I Think It's Time To Move On

Topic 29277 | Page 3

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Banks's Comment
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I can't really answer specifics because each building has the freedom to operate in a way that works for that building.

When you get hired as a driver apprentice, you work the dock for 8 hours (or more of there's overtime) until it's your turn to train. It's not half a day of dock work and half a day of being on a truck, it's a full day (most likely night) of you being on the dock. Training, like everything else, goes in order of seniority. Those that were hired as driver apprentices before you, will train first. I waited 2 months until it was my turn.

Once you start training, it'll be one on one for 4-6 weeks. The pretrip is very thorough, but don't stress it. It's not that hard once you get the rhythm and pattern of it. Everything is a test. That means follow all instructions and tuck in your polo. You can do everything perfectly, but if you can't follow instructions or do things your way, they'll probably fail you. Find out who went through the program in your building and they'll be able to give you a full rundown of what to expect.

Don't go crazy buying warm clothes because you'll have your uniforms in about 2 or 3 weeks. Invest in good boots and warm gloves because the dock is freezing this time of year. It's usually colder on the dock than it is outside.

If you have any other questions feel free to ask and I'll do my best to answer them for you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Auggie69's Comment
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FedEx Freight has the best training in the industry. You are literally one-on-one with a trainer for two months. After that depending on the needs of the center you may be sent on the dock and do road runs or just dock work or you may be sent into the City and work day shifts for awhile

Banks's Comment
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FedEx Freight has the best training in the industry. You are literally one-on-one with a trainer for two months. After that depending on the needs of the center you may be sent on the dock and do road runs or just dock work or you may be sent into the City and work day shifts for awhile

That is very true. Instructors are always following up about you. I constantly get called from my DDI asking if I'm having any issues and to address issues he's heard from other people that I'm having. They'll help you in any way they can and work on the things you want to work on in the future. For example, I suck at 53 footers. My DDI came in on a Saturday, off the clock, to walk me through it. He didn't have to do that and I don't think they all do it, but it had a vested interest in my success.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Papa Pig's Comment
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If you live close to a distribution center there are local jobs for dg. If you send me your zip I can tell you what is available with my company in your area

DaveDiesel's Comment
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I'm exhausted and it's not the work, it's the lack there of. I don't move for 12-14 hours a day so I'm not using any energy and then I have trouble sleeping because I'm not tired. I'm also gaining weight at a rate that I feel isn't healthy. In the last 7 months I've gained 30-40 pounds.

Switch to regional flatbeddingsmile.gif

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Newdriver's Comment
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Hello Banks, can you tell me how your dock training went? Been on the forklift about a week and it has been up and down. I know I have to do more training on the computer for the dock after 2 weeks....is this another test, just looking for any and all info you can give me since you went through this program . Thank you for any info!

And it's not because FedEx isn't a good company, I think they're great but I'm having some issues and I've been thinking a lot.

I came into this thinking I wanted to be a Road Driver (Linehaul Driver) because what can be better than being on the highways and making 90-105K a year?

I've been an unofficial road driver for the past 6 or 7 months. I'm exhausted and it's not the work, it's the lack there of. I don't move for 12-14 hours a day so I'm not using any energy and then I have trouble sleeping because I'm not tired. I'm also gaining weight at a rate that I feel isn't healthy. In the last 7 months I've gained 30-40 pounds.

This is the first job I've ever had that's mostly sitting. I'm not enjoying it as much as I thought I would. I miss the physicality of working in Walmart's distribution center or being a delivery driver for FedEx ground. I'm bored out of my mind going to the same buildings every day, driving on the same highways listening to the same songs and podcasts.

The only benefit is the money. This is the most money I've ever made, but I'm starting to think it isn't worth it.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Banks's Comment
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Dock work isn't a test, it's just work and an opportunity for you to familiarize yourself with how FedEx does things. I know it probably looks overwhelming because you see guys moving at an insane pace and you feel like you can't keep up. Ignore it, it'll come with time and that's not what you're there for.

Show up, be on time and keep your nose clean and you'll be fine. Don't destroy freight and be sure to notate anything that's damaged. I used to think it was a race and I had to keep up with everybody else, but it isn't. Work at your pace and be safe. It'll come to you soon enough.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Dock work isn't a test, it's just work and an opportunity for you to familiarize yourself with how FedEx does things. I know it probably looks overwhelming because you see guys moving at an insane pace and you feel like you can't keep up. Ignore it, it'll come with time and that's not what you're there for.

Show up, be on time and keep your nose clean and you'll be fine. Don't destroy freight and be sure to notate anything that's damaged. I used to think it was a race and I had to keep up with everybody else, but it isn't. Work at your pace and be safe. It'll come to you soon enough.

Are you still hanging in w/them for now, Banks? Have you moved on and I missed it ?!?!

Just wondering. You give AWESOME advice on this topic, gotta say.

~ Anne ~

Banks's Comment
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Thank you, Anne.

I'm sitting tight for the time being. I want to try food service, but the future for a bottom guy in that industry is too uncertain and this isn't a decision that affects just me. The reason it's uncertain is the random restaurant shutdowns happening here.

The last shutdown was kind of crazy. A lot of mom and pop restaurants refused to close and allowed dining in, so maybe it isn't so bleak.

US foods, performance food group, McLane and Sysco are all putting out heavy recruitment ads with some offering sign on bonuses.

I just miss doing physical labor. It's all I've ever done and I thought I couldn't wait to get a cushy job that pays a lot for minimal work. Turns out, I miss it more than I thought I would.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you, Anne.

I'm sitting tight for the time being. I want to try food service, but the future for a bottom guy in that industry is too uncertain and this isn't a decision that affects just me. The reason it's uncertain is the random restaurant shutdowns happening here.

The last shutdown was kind of crazy. A lot of mom and pop restaurants refused to close and allowed dining in, so maybe it isn't so bleak.

US foods, performance food group, McLane and Sysco are all putting out heavy recruitment ads with some offering sign on bonuses.

I just miss doing physical labor. It's all I've ever done and I thought I couldn't wait to get a cushy job that pays a lot for minimal work. Turns out, I miss it more than I thought I would.

Well explained, Banks. Well put. See, us'ns getting 'older' just DON'T miss the physical parts, I guess, LoL!

There's always 'flatbed' ... pitching tarps in the snow/ice etc .. ~!

Keep us in the loop. Those foodservice guys make pretty good coin, and they darn sure earn it. I hear you there.

~ Anne ~

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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