 or more on a useless piece of plastic in your wallet. By the time those past mistakes no longer carry as much weight in hiring decisions you're not hirable because your CDL is considered stale due to it being so long since school and no experience. By going through paid training they make sure you fit hiring criteria BEFORE getting started.

We've had members start at the 3 companies mentioned and done quite well. Keep in mind CRST is team only, and C.R. England may start on the low end for pay but once you establish yourself and prove to be an asset your pay will quickly raise. Ignore any of the trash you read or hear about them. Most often it's people that haven't even worked for them, or those that failed and refuse to look at what their part in it not working out was. These companies must be doing something right to have many million mile drivers and be successful for many years.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Along with the great advice seen above, remember this: You can look at your first opportunity (even if it is not the ideal situation for you) as some valuable training and experience. After you have fulfilled your contract, you will have the training and enough experience to be more picky about choosing where you want to go next.

I was rejected by my first choice of companies to drive with. After I completed a year with the company that paid for my schooling and training I was able to get a job with the company I originally had my heart set on.

I suppose at your age a full year seems like a long time, but it isn't. You really can't go wrong with signing on with a company that offers you a chance. Make the most of that opportunity and a whole realm of possibilities will open up for you after a year of experience. Good luck!

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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